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Index

Ithaca College Undergraduate Catalog 2005-2006

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History Courses

311-10100 Foundations of Western Civilization   HU LA 1, h, g

    Introduction to the development of Western civilization from its heritage in the ancient world to the early modern age of the 17th or 18th centuries. Major political, socioeconomic, and cultural trends are examined. Students may not receive credit for both 311-10100 and 311-18100. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor. Also offered through the London Center. 3 credits. (F,Y)

311-10200 Modern Western Civilization   HU LA 1, h, g

    Continuation of 311-10100, extending from the early modern period to the present. Students may not receive credit for both 311-10200 and 311-18200. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor. Also offered through the London Center. 3 credits. (S,Y)

311-10500 News of the Day   HU LA h, g

    Contemporary problems as they appear in the media, with research and discussion of the historical background of crises. Daily discussion of current news and in-depth studies of ongoing problems of note. 3 credits. (F-S,Y)

311-11100 United States History to 1865   HU LA 1, h

    A survey of United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. Included are our European heritage, problems of colonial settlement, the achievement of political independence and stability, territorial expansion, industrialization, and the struggle over slavery. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F,Y)

311-11200 United States History since 1865   HU LA 1, h

    A survey of national development since the Civil War, with a particular emphasis placed on social and economic development, overseas expansion, social and political reform movements, involvement in two world wars, and the Cold War. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor. 3 credits. (S,Y)

311-15100 The Past Is Present: The Relevance of History   HU LA

    People tend quite naturally to think in present terms and see the world as it is around them. The present, however, does not exist independently of the past. This course uses a series of videotapes, readings, and group discussions to link the past to the present in a variety of ways. 3 credits. (F,Y)

311-18100 World Civilization I   HU LA 1, h, g

    A comparative survey of world civilizations from the beginnings of humanity to the age of exploration in the 16th century. Considers the nature of early hunting-gathering societies, the impact of agriculture, the introduction of metallurgy (bronze and iron), and the evolution of civilizations in Eurasia, Africa, and the New World. Students may not receive credit for both 311-18100 and 311-10100. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F,Y)

311-18200 World Civilization II   HU LA 1, h, g

    Continuation of 311-18100, extending from the age of exploration in the 16th century to the present. Considers a "world made one" by the voyages of Columbus and others, the expansion of contacts into the 20th century, and the possible development of a global civilization. Students may not receive credit for both 311-18200 and 311-10200. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor. 3 credits. (S,Y)

311-18500-311-18600 Selected Topics: Historical Studies   HU LA

    Occasional courses of an experimental nature are offered under these numbers and title. These may be of lecture or seminar format, of great breadth or highly specialized. There is no prerequisite. This course may be repeated for credit for selected topics on different subjects. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-20300 Introductory Geography   SS LA 1, g

    Introduction to geography, emphasizing both the physical and cultural elements in the distribution patterns of human activity. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. May not be taken to fulfill history course requirements. 3 credits. (O,E)

311-20900 Ethnic United States since the Civil War   HU LA 1, h

    Explores the cultures and social structures that various immigrant groups brought to the United States, their interaction with the dominant Anglo-Saxon culture, and the kind of multiethnic society the United States has built (melting pot or tossed salad). Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,Y)

311-21000 The United States Labor Movement   HU LA 1, h

    Explores labor history from 1840 to the 1970s. Based on two premises: first, that labor history is an essential ingredient to the understanding of American history; and second, that labor history must extend beyond traditional union history into the lives and aspirations of the workers themselves. Thus, the course looks beyond the union halls into the homes and hearts of the men and women who have built America. Prerequisites: 311-11200, or one American history course at or above level 2, or one course in business or economics above level 1; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-21100 The United States and Vietnam 1945-1990   HU LA

    Through readings, films, and student research, explores the history of the United States' involvement in Southeast Asia from World War II to 1990. It emphasizes the origins and reason for the Vietnam War, the impact of the war on all participants, and the aftermath of the defeat of the U.S. effort. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,Y)

311-22100 Russian History   HU LA 1, h, g

    Russian history from antiquity to the 1917 revolution. Emphasis is placed on political, social, and intellectual developments. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (F,Y)

311-22200 Rise and Fall of the USSR   HU LA 1, h, g

    A study of Soviet ideology and politics from the 1917 revolution to the present, emphasizing the cause of the system's disintegration. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,Y)

311-23100 The Ancient World: Greece and Rome   HU LA 1, h, g

    Introduction to the study of Egyptian and Greco-Roman civilization, including a general survey of political institutions and social and economic life. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-23200 Medieval Civilization   HU LA 1, h, g

    Major emphasis is placed on the course of events in Europe and the Near East from the 4th through the 15th centuries, with particular stress on the major institutional and cultural developments. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-23500 The Discovery of the World   HU LA 1, h, g

    A consideration of the prerequisites of transoceanic voyages and an investigation of why, among the societies that developed oceanic maritime capabilities, it was Europe that "discovered" the world. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-24300 The City in United States History   HU LA 1, h

    The United States city: its development and impact on American society from the colonial period to the present. Changes in structure and function of the city in United States history and the effect of these changes on the lives of urban dwellers and American society in general. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (O,E)

311-25200 Germany 1918-1945   HU LA 1, h, g

    A survey of German history 1918-1945, beginning with the post-World War I situation; the inception of the Weimar Republic and the political and economic challenges it faced; the artistic and cultural flowering during this period; the onset of the Hitler dictatorship; and the development of policies and their implementation to the debacle of the Third Reich in 1945. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-25500 Native American History   HU LA

    Covers Native American issues since 1492. This historical approach will acquaint students with the major events and processes that transformed Native American communities across the North American continent. Students will review the political, social, economic, and religious changes that took place as a result of native interactions with Euro-Americans and various government agencies since colonial times. Students will also address how Native Americans were represented by non-native peoples and how these images (and misrepresentations) changed over time. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-26100 The Middle East   HU LA 1, h, g

    An overview of the political, cultural, intellectual, social, and religious background of the Middle East to the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire in the early 20th century. Also includes a concise examination of the modern Middle East and the varied regional problems and tensions deriving from historical forces. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-26500 Industrialization and Social Change in Modern Europe   HU LA 1, h

    Examines the alteration of European social class, material culture, and ideology arising from the technological changes of the industrial age. Emphasizes the process of change and its consequences, from the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution to the aftermath of World War II. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-26600 Women in Western Society   HU LA 1, h

    Explores the variety of women's roles in the culture and society of the West and the historical evolution of Western society's attitudes toward women. Emphasizes forces affecting attitudes toward women, including economic, political, and social conditions as well as religious, intellectual, and scientific assumptions. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-26800 Introduction to Japanese Culture   HU LA 1, h, g

    This interdisciplinary, team-taught introduction to the history and culture of Japan incorporates history, art history, literature, geography, religion, and contemporary affairs to create an understanding of Japan from its origins to the present. Prerequisites: One course in the fine arts, humanities, or social sciences; sophomore standing. Students may not earn credit for both 311-26800 and 376-26800. 3 credits. (O)

311-27000 History of American Environmental Thought   HU LA 1,h

    A pervasive theme in the occupancy of North America is the changing and often conflicting perception of the environment. This course focuses on the history of environmental ideas, values, and attitudes. Topics include capitalist, Romantic, and ecological thinking; the goals of conservation and preservation; recent rethinking of primitive experience; and today's dialogue between mainstream environmentalism and deep ecology, the latter including ecofeminism, sustainable development, and biodiversity. Students examine the profound impact each of the paradigms has had on human-environment relations in America. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-27200 History of the Future   HU LA 1, h

    An examination of historical perceptions and visions of the future. Utopian thought and societies, science and technology, war and peace, the environment, and gender relations are the historical themes assessed. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-27300 Twentieth-Century Global Revolutions   HU LA 1, h, g

    An exploration of ideas, concepts, and backgrounds of world revolutions in the 20th century. Using various models of revolution in Europe, Asia, Africa, and other parts of the world, the course emphasizes culture as the leading influence in modern revolutions. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (F,Y)

311-27500 The History of United States Popular Culture   HU LA 1, h

     Explores the history of popular culture in the United States from the earliest mass media genres to the contemporary era, including minstrelsy, novels, photography, baseball, movies, radio, and television. Emphasis is placed upon a number of important themes in American social history and how they affected popular culture differently in different eras -- gender roles, race, and the role of changing technology. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-28300 Wars, Revolutions, and the Holocaust   HU LA

    Through readings, films, discussions, and lectures, this course explores the ethical, theoretical, and historical aspects of three major violence-ridden developments of the 20th century: wars, revolutions, and the Holocaust. A major goal of the course is to understand the causes of these events. Topics include the theory and technology of modern warfare, Leninist theory as a model for revolution, and the development of anti-Semitism in Germany, Russia, and France. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (Y)

311-28500, 311-28600 Selected Topics: Historical Studies   HU LA

    Occasional courses of an experimental nature are offered under these numbers and title. These may be of lecture or seminar format, of great breadth or highly specialized. Any added prerequisites are announced when printed descriptions of the study topic are distributed. May be repeated for credit for selected topics on different subjects. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-29000 The History of United States Foreign Relations   HU LA 1, h

    Survey of the prejudices, values, and ideologies that lie behind U.S. foreign policy. Course covers relations with major states and areas of the world from the origins of the nation until the post-Cold War era. Special attention is given to the relationship between social, economic, and political changes in the United States and their effect on foreign relations over time. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (F,O)

311-29900 Independent Study   U LA

     Special research on an individual project arranged by a student with a particular faculty member. The project may include reading books and/or writing papers under the guidance of the faculty member, with a performance expectation of sophomore-level work. Offered on demand only. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or equivalent. 1-3 credits.

311-30100 The Renaissance and Reformation   HU LA 1, h, g

    Consideration of the major trends in world history between 1409 and 1660, including the Renaissance, the expansion of Europe, the development of the modern state system, and the Protestant revolts. Also included are major developments in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-30200 The Old Regime and the French Revolution   HU LA 1, h, g

    Political, social, and intellectual upheaval in 17th- and 18th-century Europe. Rise and decline of absolutism and the age of revolution. Napoleon prior to 1814. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-30300 The Colonial Period of American History: 1607-1763   HU LA

    Intensive examination of the origins of American culture and society (family, community, social structure). Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (F,O)

311-30400 The Late Colonies and the Early National Period, 1763-1815   HU LA

    Survey of the movement for independence; the political experiments that led to the federal Constitution; and the early national period. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,O)

311-30700 The United States as a World Power I, 1900-1945   HU LA

    Intensive study of the elements that have made the United States a dominant force in world affairs. Probes the reform impulse of the Progressive Era and New Deal, the complex 1920s, and the impact of both world wars on American society. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (F,E)

311-30800 The United States as a World Power II, 1945 to the Present   HU LA

    Emphasizes the interrelationships between foreign and domestic policy since World War II. Special attention to the Cold War, McCarthyism, the 1950s ethos, the chaotic 1960s and Vietnam, and the reaction to the Nixon years and after. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,E)

311-31000 The American Frontier: 1840-1890   HU LA

    A cross-disciplinary perspective on the process of settlement into the trans-Mississippi West, drawing from women's studies, social theory, anthropology, literature, and geography. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-31300 The Other Europe: Modern Eastern and Central Europe   HU LA 1, h, g

    Examines events and developments in Eastern and Central Europe from 1945 through the end of the Cold War. The course reviews the region's historical-cultural background, but concentrates on governance, ideology, politics, economics, society, and culture during the past 50 years. Special focus on the development of independent dissident activities, their challenge to dominant authoritarian models during the period, and the future of the region in a changing Europe. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-31800 Toward Democracy: Early Modern European Intellectual History   HU LA 1, h

    Explores the growth of Western democratic theory, political philosophy, and intellectual history from the time of the late Roman Empire to the late 18th century. Included are such topics as the theory of absolutism and its foundation in the Roman law, common law and democracy, papal absolutism, Puritanism, and the Enlightenment. Also considered are Locke, Rousseau, Machiavelli, and Guicciardini. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-32000 The United States and the Third World   HU LA

    An examination of the role of the United States in the modern history and cultural evolution of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America. Course includes study of the attitudes, influences, and actions of the United States regarding the nations and peoples of these areas in the 19th and 20th centuries. A search for the forces that explain the understanding, or misunderstanding, of third-world cultures by people in the United States. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,O)

311-32100 Colonial Latin America   HU LA 1, h, g

    An examination of ancient American civilizations establishes the context for the Spanish conquest and the imposition of Iberian culture in the development of Spanish colonies. The course continues with the international setting of the colonies and the development of newly independent states in the 19th century. The emphasis is placed not only on events but also on their meaning, focusing on the history and culture of Latin America, and their influences on contemporary Latin American society. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-32200 Modern Latin America   HU LA 1, h, g

    To promote an understanding of contemporary Latin America, the course examines the politics, social structures, and cultures of the region in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Revolutionary movements and their relationships to the United States are central, as are the political traditions influencing the evolution of modern Latin America. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,O)

311-32500 United States Business History   HU LA

    United States business history from 1815 to 1960: a study of the development of the vertically integrated corporation and its social and political impact on American society. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-33800 European Diplomatic History from 1870   HU LA

    Survey of European diplomatic history from the Franco-Prussian War to the present. Includes the outbreak of World War I, the Peace of Paris, the background of World War II, and the post-Korean War period. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-34100 Dynastic China   HU LA 1, h, g

    China, from its origins to the 19th century: a historical survey utilizing literary and philosophical material and selected dynasties to illustrate the development and diversity of China. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-34200 Japan   HU LA

    Japan, from its origins to the 20th century: a historical survey drawing on literary sources and social forms to illustrate the development of Japan and its role in world affairs. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-35100 English History to 1714   HU LA

    Study of English history, principally in the Tudor and Stuart periods: the early Tudors, the culture and institutions of Elizabethan England, the religious and political struggle of Stuart and Cromwellian England. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-35300 Ancient Greece   HU LA 1, h, g

    Study of topics in the history of ancient Greek civilization, from the archaic age through the time of the Hellenistic monarchies. Both ancient and modern sources are sampled extensively. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-35700 Studies in French History   HU LA

    Study of selected periods of French history in depth, with an emphasis placed on the social, cultural, economic, and intellectual history of the selected period, as well as the political framework that helped determine it. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,E)

311-36100 History of Marxism   HU LA

    Intensive study of the evolution of the Marxist movement and thought, from its inception to the present. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-36200 Modern European Intellectual History   HU LA 1, h, g

    A survey of European thought in the modern era, exploring in depth contemporary scientific, religious, aesthetic, and existentialist ideas. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. Also offered through the London Center (F-S,Y). 3 credits. (IRR)

311-37100 Slavery and the Union   HU LA 1, h

    A study of the institution of slavery and its impact on United States history from the colonial period to 1900. Emphasis is placed on the coming of the Civil War, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-38100 Europe in the 19th Century   HU LA

    A study of the unfolding of European economic, political, and social institutions, and cultural and intellectual heritage from the end of the Napoleonic period until the end of the century. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (F,O)

311-38200 Europe in the 20th Century   HU LA

    A study of European economic, political, and social institutions, and Europe's cultural and intellectual heritage from the turn of the century to the present. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (S,O)

311-38300 Revolutionary China   HU LA

    Study of China and its passage from Celestial Empire to Communist Republic through two world wars and two revolutions. The assumptions and realities of China are considered, as well as the processes that led to them. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-38500, 311-38600 Selected Topics: Historical Studies   HU LA

    Occasional courses of an experimental nature are offered under this number and title. These may be of lecture or seminar format, of great breadth or highly specialized. Any prerequisites are announced when printed descriptions of the study topic are distributed. This course may be repeated for credit for selected topics on different subjects. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. 3 credits. (IRR)

311-39500 British History 1815-1914   HU LA

    British history is discussed with major emphasis placed on England in 1815. The Great Reform Act, Robert Peel, Palmerston, Gladstone, trade unions, Ireland, imperialism, liberalism 1906-14, Parliament versus Lords, and causes of World War I are discussed. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. Offered only through the London Center. 3 credits. (F,Y)

311-39600 Modern British History 1914 to Present   HU LA

    Great Britain's role in Europe and the East since World War I. Major emphasis is placed on British foreign policy and the figures of Lloyd George, Chamberlain, Churchill, MacMillan, and Wilson. Prerequisites: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing. Offered only through the London Center. 3 credits. (S,Y)

311-39900 Independent Study   U LA

     Special research on an individual project arranged by a student with a particular faculty member. The project may include reading books and/or writing papers under the guidance of the faculty member, with a performance expectation of junior-level work. Offered on demand only. Prerequisites: Junior standing, or equivalent. 1-3 credits.

311-481xx History Seminar, European   HU LA

    Introduction to problems of historical method and research in European history. Must be taken at home campus. Prerequisites: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F-S,Y)

311-482xx History Seminar, Global   HU LA

    Introduction to problems of historical method and research in global history. Must be taken at home campus. Prerequisites: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F-S,Y)

311-48300 History Seminar, United States   HU LA

    Introduction to problems of historical method and research in United States history. Must be taken at home campus. Prerequisites: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F-S,Y)

311-49100 Tutorial in Special Problems in European History   HU LA

     Guided individual research, study, and writing on particular topics in European history under the supervision of a faculty member of the department. Must be taken at home campus. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F-S)

311-492xx Tutorial in Special Problems in Global History   HU LA

    Guided individual research, study, and writing on particular topics in global history under the supervision of a faculty member of the department. Must be taken at home campus. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F-S)

311-49300 Tutorial in Special Problems in United States History   HU LA

    Guided individual research, study, and writing on particular topics in United States history under the supervision of a faculty member from the department. Must be taken at home campus. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. 3 credits. (F-S)

311-49500 History Internship   NLA

    An opportunity for practical experience in a variety of history-related activities in the United States, under the joint supervision of the sponsoring agency and a history department faculty member. Internships are arranged individually and must be approved by the chair of the history department. Prerequisites: Four history courses; junior standing or above; permission of instructor and chair. Available for variable credit; only 6 credits may be counted toward the history major. (IRR)

311-49700 International History Internship   NLA

     An opportunity for practical experience in a variety of history-related activities under the joint supervision of the Office of International Programs (London Center) and a history department faculty member on the Ithaca College campus. Internships are arranged individually through the Office of International Programs, but must be approved by the chair of the history department. Prerequisites: Three history courses, two of which are at level 3 or above; permission of instructor and chairperson. 1-4 credits. (IRR)

311-49900 Independent Study   U LA

     Special research on an individual project arranged by a student with a particular faculty member. The project may include reading books and/or writing papers under the guidance of the faculty member, with a performance expectation of senior-level work. Offered on demand only. Prerequisites: Senior standing, or equivalent. 1-3 credits.

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