Courses

Fall 2017

COURSE SUPPLEMENTS FOR

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF CULTURE, RACE, AND ETHNICITY

 

CSCR 10700-01: Introduction to Latino/a Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licon
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This interdisciplinary course explores the varied experiences of Latinos/as in the United States, past and present. Drawing from the disciplines of history, anthropology, literature, women's studies, and ethnic studies, it examines the historical roots of Latino/a, Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, Central, and South American peoples. In particular, it will focus on notions of family, gender, class, race, political economy, language, and sexual identity in relation to public policy and Latino/as' struggles for place and power. Its approach is historical and comparative and it emphasizes the multiplicity of Latino/a experiences as well as the strategic deployment of the term Latino/a.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:10 – 2:25 pm TR

CSCR 11000-01: Introduction to Asian American Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: TBD
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers a critical introduction to Asian American Studies. Focuses on Asian migrations to the U.S., especially in response to labor demands in the 18th -21st centuries. Examines the ways these migrations and subsequent generations of Asian Americans have shaped the economy, racial hierarchies/power, notions of citizenship and cultural belonging, and movements for freedom and autonomy. Discusses the structure and systems of race in the United States as they apply to Asians within a broader context.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 10:00 – 10:50 am MWF

CSCR 12300-01: Introduction to Culture, Race & Ethnicity Concepts
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Paula Ioanide
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students to key concepts in culture, race, and ethnicity studies.  Drawing from cultural studies, comparative ethnic studies, and gender and sexuality studies, it investigates how racial and ethnic identity politics shape institutional and social policies, cultural expressions, and aesthetics, and resistance movements.  Particular attention will be paid to the ways communities of color have negotiated oppression, generated knowledge, and secured dignity and self-determination.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 9:25-10:40 am TR

CSCR 20500-01, -02: Contemporary Issues in Native American/Indigenous Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: TBA
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines what culture is and it explores the roles that culture plays in the lives of individuals and social groups. It looks at what people do, how they explain what they do, and the things they produce as they go about their daily lives. It explores the ways culture affects relationships and behavior within social groups, and the ways it guides interactions between groups.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:00 – 1:50 pm (01) and 2:00 – 2:50 pm (02) MWF

CSCR 25000-01, -02: Hip-Hop Cultures
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Marsha Horsley
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Interrogate the development and growing perspective of Hip-Hop Feminism.  The term Hip-Hop Feminism was coined by Joan Morgan with the release of “When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: A Hip-Hop Feminist Breaks it Down” (1999).  Hip-Hop Feminism emerges as a site of empowerment for women belonging to the Hip-Hop generation.  Providing a space to bring together feminist consciousness and Hip-Hop sensibilities to challenge patriarchy and racism while allowing women to re-imagine a self-politic of love and empowerment through Hip-Hop culture and music.  We will read works by Black women writers and Hip-Hop female performers to explore their cultural and knowledge production as acts of resistance, liberation, and pleasure.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:00 – 1:50 pm (01) and 2:00 -2:50 pm MWF 

CSCR 25600-01: Politics of Whiteness
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Paula Ioanide
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines the emergence of whiteness as a category that determines the distribution of rights and privileges including voting rights, property rights, and the right to own one’s own body. Explores the politics of whiteness in relation to culture, ideology, sexuality, social movements, and cross-racial alliances. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.  (F, Y) 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 10:50 am – 12:05 pm TR

CSCR 26100-01 Watching Race in U.S. Media
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Marsha Horsley
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores how representations of racial and ethnic identities in U.S. film, television, and music influence the construction of political, racial, and gender identities nationally. Investigates how cultural representations of race, ethnicity, and gender are central to the development of U.S. mass culture and consumerism, nationalism, citizenship, and social movements. Particular attention is given to the role of black and Latino/a culture and music in developing strategies of resistance to oppression. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00PM - 5:15 pm MW

CSCR 30501-01 Practicum in Social Change I: Urban Mentorship Initiative
1.5 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Practicum in Social Change I: Urban Mentorship Initiative is an academic mentorship program that offers students the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary, coursework and field-based service-learning aimed at supporting urban youth’s pursuit of higher education.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00 - 5:15 pm TR

CSCR 34500-01: 21st Century Conversations on Race
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines what culture is and it explores the roles that culture plays in the lives of individuals and social groups. It looks at what people do, how they explain what they do, and the things they produce as they go about their daily lives. The course explores how culture shapes and is shaped by the physical environment and how it is used to adapt to that environment. It explores the ways culture affects relationships and behavior within social groups, and the ways it guides interactions between groups. In doing so the course examines and compares a number of cultures of differing scale while paying particular attention to what happens when cultures of different scale interact. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:35 – 3:50 pm TR

CSCR 35200 - Punishment, Prisons, and Democracy
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Paula Ioanide
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores dominant definitions of crime, punishment, and democratic justice in the United States and their relationship to imprisonment. The course begins by examining the historical and ideological roots of the U.S. prison system from slavery to the convict lease system. Focusing on the post-civil rights era, we consider how deindustrialization, the war on drugs, and shifts in policing, welfare policy, sentencing laws, and global militarism have redefined notions of U.S. justice and democracy. The course is attentive to the ways the prison industrial complex disproportionately affects people of color. Prerequisites: Junior standing. (Y)
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:10 – 2:25 pm TR

CSCR 37400 - Latino/a Resistance Movements
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licon
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Focuses on the historical relationships between Latino/as and other racial/ethnic groups in the US and Latin America with special emphasis on social movements and grassroots efforts for social justice from post-WWII to the present. Central theoretical questions will revolve around why resistance movements rise and fall, and how the politics of Latino/a resistance within the United States have historically evolved. In particular, the course will focus on collective Latino/a agency and Latino community attempts to shape their own political and social destiny. Prerequisites: Junior standing. (S,Y)
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00 – 5:15 pm TR

CSCR 43500 - Black Radical Traditions
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Paula Ioanide
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines Black radical philosophies ranging from slavery to the present. Traces shifts and continuities in how Black philosophers have contended with barriers to freedom and emancipation, with a focus on political figures like Harriet Jacobs, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. DuBois, C.L.R. James, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Frantz Fanon, James Baldwin, Angela Y. Davis and Audre Lorde. Explores these writers’ engagement with abolition, existentialism, desegregation, decolonization, and the intersectionalities of race, gender and sexuality, while situating the Black radical tradition within the broader history of U.S. thought, culture and politics. Prerequisites: senior standing. (S, IRR)
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:35 – 3:50 pm TR

 

 

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