Human Genetics  BIOL 10700:  Fall 2012


MWF 11:00­-11:50 a.m
.


Williams 225







Instructor: Amy Lyndaker

Email: alyndaker@ithaca.edu
Phone
: 607­274­1181
Office: 165 Center for Natural Sciences (CNS)
Office Hours: 
  • Monday: noon - 1 pm.
  • Wednesday 3:30­ - 5pm
  • and by appointment







Required:
1.  Human Genetics: Concepts and Applications, 10th edition, by Ricki Lewis (ISBN: 9780073525303).
While the book is relatively expensive, it is an essential resource for the course. Students may opt to purchase the E-book version if they prefer, and I have also placed five copies of the textbook on reserve in the library, so everyone should have access to the book. Please email me if you have any questions regarding the textbook.




  2. ResponseCard NXT clickers  (ISBN: 9781934931493). Please let me know if you have any problems getting a clicker.




Course website:  Sakai






Course description:

Have you ever wondered which traits your children might inherit? Why are some of us susceptible to certain diseases, while others are not? What can we really learn from the sequence of the human genome? Genetics is the study of inherited traits and variation. Although the term “geneticis often used in association with disease, our genes provide a great variety of characteristics that create much of our individuality, from our hair and eye color, to the shapes of our body parts, to our talents and personality traits. This course is aimed at explaining the basics of genetics and inheritance, while also providing you the tools and knowledge to ask informed questions about genetics ­related policies, news reports, and even your own genome.

Course aims and objectives:

This course will cover basic mechanisms of inheritance, the genetic basis of human traits and diseases, and introductory genomics, including topics as varied as cloning, gene therapy, stem cell biology, the Human Genome Project, DNA forensics, and personalized medicine.

Specific learning objectives:

 

Format and procedures: Class periods will consist of 50 minute lectures, with questions and discussion highly encouraged. Students will be evaluated on material from assigned readings as well as material presented in class, and are thus expected to attend all classes, take notes during class, and do the assigned reading. Clickers will be used to calculate attendance and to facilitate in ­class participation. Students will be expected to come to class prepared, be actively engaged during class, participate during class by asking and answering questions, and be respectful of others. Weekly homework assignments will be assigned and turned in on Sakai. Cell phone use during class is not permitted.


Course requirements:

Class attendance and participation:

Assignments:


Exams:

Course evaluations:

 

Student input is highly valued and is important to maintain high quality instruction. Course evaluations are mandatory and must be completed at the end of the semester. An incomplete may appear on your transcript if it is not submitted by that time. The evaluation will be submitted to the Department Assistant. She will verify that you have submitted the form. Once that has been checked, your identification will be removed and will not be printed with the comments.


 Grading:

                        (a) Attendance and class participation (10%)

                        (b) Homework (15%)

                        (c) Three in­-class exams (60%; 20% each)

                        (d) Final project (15%)

 

There is no extra credit!

Academic integrity

All work that you submit should be your own. Information obtained from external sources should be fully and appropriately cited. All written assignments in this course may be checked for plagiarism using Turnitin. Academic dishonesty can lead to a zero grade on an assignment, a failing grade in the course, academic code probation, or suspension/expulsion from the college depending on the gravity of the violation and the decision of the judicial board.

Accommodations for students with disabilities

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, reasonable accommodation will be provided to students with documented disabilities on a case­by­-case basis. Students must register with Student Disability Services and provide appropriate documentation to Ithaca College before any academic adjustment will be provided

 

Mental health statement

Diminished mental health, including significant stress, mood changes, excessive worry, or problems with eating and/or sleeping can interfere with optimal academic performance. The source of symptoms might be related to your course work; if so, please speak with me. However, problems with relationships, family worries, loss, or a personal struggle or crisis can also contribute to decreased academic performance. Ithaca College provides cost­ free mental health services through the Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) to help you manage personal challenges that threaten your personal or academic well­-being. In the event I suspect you need additional support, expect that I will express to you my concerns and the reasons for them. It is not my intent to know the details of what might be troubling you, but simply to let you know I am concerned and that help (e.g., CAPS, Health Center, Chaplains, etc.), if needed, is available. Remember, getting help is a smart and courageous thing to do ­for yourself and for your loved ones.



Tentative schedule (may be subject to change) -- refer Sakai

Lecture #

Date

Topics

Reading

Assignments

1

8/29

Course overview

1: p1-8

 

2

8/31

Introduction to genetics

1: p9-15

HW due

 

No class 9/3

--Labor day-

 

 

3

9/5

Cell biology and mitosis

2: p19-36

 

4

9/7

Meiosis and gametogenesis

3: p44-52

HW due

5

9/10

Sex determination and the sex chromosomes

6: p110-116; 13: p248-250

 

6

9/12

Basic inheritance and Mendelian genetics

4: p69-75, 84-85

 

7

9/14

Modes of inheritance: Dominance

4: p75-84

HW due

8

9/17

Modes of inheritance: Sex linkage

6: p116-124

 

9

9/19

Extensions to Mendelian genetics

5: p89-106

 

10

9/21

Multifactorial traits

7: p130-136, p144-146

HW due

11

9/24

Genes and behavior

8: p149-160

 

12

9/26

Exam 1

 

 

13

9/28

DNA as the genetic material, and the structure of DNA

9: p164-171

no HW

14

10/1

Chromosome structure and DNA replication

9: p171-176; 13: p235-238

 

15

10/3

Gene function: Gene structure and transcription

10: p180-185

 

16

10/5

Gene function: Translation

10: p185-196

HW due

17

10/8

Gene function: Gene expression and epigenetics

11: p199-208, 6:124-127

 

18

10/10

Gene mutation: Causes and types of mutations

12: 211-223

 

19

10/12

Gene mutation: Consequences of mutation and DNA repair

12: p224-232

HW due

20

10/15

Aneuploidy and disease

13: p236-248, 250-256

 

21

10/17

Development, birth defects, and aging

3: p53-62

 

 

No class 10/19

--Fall break-

 

no HW

22

10/22

Cancer genetics: What is cancer?

18: p348-356

 

23

10/24

Cancer genetics: Susceptibility genes

18: p356-364

 

24

10/26

Cancer genetics: Genetic profiling and treatment

18: p364-368

HW due

25

10/29

Exam 2

 

 

26

10/31

How do we study genetics?: Biotechniques

 

 

27

11/2

How do we study genetics?: DNA modification and genetic engineering

19: p371-379

Final project topics due

28

11/5

How do we study genetics?: Model organisms

19: p379-384

 

29

11/7

How do we study genetics?: Population genetics and twin studies

7: p137-143

 

30

11/9

Genetic testing and genetic counseling

20: p388-396

HW due

31

11/12

Gene therapies

20: p396-403

 

32

11/14

Reproductive technologies

21: p406-419

 

33

11/16

Forensics and DNA profiling

14: p260-274

Final project outline due

 

No class 11/19 -11/23

--Happy Thanksgiving!-

 

 

34

11/26

Cloning, stem cell biology, and stem cell therapies

2: p36-40

 

35

11/28

Genomics: The Human Genome Project 1

22: p423-430

 

36

11/30

Genomics: The Human Genome Project 2

 

HW due

37

12/3

Genomics: What makes us human? Comparative genomics and ancestry

22: p430-434, 16: 310-317

 

38

12/5

Exam 3

 

 

39

12/7

Genomics: Personal genomes and personalized medicine

22: p434-437

no HW

40

12/10

Genetics in the media

 

Final project due

41

12/12

Project showcase day 1

 

Peer evaluations due

42

12/14

Project showcase day 2

 

Peer evaluations due

 


Page maintained by Nancy Pierce.
Last updated 8/2012