Courses

Fall 2015

CSCR 10600 Introduction To African Diaspora Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introductory survey of the major topics and methodologies involved in studying the roots and routes of the African diaspora. Investigation of the physical and cultural movements between Africa and the Americas. Topics include the prominence of Africa in global history; the movement of African people (both voluntary and forced migrations); the enslavement of African peoples in the Americas; cultural aesthetics and identities; colonialism; and resistance. Employs an interdisciplinary approach drawing from disciplines in history, politics, cultural studies, social policy, and sociology. Prerequisites: None. 3 credits (F-S,Y)

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:00PM - 1:50PM MWF
 

CSCR 10700 Introduction To Latino/A Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licón

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This interdisciplinary course explores the varied experiences of Latinos/as in the United States, past and present. Drawing from the disciplines of history, anthropology, literature, women's studies, and ethnic studies, it examines the historical roots of Latino/a, Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, Central, and South American peoples. In particular, it will focus on notions of family, gender, class, race, political economy, language, and sexual identity in relation to public policy and Latino/as' struggles for place and power. Its approach is historical and comparative and it emphasizes the multiplicity of Latino/a experiences as well as the strategic deployment of the term Latino/a. Prerequisites: None. 3 credits. (F-S,Y)

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 10:50AM - 12:05PM TR


CSCR 11000 Introduction to Asian American Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers a critical introduction to Asian American Studies. Focuses on Asian migrations to the U.S., especially in response to labor demands in the 18th -21st centuries. Examines the ways these migrations and subsequent generations of Asian Americans have shaped the economy, racial hierarchies/power, notions of citizenship and cultural belonging, and movements for freedom and autonomy. Discusses the structure and systems of race in the United States as they apply to Asians within a broader context.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 11:00AM - 11:50AM MWF


CSCR 14500 / POLT 14500 Politics of Identity: Race, Ethnicity, Culture
3 Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Asma Barlas

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores the relationship between racial identities and the political-economy of people¹s lives by exploring a set of open-ended questions, such as, is race ³real;² what are the social and psychological implications of thinking in terms of binaries like self/ other, black/white, similarity/ difference; do racial differences matter to the kinds of life chances people get; is color-blindness a form of anti-racism; and, are such questions relevant to your own sense of self? This course is cross-listed; students cannot take both POLT 14500 and CSCR 14500 for credit. Counts as a political theory course for politics majors. 3 credits. (F, Y)

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Class discussions and presentations
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: SECT 1, 9:25AM - 10:40AM TR; SECT 2, 10:50AM - 12:05PM


CSCR 21100 American Gangster
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licón

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will watch a wide variety of American Gangster films with an emphasis on analyzing and deconstructing portrayals of race, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Students will also learn about the social, political, and economic reasons why such criminal organizations (mafias, prison gangs, street gangs, and violent motorcycle clubs) emerge and thrive in the United States. Although this course will examine a multi-ethnic and multi-racial spectrum of gangsters and their portrayal in films, a significant portion of the course will focus on Latinos in the U.S.  Prerequisites: One course in the humanities. 3 credits (S, IRR)

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:35PM - 3:50PM TR


CSCR 30700 Race and Colonialism
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Asma Barlas

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course engages colonialism as a set of racial and material practices that shaped the identities of the colonizers and the colonized as much as it did the global political economy. Three themes in particular will guide our engagement: the racial overtones and undertones of the colonial encounter, especially as embodied in the ideas of discovery, barbarism, and progress; the psychological dynamics of the relationship between the colonizers and the colonized; and the politics of oppression and liberation.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:35PM - 3:50PM TR


CSCR 35001 SELECTED TOPIC: Asian Exiles, Refugees, and Diaspora
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This interdisciplinary class examines in depth Asian migration as an adaptation strategy in the context of major crises such as empire and war. From this perspective, we can better analyze why Asians emigrate, but also why they have settled in faraway lands such as the United States, Latin America, Great Britain, and France. Using methods from history, sociology, anthropology, and cultural studies, this covers both themes and communities, from America’s response to forced migration to refugee memorials to the second generation in exile. This course meets the Comparative & International requirement for the Asian American Studies minor. Prerequisites: sophomore standing. Classes will largely consist of lecture, discussion, multimedia, and activities. Students will be asked to complete a group project due at the end of the semester. This syllabus is tentative in nature and subject to change.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:00PM - 2:50PM MWF


CSCR 37400 Latino/a Resistance Movements
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licón

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course focuses on the historical relationships between Latino/as and other racial/ethnic groups in the US and Latin America with special emphasis on social movements and local grassroots efforts for social justice from post-WWII to the present. Central theoretical questions will revolve around the multi-ethnic alliances and the relationship between civil and human rights, social movements, and state repression. In particular, the course will explore polycultural connections between Chicanos/as and Puerto Ricans and African Americans, American Indians and Latinos/as, as well as Afro-Asian, Latino-Asian, and Anglo-Latino/as.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:10 pm - 2:25 pm TR


CSCR 43300 Education, Oppression, and Liberation
3 Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Interrogates the educational experiences of oppressed people in the African Diaspora. A historical overview of the schools, pedagogies and curriculums developed for Black/Brown students including the political, social, economics and cultural manifestations of "Black education". Additionally, the course examines how educational institutions have been, and can be, used for individual, group and global liberation. Prerequisites: Three courses in the liberal arts or permission of instructor.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00pm - 5:15pm MW


Martin Luther King Scholar Program Courses

 

CSCR 12000  U.S. Civil Rights Seminar
1 credit
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell

Course Description: The primary goal of the course is to introduce students to the history, philosophies, and practices of the civil rights movement in the United States, with a particular focus on the work and writings of Martin Luther King Jr. By utilizing readings, class discussions, and a visit to significant historical landmarks of the movement, students will develop an understanding of the differing approaches to social change and their strategic use within different parts of the modern day civil rights era. In addition, students will build an academic foundation for the required civil rights tour to be held during fall break. The seminar is open to Martin Luther King Jr. Scholar Program participants only. For more information scholars should review the program requirements. Prerequisites: None. 1 Credit. (F, Y

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 6:30PM - 8:00PM W


CSCR 22000 Case Studies in Global Justice
1 credit
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez

This seminar will introduce students in the Martin Luther King Jr. Scholar Program to the study of social justice in an international and comparative context. In general the seminar is designed to engage scholars in analysis, discussion, writing, and action that will contribute to the development of global citizens who have the skills, perspectives, and motivation to work effectively for social justice. Each seminar will examine a particular case study while utilizing the work of Martin Luther King Jr. The seminar also provides the academic framework that explores the nexus between race, migration, and social justice. Through both individual and group work students will work to draw conclusions and life lessons from their international research and experiences. This seminar may be taken for 0 or 1 credit and is open to Martin Luther King Jr. Scholar Program participants only. For more information scholars should review the program requirements. Prerequisites: CSCR 12000. 0-1 credit. (F, Y)

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 6:30PM - 8:00PM W

 

 

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