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Checkpoints Lab

Work, Musings, Writings and Projects from FLEFF's Checkpoints Lab 2011

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Posted by Nicholas Knouf at 2:43PM   |  2 comments

This week was all about mapping, and the ways in which maps create and reflect socio-political-aesthetic realities.

Readings:

Trevor Paglen, "Experimental Geography: From Cultural Production to the Production of Space - The Brooklyn Rail", 2009 (accessed January 23, 2011).

Christiane Paul, Digital Art (Thames & Hudson, 2003), 174–189, "Databases, data visualization and mapping".

Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever (University of Chicago Press, 1995), 1–5.

Lev Manovich, "Database as Symbolic Form", Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies 5, no. 2 (1999).

Projects:

An Atlas of Radical Cartography (2007)

Josh On, They Rule (2004).

Nicholas A. Knouf, Journal of Journal Performance Studies (2010).

Announcing the Journal of Journal Performance Studies from Editor, JJPS on Vimeo.

Future Farmers.

Martin Wattenberg, Smart Money’s Map of the Market.



2 Comments

In a course I took my Freshman Year at Ithaca College, Introduction to Culture and Communication, we listened to a "This American Life" episode and followed the maps that were discussed. Dennis Wood tries to map different parts of his neighborhood by focusing on one thing, such as Halloween pumpkins on porch steps. Although he tries to make detailed maps to show things that people would often overlook, he understands that things are constantly changing and it is impossible to define everything. It is to map the light shining through the trees, because the trees are changing. Some will grow bigger, some will get cut down, and some leaves might fall off. The world is unknowable; we cannot even start to communicate every truth, such as every pumpkin on every porch step. Dennis Wood’s maps, in their own way, are making an “identity” of specific things in his neighborhood. Although there is no real way, or definite way, to define an element, he does is best to communicate it.

I'll attach the link as I think it is extremely relevant and useful with this Checkpoints discussion.

Here it is:
http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/110/mapping

The link I will attach is relevant and useful with this Checkpoints discussion of mapping.

Check out this "This American Life" episode:
http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/110/mapping

Dennis Wood tries to map different parts of his neighborhood by focusing on one thing, such as Halloween pumpkins on porch steps. Although he tries to make detailed maps to show things that people would often overlook, he understands that things are constantly changing and it is impossible to define everything. It is to map the light shining through the trees, because the trees are changing. Some will grow bigger, some will get cut down, and some leaves might fall off. The world is unknowable; we cannot even start to communicate every truth, such as every pumpkin on every porch step. Dennis Wood’s maps, in their own way, are making an “identity” of specific things in his neighborhood. Although there is no real way, or definite way, to define an element, he does is best to communicate it.

Enjoy!



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