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Ithaca College Undergraduate Catalog 2002-2003

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Sociology

    Bachelor of Arts

    Jonathan Laskowitz, Associate Professor and Chair

    Students pursuing a degree in sociology in the School of Humanities and Sciences explore the complex dynamics that exist between individuals, their collective identity, and actions in groups, and the social codes and behavioral patterns of larger local, national, and global human structures.

    How do societies change? What makes social order possible? What are the sources of conflict in society? How is power exercised and how is ideology used to control people? How do people organize to create change? How do racial and ethnic prejudices develop and become entrenched in society? How do we define human sexuality and sexual norms? How has the family unit evolved over time?

    These are the kinds of questions students grapple with in courses in the sociology major at Ithaca College. In the process, they come to a deeper understanding of their own values and societal roles, and begin to see how they can effect changes in individual behaviors and in society at large.

    Faculty in the sociology department work closely with students to help them develop skills in writing and analysis, computer usage, and research methods. Students develop their own interests through internships in real-world settings and through close collaboration with faculty in independent study projects.

    In addition, the department offers a social work program -- an applied program leading to a minor in social work. Prerequisite courses in the minor include psychology, sociology, economics, and public policy and welfare. Practice-oriented courses, such as Social Welfare and Social Work, have a fieldwork component to provide practical experience.

    Sociology majors receive broad training in the discipline and in a concentration in one of six major subfields described below.

    Requirements for the Major in Sociology -- B.A.

    General requirements -- The requirements for the sociology major are 21 prescribed credits in general and fundamental studies and statistics; 21 elective credits, including one "focused studies" sequence or concentration; and 78 credits in open electives. Majors must take no fewer than 9 credits at level 4 in sociology, At least 3 credits of level 4 must be a departmental course numbered 331-40100 to 331-46900, excluding 331-46300 and no more than 3 credits from coursework related to being a teaching assistant in 331-48000, 331-48100, and 331-48200, and no more than 3 credits of internship credit from 331-49000 to 331-49800 toward the level 4 requirement. For graduation, 120 credits are required as follows:

    Credits in the major

331-10100

Introduction to Sociology

3

331-31100

Sociological Theory

3

331-35300

Research Methods I

3

331-35400

Research Methods II

3

    Courses in Foundations of Sociological Inquiry (choose two)

331-20400

Sociology of Signs, Symbols, and Collective Beliefs

 

331-20600

Urban Sociology

 

331-20700

Race and Ethnicity

 

331-20800

Social Change

 

331-21300

Sexual Oppression

 

331-29300

Introduction to Social Institutions and Organizations

 

331-31300

Social Inequality

 

331-31800

Political Sociology

6

 

Total, required credits

18

 

Sociology electives

21

 

Total, sociology requirements

39

    Credits outside sociology

313-15500

Basic Statistical Reasoning, or equivalent statistics course

3

 

Total, outside credits

3

    Students must also complete one of the concentrations listed below. The concentration may include courses from either the 18 credits of required sociology courses or the 21 credits of sociology electives.

 

Total, requirements

42

 

Open electives

78

 

Total, B.A. in sociology

120

    Foundations of Sociological Inquiry

    This cluster of courses, listed above, provides background in broad institutional structures and societal processes. It also introduces students to the more specialized areas of study embraced by the concentrations.

    Focused Studies (Concentrations)
    Criminal and juvenile justice studies

    Students consider theories and data on crime, juvenile delinquency, deviance, the law, policing, and forms of punishment. In examining these phenomena, they become familiar with the ways in which individuals and institutions are shaped by historical, political, and

    economic forces, and they learn much about our social order and their lives within it. Students who graduate with this concentration often go on to study and practice law, enter programs for a master's degree in criminal justice planning, work in law enforcement at the local, state, or federal level, work with at-risk youth, or become counselors and therapists.

331-20300

Juvenile Delinquency

3

331-30200

Sociology of Crime

3

      Select one from the following

331-21400

Definitions of Normality

 

331-21500

Introduction to Contemporary Mental Health Issues

3

      Select one from the following

331-30700

Social Policy

 

331-32200

Forms of Punishment

 

331-32300

Family Violence

 

331-32400

Sociology of Violence

 

331-33200

Selected Topics in Criminal and Juvenile Justice Studies

3

    Select one from the following

331-41500

Seminar: The Police

 

331-41800

Seminar: Sociology of Law

 

331-43200

Selected Topics in Criminal and Juvenile Justice Studies

 

331-44200

Tutorial in Criminal and Juvenile Justice Studies

 

331-47200

Independent Studies in Criminal and Juvenile Justice Studies

 

331-46300

Field Research

 

331-49200

Internship in Criminal and Juvenile Justice Studies

3

    Clinical sociology

    Courses in this concentration help students examine the relation between "personal problems" and the larger societal structure. Students learn about theories behind counseling, intervention strategies, effective listening skills, and helping relationships. The clinical sociology concentration and the minor in social work prepare students for entry-level positions in human services or for immediate placement in graduate schools of social work. Many students who graduate in this field become professionals in educational or mental health settings.

    Select one from the following

331-21400

Definitions of Normality

 

331-21500

Introduction to Contemporary Mental Health Issues

3

    Select one from the following

331-30800

Counseling Theory and Dynamics

 

331-30900

Group Counseling

3

    Select one from the following

331-30700

Social Policy (Students who minor in social work may not use 331-30700 or 331-36100 to fulfill the requirements for a concentration in clinical sociology.)

 

331-32300

Family Violence

 

331-36100

Social Welfare and Social Work

 

331-37000

Counseling the Older Adult

3

    Select one from the following

331-41400

Seminar: Mental Health Interventions

 

331-41600

Seminar: Treatment and Prevention of Family Violence

 

331-43000

Selected Topics in Clinical Sociology

 

331-48800

Counseling the Older Adult: Research

3

    Select one from the following

331-44000

Tutorial in Clinical Sociology

 

331-46300

Field Research

 

331-47000

Independent Studies in Clinical Sociology

 

331-49000

Internship in Clinical Sociology

3

    Gender studies

    Students pursuing this concentration look at how male and female humans come to be defined as men and women, and examine the socially constructed relationships between them. Courses focus on the history and current aspects of gender inequality as manifested in sexuality and interpersonal relationships, health care, work, and the family. Gender is explored with an emphasis on race, class, and sexual orientation. This in-depth analysis of an issue of growing concern throughout our society leads to opportunities for graduate study or career paths in business or human services.

331-34300

Sociology of Gender

3

    Select two from the following

331-21000

Women's Lives

 

331-21300

Sexual Oppression

 

331-22800

Men's Lives

6

    Select one from the following

331-31600

Women and Health

 

331-32300

Family Violence

 

331-32500

Race, Class, and Gender

 

331-32700

Work and the Family

3

    Select one from the following

331-41900

Seminar: Women in the Third World

 

331-42500

Seminar: Sociological Feminist Theory

 

331-42700

Seminar: Class, Gender, and Work

 

331-43100

Selected Topics in Gender Studies

3

    Race and ethnic relations

    In this concentration, students engage in the formal analysis of policies, laws, and social movements related to race and ethnic issues. They investigate racial and cultural diversity in the United States and in other societies, including patterns of racial and ethnic stratification. Many students focusing on this area become involved in activities aimed at overcoming inequalities in our society. The study of race and ethnic relations forms a strong foundation for many careers and graduate programs in our global society.

331-20700

Race and Ethnicity

3

    Select one from the following

331-22600

Sociology of Hispanic Americans

 

331-23300

Selected Topics in Race and Ethnic Relations

3

    Select one from the following

331-30300

Global Race and Ethnic Relations

 

331-34100

Minorities in the United Kingdom

 

331-31200

Culture and Society: An International Field Experience

3

    Select one from the following

331-31000

Civil Rights and Social Movements

 

331-31300

Social Inequality

 

331-32500

Race, Class, and Gender

 

331-37600

Poverty

3

    Select one from the following

331-41900

Seminar: Women in the Third World

 

331-42100

Seminar: Race, Racism, and the Law

 

331-43300

Selected Topics in Race and Ethnic Relations

 

331-44300

Tutorial in Race and Ethnic Relations

3

    Sociology of family and relationships

    This concentration provides students with a critical look at the nature of the family and relationships in historical, cross-cultural, and sociological contexts. Students investigate specific economic, political, psychological, and demographic factors that both affect and are affected by changing family and relationship arrangements. By focusing on these particular issues, students prepare themselves for graduate study and work with families, either in the field of domestic violence or as counselors in other human service areas.

331-29200

The Changing Family

3

331-32300

Family Violence

3

    Select two from the following

331-21800

Individual and Society

 

331-22000

Sociology of Aging

 

331-30600

Space of Intimacy

 

331-32700

Work and the Family

 

331-33400

Selected Topics in Sociology of Family and Relationships

 

331-37000

Counseling the Older Adult

6

    Select one from the following

331-41600

Seminar: Treatment and Prevention of Family Violence

 

331-42200

Seminar: Family Forms

 

331-48800

Counseling the Older Adult: Research

 

331-44400

Tutorial in Sociology of Families and Relationships

 

331-47400

Independent Study in Sociology of Family and Relationships

3

    Social institutions and organizations

    This concentration is designed for students interested in health care systems, education, the workplace, or religious institutions. Students investigate how power and ideology affect those who act in institutions and organizations, either as authority figures or as clients. They also explore the nature of bureaucracy and how it affects us all in a bureaucratized society. Sociology majors who concentrate in this area are prepared to pursue additional training and careers in a wide range of fields, including health education or administration, health advocacy, teaching, labor relations, and business.

331-29300

Introduction to Social Institutions and Organizations

3

    Select three from the following (At least one course must be at level 2, and at least one course must be at the level 3.)

331-21200

Sociology of Work

 

331-21900

Sociology of Religious Institutions

 

311-22000

Sociology of Aging

 

331-29200

The Changing Family

 

331-30100

Technology and Society

 

331-31400

Sociology of Health and Medicine

 

331-31600

Women and Health

 

331-31800

Political Sociology

 

331-32200

Forms of Punishment

 

331-32700

Work and the Family

 

331-35100

Sociology of Education

9

    Select one from the following

331-41200

Seminar: The National Health System

 

331-41500

Seminar: The Police

 

331-42700

Seminar: Class, Gender, and Work

 

331-42800

Simulating Social Processes

 

331-43500

Selected Topics in Social Institutions and Organizations

 

331-44500

Tutorial in Social Institutions and Organizations

 

331-47500

Independent Studies in Social Institutions and Organizations

 

331-49500

Internship in Social Institutions and Organizations

3

    Requirements for the Minor in Sociology

331-10100

Introduction to Sociology or

 

331-10200

Contemporary Social Issues

3

 

Foundations of Sociological Inquiry

6

 

Level-3 sociology courses

6

 

Level-4 sociology courses

6

 

Total

21

    Social Work Program

    The social work program is an applied program leading to an 18-credit minor in social work. The sequence includes prerequisite courses in psychology, sociology, and economics, and then background courses in public policy and the economic aspects of public welfare. The first practice-oriented course is Social Welfare and Social Work, which has a fieldwork component. This is followed by Methods of Social Work and a 3-credit supervised fieldwork course. Additional electives round out the concentration. The minor provides academic and practical experience as preparation for employment or for graduate studies. Details are available from the coordinator of the social work program.

    Requirements for the minor in social work

    Prerequisites

331-10100

Introduction to Sociology

3

330-10400

Introduction to Developmental Psychology or

 

330-20400

Principles of Developmental Psychology

3

306-12200

Principles of Microeconomics (may be taken with 306-26200 Economics of Welfare Policies)

3

    Requirements

331-30700

Social Policy

3

306-26200

Economics of Welfare Policies

3

331-36100

Social Welfare and Social Work

3

331-34600

Methods of Social Work Practice

3

 

and concurrently,

 

331-34700

Supervised Fieldwork

3

 

Social work elective

3

 

Total

27

    Individualized Study Opportunities

    Field research experiences are provided in many departmental courses and can be pursued as independent study or internship projects. Field placements are available in a variety of local settings, including the Ithaca Youth Bureau, Southside Community Center, Tompkins County Social Services, Cayuga Medical Center at Ithaca, Prisoners Legal Services Offender Aid and Restoration, and Tompkins County Probation Department.

    Independent study experience is arranged between the professor and student. Some more recent examples of this option include projects on eco-justice in Ithaca, community control and development, women and alcohol, economic opportunity centers, intimacy and children, solar-age construction, alternative communities, organizational analysis of local banks and insurance companies, studies in student life, and ethnic conflict in the Virgin Islands.

    Internships

    Internships are designed to provide students with a supervised and structured experience. Often these can be arranged by students and specific agencies in communities around the country. The sociology department believes that internships provide an opportunity to obtain work experience, and to analyze the social and political context of the specific agency. An example is the Tompkins County Probation Department internship.

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A. Ozolins, Office of Publications, 21. October, 2002