Courses

Spring 2016

CSCR 10600-01 Introduction to African Diaspora Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell
ENROLLMENT: 30        

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introductory survey of the major topics and methodologies involved in studying the roots and routes of the African diaspora. Investigation of the physical and cultural movements between Africa and the Americas. Topics include the prominence of Africa in global history; the movement of African people (both voluntary and forced migrations); the enslavement of African peoples in the Americas; cultural aesthetics and identities; colonialism; and resistance. Employs an interdisciplinary approach drawing from disciplines in history, politics, cultural studies, social policy, and sociology. Prerequisites: None. (F-S, Y) 

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:10PM – 2:25PM TR

CSCR 10700-01 Introduction to Latino/A Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licon
ENROLLMENT: 30     

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This interdisciplinary course explores the varied experiences of Latinos/as in the United States, past and present. Drawing from the disciplines of history, anthropology, literature, women's studies, and ethnic studies, it examines the historical roots of Latino/a, Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, Central, and South American peoples. In particular, it will focus on notions of family, gender, class, race, political economy, language, and sexual identity in relation to public policy and Latino/as' struggles for place and power. Its approach is historical and comparative and it emphasizes the multiplicity of Latino/a experiences as well as the strategic deployment of the term Latino/a. Prerequisites: None. (F-S,Y)           

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:00PM – 1:50PM MWF

CSCR 10900-01 Introduction to Native American Studies
3 Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Taylor
ENROLLMENT: 30  

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers an interdisciplinary survey and introduction to the field of Native American Studies. Focuses on how past and present Native American experiences both in the United States and with its colonial precursors have shaped this pan-ethnic group’s identity, cultures, political power, and ways of life. Examines approaches to Native American Studies and the way Native Americans have navigated their relationship to others historically and today. This is a cross-listed course; students cannot receive credit for both CSCR 10900 and ANTH 10900.  (F-S, Y)    

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 10:00AM – 10:50AM MWF

CSCR 11000-01 Introduction to Asian American Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen
ENROLLMENT: 30    

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers a critical introduction to Asian American Studies. Focuses on Asian migrations to the U.S., especially in response to labor demands in the 18th -21st centuries. Examines the ways these migrations and subsequent generations of Asian Americans have shaped the economy, racial hierarchies/power, notions of citizenship and cultural belonging, and movements for freedom and autonomy. Discusses the structure and systems of race in the United States as they apply to Asians within a broader context.            

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 9:25AM – 10:40AM TR

CSCR 12300-01 Introduction to Culture, Race & Ethnicity Concepts
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Belisa Gonzalez
ENROLLMENT: 30         

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students to key concepts in culture, race, and ethnicity studies. Drawing from cultural studies, comparative ethnic studies, and gender and sexuality studies, it investigates how racial and ethnic identity politics shape institutional and social policies, cultural expressions and aesthetics, and resistance movements. Particular attention will be paid to the ways communities of color have negotiated oppression, generated knowledge, and secured dignity and self-determination.         

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 11:00AM - 11:50AM MWF

CSCR 20500-01 Contemporary Issues in Native American/Indigenous Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Taylor
ENROLLMENT: 20      

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines what culture is and it explores the roles that culture plays in the lives of individuals and social groups. It looks at what people do, how they explain what they do, and the things they produce as they go about their daily lives. It explores the ways culture affects relationships and behavior within social groups, and the ways it guides interactions between groups.        

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:00PM – 2:50PM MWF

CSCR 22100-01 Research in Social Justice
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell
ENROLLMENT: 25           

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The MLK Sophomore Seminar – Researching Social Justice Seminar – introduces students to research methods by highlighting historical and contemporary social justice research. The seminar is designed to prepare students to create their own social justice oriented research proposals connected to social justice service.  Most specifically, the Sophomore Experience addresses the fourth student-learning outcome. 
MLK Scholars Student Learning Outcomes:
● be able to utilize Dr. King’s teachings to explain and analyze the fundamental ideas associated with social justice issues;
● be able to conduct a comparative research project on a social justice issue from an international perspective;
● demonstrate competent research skills, writing skills, and presentation skills;
● be able to identify and explain the differences between community service and social justice service; and
● demonstrate an understanding of race in relationship to other forms of oppression.   

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 6:30PM – 8:00PM W only

CSCR 23700-01 Policing the Borderlands: Power, Policy, and Justice
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licon
ENROLLMENT: 20        

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines the history of the US-Mexico Borderlands, with a special focus on power, policy, and justice. Investigates how state policy from the colonial period to the present has shaped people’s sense of community and national identification, and how peoples of multiple cultures and shifting national affiliations have historically negotiated power, policy, and justice in this region. Considers how power and justice are manifested in state policy and contested through acts of resistance and violence. Topics explored include policies associated to citizenship, statehood, immigration, sovereignty, education, crime, and enforcement. Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing. (Y)    

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 3:00PM – 3:50PM MWF

CSCR 25000-01 Hip-Hop Cultures
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Sean Eversley Bradwell
ENROLLMENT: 20   

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines the historical, political, racial, economic, and social importance of hip-hop as a cultural movement. Particular attention is given to hip-hop's main tenets (writ'ing, b-boy'ing, dj'ing, and mc'ing); the political economy of racialized representations; and the legacy and agency of cultural expressions.    

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00PM - 5:15PM TR 

CSCR 26100-01 Watching Race in U.S. Media
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Taylor
ENROLLMENT: 20 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores how representations of racial and ethnic identities in U.S. film, television, and music influence the construction of political, racial, and gender identities nationally. Investigates how cultural representations of race, ethnicity, and gender are central to the development of U.S. mass culture and consumerism, nationalism, citizenship, and social movements. Particular attention is given to the role of black and Latino/a culture and music in developing strategies of resistance to oppression. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.           

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00PM - 5:15PM MW

CSCR 27000-01 Asian American Race Rebels
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen
ENROLLMENT: 20               

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an interdisciplinary course designed to analyze the historical and social significance of Asian American individuals and groups--in real life and in popular culture—whose transgressions have contributed to the formation of imagined communities and sometimes even progressive change.  Some of these race rebels have a popular following while others may be unsung heroes. The term is based on Robin D.G. Kelly’s definition of the “race rebel” and their non-traditional forms of protest and activism that put them at odds with establishment racial politics (usually defined as individualists or assimilationists) but resulted, whether intentionally or accidentally, in providing inspiration for fewer generations. Classes will largely consist of lecture, discussion, multimedia, and activities. Students will be asked to complete a group project due at the end of the semester.     

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 10:50AM - 12:05PM TR

CSCR 32200-01 Research in Global Justice
1 credit
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez
ENROLLMENT: 25         

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students in the Martin Luther King Jr. Scholars Program to advanced research methods and writing on social justice topics using an international and comparative perspective. Guides the development of comparative case study projects based on research and travel conducted through the MLK Scholars Program. Students are expected to present their research findings in conference settings. This seminar is open to Martin Luther King Jr. Scholar Program participants only. For more information scholars should review the program requirements. 

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 6:30PM - 8:00PM W only

CSCR 38000-01 Applied Research in Culture, Race & Ethnicity Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licon
ENROLLMENT: 12   

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is meant to give students a hands-on research experience in close collaboration with the CSCRE faculty member teaching this course. The projects students will work on are part of the active scholarly agenda of the faculty member in question. Students will engage in textual analysis of primary sources obtained from university and community archives. Students will also transcribe digitally recorded interviews conducted by the professor.  Finally, students will discuss research findings with one another and help determine how research and writing will proceed.          

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00PM – 6:40PM M only

 

 

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