Courses: Current and Upcoming

Current Semester Courses

DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY

Courses for Spring 2014

Updated: October 14, 2013

The Art History Department welcomes students of all disciplines. Our courses provide students with the skills needed to analyze the visual arts on their own, and to build an understanding of the relationships between artistic traditions and the cultures that produce them.

ARTH 11100-01 EPISODES IN WESTERN ART LA HU 3b, g h [CA perspective; Theme: Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation]
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Keri Watson, Gannett G119, Ext. 4-1380, kwatson@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Mainly first and second year students seeking an introduction to art history. THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO SENIORS.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will introduce students to the study of art, by focusing on particular times and places that have played key roles in shaping our view of western art history. We will investigate art that was produced around these crucial points in western history, as well as what preceded and what followed these turning points. The course will also pursue recurrent themes in western art history, such as conceptions of the body, forms of visual narrative, the art of spirituality, images of death and mortality, and images of power and propaganda. In addition, we will explore the ways in which western cultural production has been defined through contact with cultures deemed to be "outside" of the western tradition. Basic methods and vocabulary of art historical investigation will be stressed.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion and lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams and written assignments; consideration given to attendance and class participation in grading.

ARTH 11300-all sections ELEMENTS OF ARCHITECTURE LA FA 3b
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: David Salomon, Muller 117, Ext. 4-7318, dsalomon@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: Section 01: 72; Discussion Sections 02, 03, 04: 24 per section PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Inquisitive people drawn from throughout the College. ARTH 11300 is also an essential preliminary course in architectural studies for those who wish to continue in that field. THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO SENIORS.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Elements of Architecture will acquaint students with the art of making buildings through a discussion of a variety of topics, among them materials, structure, mechanics, space, and light. Architectural theory will also be introduced, from the ideas of Vitruvius through some of the more provocative pronouncements of today. The course will also feature architectural vocabulary, whose mastery is necessary for the analysis and understanding of architectural forms. Also essential are an understanding of the tools and techniques used by architects – i.e., plans, sections, elevations, perspectives, models, etc., to make and study buildings. Finally, Elements of Architecture will consider the activity surrounding the creation of architecture, including the interaction of architects, clients, builders, and even the natural forces that act upon buildings. All students enroll in Section 01 (lecture) and EITHER Section 02, Section 03 or Section 04 (discussion).

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, studio, interactive website.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Periodic writing assignments; 2 examinations; drawings and model making assignments. Grading based on an assessment of all work, written and oral.

ARTH 13500-all sections INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURE LA HU 3b, g h 3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Paul Wilson, Gannett 116, Ext. 4-3281, pwilson@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Those with little or no background in art history. THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO SENIORS. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Susan Sontag has written, “A society becomes modern when one of its chief activities is producing and consuming images.” Today, producing and consuming images isn’t one of our chief activities; it is our chief activity. This is a course about how images shape identities and exert power. Through both historical and contemporary case studies, students will develop and explore questions about the ways in which images form a foundation of knowledge in the modern and contemporary world.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, image-based discussion, small-group work.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Grading based on class participation, exams, reading responses, a short paper, and a presentation.

ARTH 16000-all sections ART ACROSS CULTURES LA HU 3b, g h [CA perspective; Theme(s): Power and Justice, and World of Systems]
3 credits
INTRUCTOR: Jennifer Jolly, Gannett 111, Ext 4-1254, jjolly@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Mainly first and second year students who want an introduction to art history. THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO SENIORS.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers a cross-cultural comparison of artistic and visual production and introduces fundamental concepts, terms, and visual analysis skills used in art history. By juxtaposing a variety of artistic cultures across time and space, this course will address how and why various peoples create art and communicate visually. Organization by theme will highlight different visual conventions and approaches to a range of subjects as well as the cultural and historical reasons for those differences.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture with discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, paper, class participation. Grade based on all written work, plus attendance.

ARTH 19600-all sections UNDERSTANDING ART LA HU 3b [CA perspective; Theme: Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation]
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Stephen Clancy, Gannett 117, Ext. 4-1261, clancy@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Mainly first and second year students. THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO SENIORS.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will explore the variety of visual experiences offered by what we call "art" – some forms of which you will recognize (e.g., painting, sculpture, prints, architecture, and even ads), and other forms with which you might not be familiar (e.g., spatial environments, performance art, conceptual art, and even "bug art"). We will attempt to define this thing we call "art," and the different kinds of "value" we assign to it. Then we will analyze the nature and vocabulary of the "visual dialogue" between work and viewer, in an effort to make sense of how visual objects and experiences shape the way we interpret and understand the world and our place within it. We will also investigate a number of techniques through which artists create works of art, and how these techniques directly impact the way we experience these works and the worlds that they create. Above all, you will learn to develop interesting and persuasive "arguments" about art, which will help you to gain a greater personal understanding of how you experience things visually, enliven your next trip to a museum, and improve work you do in other courses.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Digital presentations with discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, written assignments, in-class projects; consideration given to attendance and class participation in grading.

ARTH 19601-01 READING BUILDINGS LA FA 3b [CA perspective; Theme(s): Power and Justice and Identities]
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Lauren O'Connell, Gannett 118, Ext. 4-1377, oconnell@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 28 PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Students may not receive credit for ARTH 19601 and ARTH 11400. THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO SENIORS.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introductory course for students interested in architecture as a functional necessity, a structural art, and a window on human culture. Explores how we build and what our buildings say about us -- as individuals and members of groups and societies. Through the metaphor of "reading," students learn to look at buildings and to decipher what they see, with focus on the architectural expression of identity and power. COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Digital presentation with discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, reading responses, analysis project; consideration given to attendance and participation in grading.

ARTH 20900-01 INTRODUCTION TO THE ROMAN WORLD LA HU 3b, g h
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frances Gallart-Marques, Rothschild 175, Ext. 4-1136, fgallart@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Students of all disciplines are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores the many facets of Roman life as revealed through material culture; the arts (painting, sculpture, architecture, mosaics, pottery, metalwork); and the archaeological remains that shed light on the way Romans conducted their everyday lives. This is a thematic, rather than chronological, course. Satisfies the "art, visual culture, or architecture before 1400" requirement in the major.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, and collaborative work.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance in class is expected. Exams and projects. Grade based on written work, class participation, and attendance.

ARTH 22100-01 INTRODUCTION TO THE MEDIEVAL WORLD LA HU 3b, g h 3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Stephen Clancy, Gannett 117, Ext. 4-1261, clancy@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: All interested students are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will explore different facets of medieval life as revealed by the visual and material culture of the Middle Ages. The course will be organized by theme rather than chronology. Topics will include modern fascinations with the "medieval"; medieval maps and world views; religious functions and contexts for medieval images; visual narratives in the Middle Ages; contact and exchange between Jews, Muslims, and Christians; the visual cultures of the aristocracy and middle class; and imagery of death and mortality. The course will investigate a variety of types of objects and images (including buildings, sculpture, manuscript illumination, metalwork, and mosaics), as well as archaeological remains of medieval life.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, lecture, and collaborative work.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams and projects. Grades based on required work, with consideration given to attendance and class participation.

ARTH 24300-all sections GENDER AND VISUAL CULTURE LA HU 3b, g h
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Germann, Gannett 113, Ext. 4-1527, jgermann@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Student with little or no experience in art history, but with a significant interest in questions about gender .
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines images of women and men in relation to the concepts of gender, race, class, and sexuality in a wide variety of media. We will discuss both the history of art and feminist theory while investigating historical and contemporary representations. A central goal of the course will be to contextualize representations of femininity and masculinity within particular historical and cultural formations, to analyze the beliefs and attitudes held by their creators and shared or resisted by those who viewed them. COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Regular class attendance and participation. Written assignments and exams. The grades for this course will be determined by class participation, assignments, and exams.

ARTH 25200-01 TWENTIETH-CENTURY EUROPEAN ART LA HU 3b, g h 3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Gary Wells, Gannett 109, Ext. 4-1247, wells@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Students of all disciplines with an interest in the art, history and culture of 20th century Europe. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course studies the development of painting and sculpture in Europe from the 1890's until the post-WWII period. Emphasis will be given to the social and historical context of European Art, as well as the contributions of individual artists, like Matisse, Picasso, Kandinsky, and Duchamp. Movements from Post-Impressionism through Surrealism will be examined.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and Discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Grading based on written work, exams, regular class attendance and participation.

ARTH 28300-all sections AMERICAN VISUAL CULTURE: 1690 - 1960 LA HU 3b, h 3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Brcak, Gannett 114, Ext. 4-3482, brcak@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Anyone interested in the United States and its culture.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: American Visual Culture will be organized in a thematic fashion around topics such as democracy, colonialism, progress, and materialism. Traditional, “art historical” media will be joined by vernacular building, costume, advertising, film, photography, and television in order to create a fuller “picture” of American life and culture over three centuries. Recently, an astute observer of American life and culture asked, “What can we say about Americans from the things and images they have made?” This is an excellent question to keep in mind as you proceed through American Visual Culture.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, class discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Will be based on an assessment of the student’s written work and on class participation.

ARTH 28700-01 LATINO ART IN THE UNITED STATES LA HU 3b, g h [DV diversity] 3 credits
INTRUCTOR: Jennifer Jolly, Gannett 111, Ext 4-1254, jjolly@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Students interested in the study of Art History, Latin America, the United States, and Latino Studies.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: “Latino Art” is a broad category encompassing art produced by U.S.-based artists who acknowledge cultural ties to a range of countries, regions, and ethnicities within Latin America. This course will offer a historical and thematic investigation of U.S. Latino artistic production (painting, muralism, graphic arts and posters, photography, sculpture, performance art, installation art and film) during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include defining what it means to be both “Latino” and “American”; the “Borderlands” as a historical, political and metaphorical subject for artists; art and activism; regional art worlds within the US; and the art market and its impact on cultural migration.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, written work, and presentations. Grading based on class participation and assessment of written work, exams, and presentations.

ARTH 29200-01 INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUM STUDIES LA HU
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Paul Wilson, Gannett 116, Ext. 4-3281, pwilson@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 18

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing or above.
STUDENTS: Students of all disciplines interested in museums, particularly those curious about careers in a museum or art gallery.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: At its heart, this course asks the question “What is a museum?” It will provide a broad introduction to the history of art museums and galleries, explore the role of these institutions in society, and address the issues and ethical dilemmas that they face in the contemporary world. We begin with a brief history of art museums, investigating how their changing architecture reflects their changing missions. Next we explore key debates surrounding history, memory, audience, censorship, public funding, cultural patrimony, and economic development. There will be lectures, field trips, discussions, and presentations. Students will also research and present different careers in museums and galleries. This is a discussion and presentation oriented course that demands active student involvement.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, reading/topic discussions, and field trips.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Grading based on journal, oral presentations, short written papers, and active participation in class discussion and activities.

ARTH 30200-01 ARCHITECTURAL STUDIO II LA FA
4 credits
INSTRUCTOR: David Salomon, Muller 117, Ext. 4-7318, dsalomon@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 9
PREREQUISITES: Must have taken Architectural Studio I.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course builds on skills introduced in ARTH 30100, moving from the scale of the individual architectural object to consideration of the building in its broader urban and natural environment. Basic techniques of drawing and 3-D modeling are further developed with exposure to more advanced representational challenges and digital tools. Tompkins County and its environs will serve as a locus for studio projects focused on the intelligent integration of built and natural form. Targeted exploration of such themes as ecologically sensitive siting, sustainable use of materials, and harmonization with natural forces for reduced energy consumption will occur through focused exercises and a culminating semester project.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Studio
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Grading is based on effort, craft and quality of design projects; students are expected to have necessary drafting and model making equipment.

ARTH 31800-01 MEMORABLE CITIES LA FA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Lauren O’Connell, Gannett 118, Ext. 4-1377, oconnell@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts; sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Students of all disciplines with an interest in architecture, urban design, and cultural history. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course focuses on the architecture and urban design of a selection of world cities that are notable both for the character of their monuments and spaces and for their status as political, religious or cultural capitals. East and West, past and present will be represented as we focus on the physical fabric and cultural history of such cities as Kyoto, Los Angeles, Moscow, New York, Paris, Tokyo and Rome.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Digital presentation with discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, reading responses, research project and presentation. Consideration given to attendance and participation in grading.

ARTH 35003-01 STUDIES IN ART FROM BAROQUE TO MODERN: PORTRAITURE LA HU 3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Germann, Gannett 113, Ext. 4-1527, jgermann@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the fine arts or humanities, including one art history course; sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Students of all disciplines with an interest in the history of art and questions of identity.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Portraits and self-portraits are representations of specific individuals, yet they are also a key means for self-fashioning, for engaging historical and contemporary ideas about beauty, for addressing issues of gender, race, and sexuality, and for memorializing the subject. They have also been major points of contention for artists, critics, and art historians, who have debated portraiture’s significance, merit, and even dangers. This includes eighteenth-century French critics decrying portraiture as ‘emasculating’ the public sphere, as well as the recent controversy about exhibitions and sexual identity in relation to the Hide/Seek show at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. In all cases, portraiture situates the individual – the artist and the sitter – in relation to broader social, cultural, and political formations. This course will examine historical and contemporary portraits from a variety of art historical and theoretical perspectives. Some of the artists we will consider include Anthony Van Dyck, Jean-Marc Nattier, Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, Franz Xavier Winterhalter, and Lady Clementina Haywarden, as well as more contemporary artists such as Alice Neel, Lorna Simpson, David Hockney, and Chuck Close.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Presentations with seminar-style discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Written assignments (including a research paper), student presentations, and class participation.

ARTH 35006-01 STUDIES IN ART FROM BAROQUE TO MODERN: MINIMALISM LA HU 3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Josh Franco, Gannett 107, Ext. 4-1852, jfranco@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing or above.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: “Minimal” today can refer to art, architecture, film, music, food preparation, fashion, furniture design, language, and more. But where did it come from? We will look to the origins of Minimalism in art produced in the 1960’s, mostly in New York City. We will see a tension between the critics and cultural producers who introduced and proliferated “Minimalism” as a radical aesthetic and the artists to whom it first referred. In the following decades, Minimalism was revised frequently in art and criticism through consequent ideologies: feminism, multiculturalism, postmodernism, and decolonial studies. It also expanded geographically and became significant to artists making around the globe. Outside of academia, it became increasingly part of the popular vernacular as a way to either disparage or appreciate demonstrations of its codified characteristics: refusal of multiple parts, lack of embellishments, and aversion to color. As a class, we will investigate both its art historical persistence as well as its popular availability.

ARTH 39200-01 MUSEUM PRACTICES AND METHODS NLA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Keri Watson, Gannett G119, Ext. 4-1380, kwatson@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in art history; junior standing or above.
STUDENTS: Students interested in museum, library or archival work, as well as conservation of works of art, and students who create works on paper are encouraged as are students who like to investigate objects and their construction.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces various elements in the management of museums and galleries, focusing on the practical application of policies and procedures necessary to establish and maintain intellectual and physical control of museums and their collections. This course combines lecture, discussion, demonstrations, and field trips with hands-on projects in the Handwerker Gallery. Topics vary per offering and will include aspects of administration, object handling, physical care, recording, and the study of museums and their collections. COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Practicum with lectures, discussions, demonstrations, field trips, and practical work in the Handwerker Gallery.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: field trips, writing assignments, and hands-on projects. Grading based on above requirements, and student attendance and participation.

ARTH 49056-01 SEMINAR: ARCHITECTURE AS BIOGRAPHY LA HU 3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Brcak, Gannett 114, Ext. 4-3482, brcak@ithaca.edu ENROLLMENT: 12

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities and/or fine arts.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciples are welcome.
COURSE DECRIPTION: Life stories: why do we believe they must be told using only words? (As Joshua Taylor once famously asserted, “To see is to think.”) Architecture as Biography will focus on buildings fashioned for and/or by people whose architecture was so individual and so personal that it rightly may be characterized as biographical. We will consider a number of individuals and their buildings in great detail, looking at architecture created by and/or for people such as Darwin Martin, Washington Irving, Frank Gehry, Thomas Jefferson, Sir Walter Scott, Frederic Church, Franklin Roosevelt, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Class discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Will be based on an assessment of the student’s written work, and participation in discussion and group projects.

ARTH 49200-01 TUTORIAL: MONSTERS LA HU FA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Germann, Gannett 113, Ext. 4-1527, jgermann@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 4
PREREQUISITES: Art History major with senior standing or permission of department chair; permission of instructor .
STUDENTS: Primarily intended for senior Art History majors. Open to non-majors by permission.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Who or what constitutes a ‘monster’? This tutorial explores pictorial and textual accounts of ‘the grotesque’ and ‘monstrosity’ to examine the ways that artists and writers have conceived of what it means to be human or the Other. We will address the way monsters and monstrosity have been used to define the ‘normal,’ but also to critique it in cultural and political terms. The tutorial will address past and present representations of monsters, including Medusa, witches, vampires and slayers, and zombies, in literary, pictorial, and filmic versions. The tutorial group will collectively engage in readings and discussions based on scholarly and literary sources and in relation to visual representations. Students will develop individual research topics within this general framework, resulting in a significant paper. The tutorial is designed as a small group experience, so students should be self-motivated and willing to fully participate in the group's activities. The Tutorial in Art History fulfills the Art History Senior Experience requirement for senior Art History majors. COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, seminar.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Based on participation and a significant research paper.

ARTH 49400-01 INTERNSHIP: ART HISTORY NLA
1 to 4 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Keri Watson, Gannett G119, Ext. 4-1380, kwatson@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in art history, sophomore standing or above, permission of the instructor. COURSE DESCRIPTION: The internship provides opportunity to gain practical experience working in a gallery or museum, under the joint supervision of a member of the museum staff and an Ithaca College faculty member. Internships are arranged individually at the student’s request, subject to the availability of an appropriate museum or gallery slot.

ARTH 49700-01 INDEPENDENT STUDY: ART HISTORY LA HU FA 1 to 4 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Staff
ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Offered only on demand and by special permission.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Program of special reading and research under the supervision of a specialist in art history.

ARTH 49800-01 SENIOR INTERNSHIP NLA
3 to 4 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Keri Watson, Gannett G119, Ext. 4-1380, kwatson@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Art History major with senior standing or permission of the department Chair and permission of the instructor.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An opportunity for senior Art History majors to gain practical experience in the fields of art and architectural history, under the joint supervision of a site supervisor and an Ithaca College faculty member. Internships are arranged individually by the student and are subject to the availability of an appropriate internship position.

School of Humanities and Sciences  ·  201 Muller Center  ·  Ithaca College  ·  Ithaca, NY 14850  ·  (607) 274-3102  ·  Full Directory Listing