Courses

Spring 2017

COURSE SUPPLEMENTS FOR CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF CULTURE, RACE, AND ETHNICITY

CSCR 10600-01, -02  Introduction To African Diaspora Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Marsha Horsley
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introductory survey of the major topics and methodologies involved in studying the roots and routes of the African diaspora. Investigation of the physical and cultural movements between Africa and the Americas. Topics include the prominence of Africa in global history; the movement of African people (both voluntary and forced migrations); the enslavement of African peoples in the Americas; cultural aesthetics and identities; colonialism; and resistance. Employs an interdisciplinary approach drawing from disciplines in history, politics, cultural studies, social policy, and sociology.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:35 – 3:50 pm AND 4:00 – 5:15 pm TR

CSCR 10900-01  Introduction to Native American Studies
3 Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Taylor
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers an interdisciplinary survey and introduction to the field of Native American Studies. Focuses on how past and present Native American experiences both in the United States and with its colonial precursors have shaped this pan-ethnic group’s identity, cultures, political power, and ways of life. Examines approaches to Native American Studies and the way Native Americans have navigated their relationship to others historically and today. This is a cross-listed course; students cannot receive credit for both CSCR 10900 and ANTH 10900. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 10:00 - 10:50 am MWF

CSCR 11000-01  Introduction to Asian American Studies
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers a critical introduction to Asian American Studies. Focuses on Asian migrations to the U.S., especially in response to labor demands in the 18th -21st centuries. Examines the ways these migrations and subsequent generations of Asian Americans have shaped the economy, racial hierarchies/power, notions of citizenship and cultural belonging, and movements for freedom and autonomy. Discusses the structure and systems of race in the United States as they apply to Asians within a broader context.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:35 – 3:50 pm TR

CSCR 12300-01  Introduction to Culture, Race & Ethnicity Concepts
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students to key concepts in culture, race, and ethnicity studies. Drawing from cultural studies, comparative ethnic studies, and gender and sexuality studies, it investigates how racial and ethnic identity politics shape institutional and social policies, cultural expressions and aesthetics, and resistance movements. Particular attention will be paid to the ways communities of color have negotiated oppression, generated knowledge, and secured dignity and self-determination.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 11:00 – 11:50 am MWF

CSCR 20600-01 Asian American Counterspaces
2 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores how independent storytellers in the media have challenged the misrepresentation of Asians and Asian Americans in the culture industry and society more broadly.  Incorporates a critical history of the culture industry as well as analysis of Asian American (mis)representation in popular culture, how that has affected Asian Americans in real life, why that matters.  Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 10:50 am – 12:05 pm TR

CSCR 20601-01 Pan Asian American Film Festival
1 credit
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Working with faculty, filmmakers, and community members, students will organize the Ithaca Pan Asian American Film Festival.  Explores how film festivals serve as a critical site of distribution and cultural exchange for minority filmmakers.  Hands-on skill development in such areas as curating films and live performances, public relations and marketing, development of sponsors, and engagement in community outreach and volunteer recruitment.  Students must be able to attend the Film Festival weekend to enroll in this course.  Prerequisite: CSCR 20600 or GCOM 10700; may be taken concurrently.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Practicum
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 3:00 – 3:50 pm W

CSCR 21100-01 American Gangster
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licón
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines the portrayal of race, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality in American gangster films. Prerequisites: One course in the humanities.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00PM - 5:15 pm MW

CSCR 23700-01 Policing the Borderlands: Power, Policy, and Justice
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gustavo Licón
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines the history of the US-Mexico Borderlands, with a special focus on power, policy, and justice. Investigates how state policy from the colonial period to the present has shaped people’s sense of community and national identification, and how peoples of multiple cultures and shifting national affiliations have historically negotiated power, policy, and
justice in this region. Considers how power and justice are manifested in state policy and contested through acts of resistance and violence. Topics explored include policies associated to citizenship, statehood, immigration, sovereignty, education, crime, and enforcement. Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:00-2:50 pm MWF

CSCR 25000-01 Hip-Hop Cultures
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Marsha Horsley
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Interrogate the development and growing perspective of Hip-Hop Feminism.  The term Hip-Hop Feminism was coined by Joan Morgan with the release of “When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: A Hip-Hop Feminist Breaks it Down” (1999).  Hip-Hop Feminism emerges as a site of empowerment for women belonging to the Hip-Hop generation.  Providing a space to bring together feminist consciousness and Hip-Hop sensibilities to challenge patriarchy and racism while allowing women to re-imagine a self-politic of love and empowerment through Hip-Hop culture and music.  We will read works by Black women writers and Hip-Hop female performers to explore their cultural and knowledge production as acts of resistance, liberation, and pleasure.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:00PM – 2:25 pm TR 

CSCR 26100-01 Watching Race in U.S. Media
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Taylor
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores how representations of racial and ethnic identities in U.S. film, television, and music influence the construction of political, racial, and gender identities nationally. Investigates how cultural representations of race, ethnicity, and gender are central to the development of U.S. mass culture and consumerism, nationalism, citizenship, and social movements. Particular attention is given to the role of black and Latino/a culture and music in developing strategies of resistance to oppression. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00PM - 5:15 pm MW

CSCR 29005-01 ST: Moving Towards a Black (Fem(me)) Queer Politic
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Marsha Horsley
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course moves towards Black femme queer politics to disrupt the inadequate images and ideals that are currently evoked when terms such as femme or feminine are applied.  Though a Black feminist radical approach, we will push beyond the controlling images of womanhood to explore what it means to be Black, fat, queer, loud, ratchet, and carefree for Black women who identify as femme.  For Black women, loving their femininity and queerness is an act of liberation, shaping in inclusive Black sexual politics for trans and cis women.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00 – 6:40 pm W

CSCR 31600-01 Practicum in Social Change II: Urban Mentorship Initiative
1.5 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez
COURSE DESCRIPTION: COURSE DESCRIPTION: Practicum in Social Change I: Urban Mentorship Initiative is an academic mentorship program that offers students the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary, coursework and field-based service-learning aimed at supporting urban youth’s pursuit of higher education.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 5:25 – 6:40 - 5:15 pm MW

CSCR 35012-01 ST: Through the Smoke Signals: Re-Imagining Modern Native American Media
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Taylor
COURSE DESCRIPTION: A comprehensive perspective on the multiple forms of contemporary Native American film, literature, and other forms of media. The course will highlight recent trends and productions of these multiple media formats, and show the complex and expanding field in recent development by Native artists and visionaries.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 11:00 – 11:50 am MWF

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