Courses: Current and Upcoming

Spring 2014

CSCR 10600-01 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN DIASPORA STUDIES
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sean Eversley Bradwell

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introductory survey of the major topics and methodologies involved in studying the roots and routes of the African diaspora. Investigation of the physical and cultural movements between Africa and the Americas. Topics include the prominence of Africa in global history; the movement of African people (both voluntary and forced migrations); the enslavement of African peoples in the Americas; cultural aesthetics and identities; colonialism; and resistance. Employs an interdisciplinary approach drawing from disciplines in history, politics, cultural studies, social policy, and sociology.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:25pm - 2:25 pm TR


CSCR 10700-01 INTRODUCTION TO LATINO/A STUDIES
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Morales

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This interdisciplinary course explores the varied experiences of Latinos/as in the United States, past and present. Drawing from the disciplines of history, anthropology, literature, women's studies, and ethnic studies, it examines the historical roots of Latino/a, Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American, Central, and South American peoples. In particular, it will focus on notions of family, gender, class, race, political economy, language, and sexual identity in relation to public policy and Latino/as' struggles for place and power. Its approach is historical and comparative and it emphasizes the multiplicity of Latino/a experiences as well as the strategic deployment of the term Latino/a.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 9:00am - 9:50am MWF


CSCR 11000-01 INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Offers a critical introduction to Asian American Studies. Focuses on Asian migrations to the U.S., especially in response to labor demands in the 18th -21st centuries. Examines the ways these migrations and subsequent generations of Asian Americans have shaped the economy, racial hierarchies/power, notions of citizenship and cultural belonging, and movements for freedom and autonomy. Discusses the structure and systems of race in the United States as they apply to Asians within a broader context.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 9:25am - 10:40am TR


CSCR 12300-01 INTRO TO CULTURE, RACE, & ETHNICITY CONCEPTS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Paula Ioanide

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students to key concepts in culture, race, and ethnicity studies. Drawing from cultural studies, comparative ethnic studies, and gender and sexuality studies, it investigates how racial and ethnic identity politics shape institutional and social policies, cultural expressions and aesthetics, and resistance movements. Particular attention will be paid to the ways communities of color have negotiated oppression, generated knowledge, and secured dignity and self-determination.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF


CSCR 25000-01 HIP HOP CULTURES
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Sean Eversley Bradwell

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines the historical, political, racial, economic, and social importance of hip-hop as a cultural movement. Particular attention is given to hip-hop's main tenets (writ'ing, b-boy'ing, dj'ing, and mc'ing); the political economy of racialized representations; and the legacy and agency of cultural expressions.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm TR


CSCR 26100-01 WATCHING RACE IN AMERICAN MEDIA
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Paula Ioanide

Explores how representations of racial and ethnic identities in U.S. film, television, and music influence the construction of political, racial, and gender identities nationally. Investigates how cultural representations of race, ethnicity, and gender are central to the development of U.S. mass culture and consumerism, nationalism, citizenship, and social movements. Particular attention is given to the role of black and Latino/a culture and music in developing strategies of resistance to oppression.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 1:10pm - 1:50pm MWF


CSCR 27000-01 ASIAN AMERICAN RACE REBELS
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Nguyen

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an interdisciplinary course designed to analyze the historical and social significance of Asian American individuals and groups--in real life and in popular culture—whose transgressions have contributed to the formation of imagined communities and sometimes even progressive change.  Some of these race rebels have a popular following while others may be unsung heroes. The term is based on Robin D.G. Kelly’s definition of the “race rebel” and their non-traditional forms of protest and activism that put them at odds with establishment racial politics (usually defined as individualists or assimilationists) but resulted, whether intentionally or accidentally, in providing inspiration for fewer generations. Classes will largely consist of lecture, discussion, multimedia, and activities. Students will be asked to complete a group project due at the end of the semester.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 10:50am - 12:05pm TR


CSCR 29003-01 SELECTED TOPICS - MAID IN THE US: CAREWORK & POLITICS
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Morales

COURSE DESCRIPTION: For over 75 years, the U.S. National Labor Relations Act (1935) has formally excluded the basic rights and protections for agricultural workers, domestic workers, and independent contractors such as taxi workers and day laborers. Yet, such workers have self-organized and mobilized to be recognized as legitimate workers. The National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA), for instance, which formed in 2007, was successful in passing the first ever State Bill of Rights for domestic workers in New York (2010). Although, this is a milestone step, there are still challenges to effectively implement such a bill. In this course, we will be exploring how gender, race, immigration and care politics continue to marginalize, exploit, and disenfranchise certain groups, particularly immigrant women of color. Moreover, we will investigate the notion of reproductive labor and explore how do local and global labor markets shift from domestic workers to migrant women.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 12:00pm - 12:50pm MWF


CSCR 30700-01 RACE AND COLONIALISM
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Asma Barlas

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course engages colonialism as a set of racial and material practices that shaped the identities of the colonizers and the colonized as much as it did the global political economy. Three themes in particular will guide our engagement: the racial overtones and undertones of the colonial encounter, especially as embodied in the ideas of discovery, barbarism, and progress; the psychological dynamics of the relationship between the colonizers and the colonized; and the politics of oppression and liberation.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 2:35pm - 3:50pm TR


CSCR 32200-01 RESEARCH IN GLOBAL JUSTICE
1 credit
INSTRUCTOR: Belisa Gonzalez

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students in the Martin Luther King Jr. Scholars Program to advanced research methods and writing on social justice topics using an international and comparative perspective. Guides the development of comparative case study projects based on research and travel conducted through the MLK Scholars Program. Students are expected to present their research findings in conference settings. This seminar is open to Martin Luther King Jr. Scholar Program participants only. For more information scholars should review the program requirements.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 6:30pm - 8:00pm W only


CSCR 35002-01 SELECTED TOPICS: BLACK RADICAL TRADITIONS
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Paula Ioanide

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines Black radical philosophies ranging from slavery to the present. Traces shifts and continuities in how Black philosophers have contended with barriers to freedom and emancipation, with a focus on political organizers, artists and literary figures like Harriet Jacobs, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Frantz Fanon, James Baldwin, Angela Y. Davis and Audre Lorde. Explores these writers’ engagement with abolition, existentialism, desegregation, decolonization, and the intersectionalities of race, gender and sexuality, while situating the Black radical tradition within the broader history of U.S. thought, culture and politics.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 4:00pm - 5:15pm MW only


CSCR 45100-01 Research in Community Change
3 credits 
INSTRUCTORS: Belisa Gonzalez and Sean Eversley Bradwell

Prerequisites: Senior standing or Permission of the Instructor

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Research in Community Change is an interdisciplinary seminar-style course that explores approaches to evaluate community change.  Through readings on Participatory Action Research, Social Change, Program Evaluation, and Public Sociology we will explore different models and measurements of change. Using an evaluation of the Ithaca Talking Circles on Race and Racism as a case study, we will explore questions such as: What is community? Where does change originate? How can change be evaluated? What is the role of dialogue-based programs in community change? What is the role of colleges, universities and research in community change? Ideal students will have previously begun to explore issues of social justice, anti-racisms and related oppressions.

Cross-listed with SOCI 45100; students cannot receive credit for both CSCR 45100 and SOCI 45100.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Class participation, Critical Reflections, Individual and Small Group Research, Final Project

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture
SCHEDULED MEETING TIMES: 5:25pm - 8:05pm M only

 

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