INTERVIEW: CHILD FLUENCY EVALUATION

CHILD'S AWARENESS OF TALKING AND PROBLEMS TALKING

Note: It is important to identify at this point how the child refers to their talking or talking problem, if it comes up. If the child indicates they "stutter" it is acceptable to use this term, asking the child to describe what they mean by "stuttering". This leads into the next section of the interview. Remember that the interview should help the child put their problem into a meaningful context that they can understand. Thus, the orientation should be towards "talking", "talking problems" or "talking mistakes".

DESCRIPTION OF TALKING PROBLEM (If child is aware of a problem)

Note: At this point the clinician can adopt the vocabulary the child uses to describe their problem. For example, if the child refers to their problem as "stuttering", then the clinician can do likewise. It is often helpful to orient the child to thinking of their problem as a form of talking "mistake" or "bobble".

ANTICIPATION OF STUTTERING

VARIABILITY OF THE PROBLEM

DESCRIPTION OF "FIXING" STRATEGIES

ATTITUDES/PERCEPTIONS/REACTIONS

Listener Awareness and Reactions

Parent (and significant others) Reaction to Stuttering

SEVERITY RATINGS:

The clinician can use different techniques to have the client rate the degree of severity of their problem from both their own point of view, and those of significant others (such as parents).

Self Rating of Perceived Severity

Parent (or other) Rating of Perceived Severity

CHILD'S GOALS AND DESCRIPTION OF "SUCCESSFUL" TALKING

 

Douglas E. Cross, 1996