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Index

Ithaca College Undergraduate Catalog 2002-2003

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    Art History Courses

376-11000 Introduction to Art   FA LA 3b

    The course examines the influential visual conventions that have been used for creating images in Western culture and the language that has been developed to discuss them. The course also focuses on common subjects represented in visual imagery, and the cultural agendas that these subjects traditionally have served. Additional attention is paid to the ways that modern and postmodern images have reinforced or challenged Western traditions. Conservation, vandalism, censorship, and other issues related to art are also discussed. Not open to seniors. 3 credits. (F,Y)

376-11300 The Elements of Architecture   FA LA 3b

    A primer on the topic of architecture and architectural history. Acquaints students with the art of making buildings through a discussion of a variety of topics, among them materials, structure, mechanics, space, and light. Architectural theory is also introduced, from the ideas of Vitruvius through some of the more provocative pronouncements of Venturi. Students will learn to consider the activity surrounding the creation of architecture, including the interaction of architects, clients, builders, and even the natural forces that act upon buildings. Features architectural vocabulary, mastery of which is

    necessary for the analysis and understanding of architectural forms. Not open to seniors. 3 credits. (F,Y)

376-11400 Architecture across Cultures   FA LA 3b, h, g

    An investigation of world architecture, organized by architectural type. Examining such topics as spaces of dwelling, worship, and commerce comparatively across time and place sheds light on the ways in which cultural values and identities are shaped and expressed in architectural form. Students study architectural variety across cultures as an expression of historical, material, and cultural difference, and shared traits between cultures as responses to universal social needs, structural possibilities, and spatial strategies. Not open to seniors. 3 credits. (F or S,Y)

376-11700 Survey of Western Art I   FA LA 3b, h, g

     Introduction to the history of Western art from prehistory through the Middle Ages. Includes the art of Paleolithic and Neolithic peoples, Egypt and the Near East, Greece and Rome, and of medieval times. The course also acquaints students with formal analysis and with the variations in methods and materials used over the centuries. Also offered through the London Center. 3 credits. (F,Y)

376-11800 Survey of Western Art II   FA LA 3b, h, g

     Introduction to the history of Western art from the Renaissance through modern times. Includes the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, the baroque period, and the 18th century to the 20th. The course also acquaints students with formal analysis, and with the variations in methods and materials used over the centuries. Also offered through the London Center. 3 credits. (S,Y)

376-12500 Selected Topics in Art History   FA/HU LA 3b, h, g

    Introduction to the discipline of art history by a review of major categories of art (i.e., portraiture, landscape, genre, still-life, narrative painting, abstraction, representation, sculpture, architecture) within the context of a single theme or period. Not open to seniors. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-13500 Visual Culture   HU LA 3b, h, g

    A study of visual images in a cultural and art historical context. Examines the interactions between art objects, visual images, and the cultures that create them. Through case studies and projects, students learn the ways in which images form a foundation of knowledge in the modern and postmodern world. Not open to seniors. 3 credits. (F or S,Y)

376-13700 Visual Persuasion   HU LA 3b, h

    Explores how images manipulate our values, beliefs, and behaviors overtly and covertly by tapping into a human willingness to confuse belief with knowledge, invoking our inherited cultural values, manipulating our sense of our own past, and channeling our desires to be "purposeful" or "useful" in the future. Investigates overt images of persuasion such as political propaganda; covert images of persuasion such as commercials, print advertisements, and the seductive art of "realism;" and the subversive images of persuasion including the art of "double meaning." Students are encouraged to inquire into the relationships between overt and hidden persuasion in images, between persuasive image-making past and present, and between persuasive images and the cultural contexts that produce them. Not open to seniors. 3 credits. (F or S,Y)

376-20100 Practicing Art History   HU LA

     Designed to develop skills necessary for critical reading of art historical texts, and for recognizing and using a variety of art historical methods. An overview of the history of art history. Presentations by department faculty on individual research practices and methods will be additional components. Among the types of art historical writing that are included are formal analysis, iconography, biography, psychoanalytic interpretation, Marxist and feminist art history, and semiotics. Intended for art history majors; open to nonmajors on a space-available basis. Prerequisites for art history majors: One course in the humanities or fine arts. Prerequisites for others: One course in the humanities or fine arts; permission of instructor; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (F,Y)

376-20200 Body Language   HU LA 3b

    An examination of the human body as a form of visual expression in Western culture. Considers, feature by feature, standards that traditionally have been used to distinguish what is beautiful (or good) from what has been designated as ugly (or bad). Students then investigate how standards have been used to develop potent visual stereotypes that distinguish sex, age, race, and class, and consider contemporary images that affirm or challenge these stereotypes. Visual material includes both traditional art and images from popular culture. Prerequisites: Either one course in art history, or sophomore standing and one course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (S,Y)

376-20300 Egypt and Its Neighbors   HU LA 3b, h, g

     Survey of the art of the Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Minoans, and Myceneans to gain an understanding of these cultures and to see what cross-cultural influences existed among them. Covers the beginning of historical times -- ca. 3000 b.c. -- to about 1200 b.c. in the Aegean and 600 b.c. in Mesopotamia. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-20800 Mythology and Art   HU LA 3b, h, g

    Introduces students to the myths of ancient Greece and Rome through works of art that have illustrated these stories over the last 2,500 years. Using painting, sculpture, prints, drawings, book illustrations, decorative arts, and films, we study the ways that artists have represented, interpreted, and even transformed myths over time. The course is organized around specific myths, allowing us to trace a single motif through the hands of many illustrators. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-20900 Introduction to the Roman World   HU LA 3b, h, g

    Explores the many facets of Roman life as revealed through material culture; the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, mosaics, pottery, metalwork); and the archaeological remains that shed light on the way Romans conducted their everyday lives. This is a thematic, rather than chronological, course. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-21500 The Power of the Print   FA LA 3b, h, g

    Addresses the ways in which the printed image, sometimes in conjunction with written text, has attempted to influence the way people think and act. Through the different print media, ranging from woodcuts to silk screens, anonymous artists and great masters alike have made prints packed with powerful messages. We study the way in which prints succeed in carrying those messages, be they religious, military, political, or social. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-21700 British Art and Architecture I: 1066-1660   HU LA 3b, h, g

    Studies of selected works of visual art from major periods in British history to include British architecture, painting, costume, and design and their relationship to the societies that produced them. Includes survey of Roman, Saxon, and Celtic Britain. Visits to museums and field trips. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts. Offered only through the London Center. 3 credits. (F,Y)

376-21800 British Art and Architecture II: 1660-1914   HU LA 3b, h, g

    A study of selected works of visual art from recent periods in Britain's history and their relationship to the societies that produced them. Analysis of various styles in painting, architecture, costume, and ornament. Visits to museums and field trips. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts. Offered only through the London Center. 3 credits. (S,Y)

376-21900 Arts of Antiquity: Greece and Rome   FA LA 3b, h, g

     Bronze Age art of the Aegean, Greek art from the geometric through the Hellenistic periods, and Roman art to the end of the pagan era. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (F or S,Y)

376-22100 Introduction to the Medieval World   HU LA 3b, h, g

    Explores different facets of medieval life as revealed through the visual and material culture of the Middle Ages. Organized by theme rather than chronology. Topics include modern fascinations with the "medieval," religious functions and contexts for images, medieval places and spaces, visual storytelling, images and objects of daily life, and medieval images of death. Investigates a variety of types of objects and images (including buildings, sculpture, manuscript illumination, metalwork, and mosaics), as well as archaeological remains of medieval life. Prerequisites: Either one course in art history, or sophomore standing and one course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits (O)

376-22200 Architecture from Catacombs to Cathedrals   FA LA 3b, h, g

    A survey of Medieval European architecture from the Early Christian through the Gothic periods. The course follows developments in structure, form, patronage, and function of both religious and secular architecture, ranging from the earliest Christian places of worship and burial to late Gothic cathedrals and palaces. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (F,E)

376-23000 Italian Renaissance Art   HU LA 3b, h, g

    Painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 14th through 16th centuries in Italy. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (F or S,Y)

376-23100 Northern Renaissance Art   HU LA 3b, h, g

     A thematic and chronological exploration of painting, printmaking, and sculpture of northern Europe from the late 14th century through the mid-16th century. Explores such topics as the nature of realism in Flemish panel painting; the physical production and marketing of northern European artworks; the persuasive and subversive impact of printmaking; the effect of the Reformation upon image making; and the development of landscape painting and portraiture. Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder are among the artists whose work is emphasized. Prerequisites: Either one course in art history, or sophomore standing and one course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (S,Y)

376-23200 Architecture from Renaissance to Revolution   FA LA 3b, h, g

     An exploration of European architecture from the 15th to the 18th centuries, focusing on issues of form, space, structure, and meaning. The course begins and ends with "rebirths" of antiquity, considering in-between architectural ideas that seem to stray as far as possible from the classical tradition. Concepts such as Renaissance, baroque, rococo, and neoclassical are examined, as are relevant political and religious circumstances. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (F or S,Y)

376-23300 Great Spaces: An Introduction to Urban Design   FA LA 3b, h, g

     Introduction to the history of open space design, with an emphasis placed on the city. Examination of the principles that generate successful spaces at several scales, from pocket parks and public squares to ceremonial sites and ideal cities. Analysis of the cultural meanings embedded in urban space. Regions covered include Western Europe and Russia, the Americas, and Asia. Chronological scope ranges from ancient to contemporary. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (F or S,Y)

376-23400 Baroque Art   HU LA 3b, h, g

    Major developments in 17th-century painting and sculpture, especially in Italy, Holland, and Flanders. Caravaggio, Bernini, Vermeer, Rembrandt, and Rubens are included. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (F or S,Y)

376-24000 Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Architecture   FA LA 3b, h

     A historical survey of significant architects and their works, from the 19th century to the present. Includes a discussion of aspects of style, design theory, technological developments, and architectural vocabulary. Emphasizes the role of the architect in modern society. Prerequisites: Either one course in art history, or sophomore standing and one course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-25100 Nineteenth-Century European Art   HU LA 3b, h, g

     Major styles of 19th-century painting and sculpture, especially in France but also in Spain, England, and Germany. Neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, and postimpressionism are covered. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (F,Y)

376-25200 Twentieth-Century European Art   HU LA 3b, h, g

     Study of leading European painters and sculptors of the 20th century. Major movements from fauvism and expressionism through cubism, futurism, dadaism, and surrealism. Includes Rouault, Munch, Nolde, Kokoschka, Klee, Kandinsky, Matisse, Picasso, Boccioni, Mondrian, Tatlin, Duchamp, DeChirico, and Miró. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (S,Y)

376-25500 The Mediated Image   HU LA 3b, h, g

    Shows how images are mediated by physical, conceptual, cultural, economic, political, and philosophical conditions of time and place. Students explore the processes by which images are transmitted and received, and how such processes affect the meaning and function of the images. We'll consider, among other visuals, the fine arts, popular imagery, advertising, and visual entertainment. Central to the course is the notion that images are constantly reassessed and reinterpreted according to the manner of presentation, the medium of representation, and the context of reception. Prerequisites: Either one course in art history, or sophomore standing and one course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-26800 Introduction to Japanese Culture   HU LA 1b, h, g

     This interdisciplinary, team-taught introduction to the history and culture of Japan incorporates history, art history, literature, geography, religion, and contemporary affairs to create an understanding of Japan from its origins to the present. Prerequisites: One course in the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences; sophomore standing. Students may not earn credit for both 376-26800 and 311-26800. 3 credits. (O)

376-27500 Selected Topics in Art History   FA/HU LA 3b, h, g

     This course may be repeated for credit for selected topics on different subjects. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-28300 American Visual Culture: 1690-1960   HU LA 3b, h

    Relates the images and objects made by and for Americans to the society that produced them. Organized in a thematic fashion around topics such as democracy, colonialism, progress, materialism, and pop culture. Traditional "art historical" media (painting, sculpture, architecture, and graphic arts) are joined by vernacular building, industrial design, costume, advertising, film, photography, and television to create a fuller "picture" of American life and culture over three centuries. Prerequisites: Either one course in art history, or sophomore standing and one course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (S,Y)

376-28500 Art since 1960   HU LA 3b, g

     Critically explores various avant-garde strategies used since 1960, when artists' practices radically changed. At that time, different working methods combining different media -- and challenging long-held notions of art, artists, society, and even reality -- were introduced. The question But is it art? is one of the central issues we'll debate. Focus on the so-called failure of modernist art, and how postmodernist, postcolonialist, and postfeminist issues define artistic practice today. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or fine arts. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-29000 Technology Project in Art History   U NLA

    Practical experience in the design and implementation of digital-image, Web-based, or courseware projects for the teaching of art history. Under the direction of an art history faculty member, students undertake a specific computer-based technology project, gaining or using skills in software with particular relevance to the teaching of art or architectural history. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or above; permission of instructor; approval of department chair. Pass/fail only. 1 credit. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits. Only 2 credits may count toward the art history major or minor. (F-S,Y)

376-30600 The Romantic Movement in British Art and Architecture   FA LA

     A study of the Romantic Movement in British art and architecture, 1790-1837. The course includes an analysis of the period's styles in painting and architecture, of the ideas that inspired them, and of the society that produced them. Emphasis is placed on first-hand study of buildings and works of art. Visits to galleries and museums; field trips. Prerequisites: One course in art history; two additional courses in the humanities and/or fine arts; sophomore standing or above. Offered only through the London Center. 3 credits. (S,Y)

376-30700 Victorian Art and Society   HU LA

     A study of painting, costume, furniture, and monuments in terms of artistic and social value. Field trips and visits to museums and galleries. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts; sophomore standing or above. Offered only through the London Center. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-31800 Memorable Cities   FA LA

     An investigation of the architecture and urban design of cities distinguished by their physical beauty or by their status as political, religious, or cultural capitals (e.g., Paris, Rome, Moscow, St. Petersburg, New York, Washington, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Kyoto). The objectives of the course are twofold: (1) to explore the components of successful city design by analyzing architectural ensembles and urban patterns, and (2) to analyze the ways in which political and cultural values are expressed in urban form. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (O)

376-32000 Sculpture at First Hand   FA LA

    An issues-oriented course dealing with actual sculpture on the Ithaca College and Cornell campuses. Discussions center on controversial issues, such as the public funding of outdoor sculpture, originals versus copies, and restoration and preservation. The course also addresses technical problems and historical issues. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts, including at least one art history course; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-33100 Studies in Art from Ancient to Renaissance   FA/HU LA

    Advanced studies of focused issues in the history of ancient, medieval, or Renaissance art. Specific course topic varies. May be repeated for credit for different topics. Prerequisites: Three courses in the fine arts or humanities, including at least one art history course; sophomore standing or above. Further prerequisites may be added according to the topic. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-33600 Late Renaissance Art in Italy   HU LA

     A study of the painting and sculpture of Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, and other Italian artists of the 16th century. High Renaissance, mannerism, and the golden age of Venice are discussed as concepts, and works are considered in a cultural context. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts, including one art history course; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-34100 Women Artists and Cultural Change   HU LA

     A survey of women artists working from the Renaissance to the present with an emphasis placed on the interconnections between feminism and women's art. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (E)

376-34200 Images of Women in Western Art   HU LA

     An examination of women as subject matter in Western art and the cultural attitudes that various images of women reflect. Goddesses, saints, witches, queens, prostitutes, and mothers are among the topics of discussion. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (O)

376-35000 Studies in Art from Baroque to Modern   FA/HU LA

    Advanced studies of focused issues in art from the period between the 17th century and the present. Specific course topic varies. May be repeated for credit for different topics. Prerequisites: Three courses in the fine arts or humanities, including at least one art history course; sophomore standing or above. Further prerequisites may be added according to topic. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-35800 Form, Function, and Fantasy: Architecture since 1945   HU LA

     The decades since World War II have been a time of extraordinary freedom and exploration in architecture and the most intense period of building in the history of the planet. In what direction is architecture headed? This course considers this question and related issues by examining recent and current architecture of Europe, the Western hemisphere, and the Far East. Prerequisites: Three courses in the fine arts or humanities, including at least one art history course; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-37500 Selected Topics in Art History   FA/HU LA

    This course may be repeated for credit for different selected topics. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-38000 Studies in Architectural History and Theory   FA/HU LA

    Advanced studies of focused issues in the history of architecture and architectural theory. Specific course topic varies. May be repeated for credit for different topics. Prerequisites: Three courses in the fine arts or humanities, including at least one art history course; sophomore standing or above. Further prerequisites may be added according to the topic. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-38100 Art and Architecture of Washington, D.C.   FA LA

    Examines the art and architecture of Washington, D.C., and its major institutions. Emphasizes understanding the architecture and art of the capital city as expressions of the political, social, and moral values of the nation and of Western culture in general. Lectures and related class tours explore three major categories of Washington's visual cultural environment: museum highlights; public sculpture, monuments and memorials; and architecture. Assignments encourage the study of various objects and sites from a critical perspective, and give each student the opportunity to conduct primary research at select Washington libraries and archives. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts; sophomore standing or above. Offered only through the Washington Semester Program. 3 credits. (F-S,Y)

376-38600 American Painting: Landscape into History   HU LA

    Introduction to the rich and varied artistic tradition of the American landscape. Covers American painting spanning the late-18th through mid-20th centuries, with special concentration on representational art. Since the early 19th century, landscapes painted by Americans have displayed strongly fanciful elements, but have carried historical and political connotations as well. The themes of wilderness, civilization, and progress are among the topics central to many of these works. Prerequisites: Three courses in the fine arts or humanities, including at least one art history course; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-39000 Introduction to Museology   FA LA

     Critically examines the significance of museological practice today; explores different museological strategies in conjunction with the history of collecting and exhibiting; and examines the limitations on what can be exhibited in a museum. The question whether museums operate as homogenizing institutions is also addressed. In addition, in collaboration with the Handwerker Gallery, incorporates a practical component to introduce students to museographical ideas. Prerequisites: Three courses in art history; sophomore standing or above. 3 credits. (IRR)

376-49000 Seminar in Art History   FA/HU LA

    A central topic with class discussion, individual research, and presentation of papers as major parts of the course. This course may be repeated for credit for seminar topics on different subjects. 3 credits. (F-S,Y)

376-49400 Internship   NLA

     The internship provides an opportunity to gain practical experience working in a gallery or museum, under the joint supervision of a member of the museum staff and an Ithaca College faculty member. Internships are arranged individually at the student's request, subject to the availability of an appropriate museum or gallery slot. Prerequisites: Three art history courses; sophomore standing or above; permission of instructor. 1-4 credits. (IRR)

376-49500 Internship in Washington, D.C.   NLA

     The internship in Washington, D.C. provides an opportunity to gain practical experience in the fields of art and architectural history, under the joint supervision of a site supervisor and an Ithaca College faculty member. Internships are arranged through the Washington Semester Program and are subject to the availability of appropriate placement. Prerequisites: Three art history courses; sophomore standing or above; permission of the instructor. Offered only through the Washington Semester Program. 1-6 credits; only four of these credits may count toward the art history major or minor. (F-S,Y)

376-49700 Independent Study   FA/HU LA

    Program of special reading and research under the supervision of a specialist in art history. Offered only on demand and by special permission. 1-4 credits. (IRR)

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