Course Descriptions

History Courses: Spring 2013

Department of History Spring 2013

 

HIST 10100-01 Foundations of Western Civilization 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Matthew Klemm, Muller 405, Ext. 4-1306

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: This is a beginning level survey course. As such it is designed for first year students and sophomores. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 10100 and HIST 18100, World Civilization I. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide an overview of "western" (i.e., primarily European) history from Ancient Greece to the Reformation. Topics covered will include Greek democracy, the Roman Empire, the medieval history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Protestant Reformation, and the Age of Religious Wars.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Primarily lecture, some discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two examinations, several short essays, one longer essay, class attendance and discussion; grading based on class participation, examinations, and essays.

 

HIST 10200-01 Modern Western Civilization 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Karin Breuer, Muller 419, Ext. 4-1489

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: This is a beginning level survey course. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 10200 and HIST 18200, World Civilization II. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide an overview of European history from 1648 to the present. Topics covered will include the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, socio-political change in the nineteenth century, Marxism and the Russian Revolution, the causes and effects of World Wars I and II, and the Holocaust.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Primarily lecture, some discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three examinations, 3 mid-length (4 page) analytical essays, class attendance and discussion.

 

HIST 10200-02 Modern Western Civilization 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Luis Sierra, TBA

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: This is a beginning level survey course. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 10200 and HIST 18200, World Civilization II. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Continuation of HIST 10100, extending from the early modern period to the present.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Primarily lecture, some discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Based on class participation, examinations, and essays.

 

HIST 11100-01 United States History to 1865 1 H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Pearl Ponce, Muller 406, Ext. 4-3606

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITE: None

STUDENTS: Usually first-year students and sophomores of all majors. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Survey of historical development, 1492-1865. Stress will be placed on political and social developments through the end of the American Civil War.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and Discussion. COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 1) Mid-term; 2) final; 3) 2 short papers; and 4) weekly reading. Based on discussion, papers, and exams.

 

HIST 11200-01, 02 United States History Since 1865 1 H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Chad Wheaton, Location TBA

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITE: None

STUDENTS: Usually first year students and sophomores from all majors. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Survey of the important cultural, social, economic, and political developments in the U.S. from 1865 to the present. As a survey, this course will give you a sound knowledge of the most important moments of our recent past. Special emphasis will be placed upon: the emergence of the nation as an economic superpower, the growing engagement of the U.S. in world affairs, and the rich social history (race, class, and gender) of the nation in this period.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 1. Three books. 2. One paper, 2 essay exams, and regular quizzes.

 

HIST 18100-01 World Civilization I 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jason Freitag, Muller 423, Ext. 4-5798

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: Primarily freshmen and sophomores: seniors require permission of instructor. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 18100 and 10100, Foundations of Western Civilization. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is the first in a two-semester World Civilizations sequence, and in it we will cover the period from the beginnings of human society until 1500 CE. The course will proceed chronologically, but has the objective of exploring certain crucial themes in the development of human history. Issues of migration, urbanization, tradition, family and social structure, identity (caste, class, race, sex ethnicity), authority and resistance, globalization and cultural encounter will help to guide out thinking as we move through the early millennia of history. The course will introduce the world’s major religions – Hinduism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam – and discuss their growth and impact. Finally, the course will look critically at “historiography,” or the writing of history, as we try to understand how writers in the past have tried to understand their world historically.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussion of readings. Each class one student will be responsible for making a brief, thematic presentation of the day’s readings.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, response papers, class attendance and participation, midterm and final. Grading-based on performance on each of the above requirements.

 

HIST 18200-01 World Civilization II 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Ablard, Muller 403, Ext. 4-3558

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: Primarily freshmen and sophomores. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 18200 and HIST 10200, Modern Western Civilization. Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide students with an understanding of world history from 1492 through the present. Global interactions, whether peaceful or violent, have profoundly shaped the course of world history. The major focus of this course, then, is the examination of how different national, religious, ethnic and racial groups have shaped and influenced one another. The course will begin with an examination of the balance of economic and military power in the world before 1492. After examining European exploration and conquest and the variety of responses by Asians, Africans and Native Americans we will consider the growth of the nation-state, the development of trans-Atlantic slavery, and the subsequent rise of revolutionary ideologies, industrialization, and imperialism in the nineteenth century. We will conclude with an examination of the impacts of the First and Second World Wars on global history up to the First Gulf War.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, lecture, student presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: quizzes, midterm, short paper, final exam.

 

HIST 18500-01 ST: Historical Studies: China in and Beyond the Headlines HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Lu Liu, Muller 416, Ext. 4-3035

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISTES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Course of an experimental nature. This course is primarily designed to provide students a solid background in the prominent social, political and economic issues in contemporary China. It aims to provide the necessary information for undergraduates to understand the current debates in popular literature on the China’s rise as a great power and to learn how to ask the right questions.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, student presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: discussions, short papers, class presentations

 

HIST 18600-01 ST: Historical Studies: 1968: A U. S. Revolution HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Trotti, Muller 412, Ext. 4-1591

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISTES: None

STUDENTS: Any interested students

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This experimental course will take the U.S. in the year 1968 as its framework and explore a series of issues of its time: the rise of the political right, violence (assassinations, riots), the Vietnam War, Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, and more). We will use oral history interviews and a host of primary source documents (readings/movies from 1968) to build an understanding of what it was like to live through the most contentious, conflicted year in modern U.S. history. We will focus on “merely” a year, but learn about an entire era and a turning point in American history.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and Discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: a variety of small assignments and readings from a range of sources from 1968.

 

HIST 22200-01 Rise and Fall of the USSR 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Zenon Wasyliw, Muller 427, Ext. 4-1587

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences and sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is a comparative, analytical survey of Soviet history. We begin with pre-revolutionary conditions at the turn of the century, appraise the 1917 revolutions and then proceed through the varied stages, policies, leaders and both their internal and global impact through 1991 and beyond. An interdisciplinary approach with an emphasis on interpreting historical primary sources is the foundation of analysis and critical appraisal. Political, social, cultural, economic and other modes of evaluation are implemented as are varied historical interpretations. Soviet history is complex yet extremely fascinating. We will engage in an interesting journey and evaluation of the Soviet past and its influence on the present and future.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussions and presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Examinations, a comparative book critique, interpretations of primary sources and class participation. (GRADING: A-F).

 

HIST 22300-01 Rise and Fall of the British Empire HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jason Freitag, Muller 423, Ext. 4-5798

ENROLLMENT: 27
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing and above.

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: At its height, the British Empire encompassed one quarter of the earth, and was so geographically dispersed that the sun literally never set on a British possession. This course will examine how and why Great Britain (a country half the size of France) acquired such a vast empire. The class will look at the scope of the empire – settlements and colonies in North America, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa; dependencies and protectorates in Africa and the Middle East; and finally the jewel in the imperial crown, India – and how the populations in both Britain and the colonized regions responded when faced with this empire. The class will also examine the technologies of power that enabled Britain to administer such a large area, and the ways in which imperial power was implicated in the construction of knowledge that introduced many of these places to a European audience, and formed the original basis of modern scholarship on much of the world. Finally, the course will focus on the dissolution of the empire in the twentieth century and the post-colonial legacy that continues to shape these former imperial possessions, as well as the modern British state. Counts towards the global history requirement for history department majors.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Interactive lectures, discussion of assigned readings (historical texts and novels) and films, student presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, response papers, class attendance and participation, critical essay (which will form the basis of an end-of-semester presentation); grading based on performance on each of the above requirements.

 

HIST 23200-01 Medieval Civilization 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Matthew Klemm, Muller 405, Ext. 4-1306

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: All are welcomed; this is not designed for History majors, exclusively. Students in the Park School, majors in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Art History, for example, have found this course useful in their majors. It is not necessary to have had previous, college level, history courses to understand the material, and to do well in the course.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers a survey of political, religious, and cultural developments in the western world, c. 300-1400. The primary theme will be the formation of a distinct European culture from a blend of Classical, Christian, and Germanic elements. Thus we will explore each of these elements individually before looking at how they contributed to new medieval mentalities. We will also devote considerable attention to the interactions between Europe and the larger Mediterranean world.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and Discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: is based on participation, essays, and exams.

 

HIST 24000-01 The Jacksonian Era, 1815-1848 HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Pearl Ponce, Muller 406, Ext. 4-3606

ENROLLMENT: 27

PEREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course focuses on the political, economic, social, transportation, and communication revolutions that fundamentally altered the American Republic from the aftermath of the War of 1812 through the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848. Topics include democracy and the second-party system; internal improvements; immigration and demographics; the Second Great Awakening; modernization; and social change, among others.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, readings, and discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: weekly reading and discussion, 2 short papers, and midterm and final examinations. Grading is based on performance on each of the requirements.

 

HIST 27500-01 The History of United States Popular Culture 1 H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Trotti, Muller 412, Ext. 4-1591

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Any interested students at the sophomore level or above.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Popular Culture has become synonymous with America – it is one of our chief exports and a defining part of what America is in the 21st century. This course explores the history of American popular culture from the earliest mass media and genres – minstrelsy, dime novels, photography, movies, baseball, vaudeville, radio, TV – that were the most popular pastimes of their respective eras. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the role of pop culture in a number of important historical themes: differences in the experience of popular culture according to race, gender, class, and sexual orientation, changes in technology and the business of pop culture, and how different media expressed the stereotypes of their times.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Several books, essay exams, participation, a short research project, and smaller assignments.

 

HIST 29200-01 ST: Studies in Global History: Introduction to Chinese Culture 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Lu Liu, Muller 416, Ext. 4-3035

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to the history and culture of China incorporates history, literature, geography, religion, literature, and material culture to create an understanding of China from its origins to the present.

COURE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, student presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, papers, class presentations.

 

HIST 29204-01, 02 ST: Studies in Global History: From Sugar to Oil in the Americas: A History of Commodities 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Ablard, Muller 403, Ext. 4-3558

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: From Sugar to Oil examines the ways in which commodities have shaped the Western Hemisphere from the arrival of Columbus to the BP oil spill. Students will gain an understanding of the way in which commodities fit into the larger fabric of world history since the 15th century. Our focus will not just be on what was produced and traded throughout history, but also on how historians, economists, and other social scientists have interpreted the social, political, environmental, and economic significance of particular commodities. Thus, while the course might appear to be about inanimate objects, it is in fact a course that focuses our attention on how these objects have shaped the human experience.

 

HIST 30400-01 The Age of the American Revolution 1 HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Vivian Bruce Conger, Muller 408, Ext. 4-3572, vconger@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors of all majors

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will place the American Revolution within the context of colonial demographic, economic, social, political and cultural development during the latter half of the eighteenth century. In part it will focus on the tangible events of colonial resistance, forming a confederation, drafting and ratifying the Constitution, splitting into opposing political camps, and culminating in the War of 1812. It will also focus as well on the intangible impact of ideologies such as democracy, representation, liberty, republicanism, and nationalism. It will explore more specifically how women, Indians, blacks, the wealthy and poor affected and were affected by the American Revolution.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion of primary and secondary sources as well as visual materials, and some lectures; two take-home exams and a 15-page research paper.

 

HIST 35500-01 Totalitarianism in Germany, 1933-1989 HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Karin Breuer, Muller 418, Ext. 4-1489

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing or above.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This class will examine two dictatorships, those of Nazi Germany and the German Democratic Republic (the communist system in East Germany). We will examine the following subjects: origins and goals of the National Socialist and Communist parties, collaboration and resistance, foreign policy, treatment of "racial" and "class" enemies, the role of women in the state, propaganda, and the reasons for the collapses of the respective governments.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Primarily discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Active participation in class discussions, a primary-source analysis, two take-home examinations, and a research paper.

 

HIST 37000-01 Slavery and the Old South: From Settlement Through Reconstruction HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Pearl Ponce, Muller 406, Ext. 4-3606

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course on the Old South will examine the rise and fall of the cotton kingdom with a focus on how the planter elite used slavery to dominate and shape southern society. While the South's colonial antecedents will be considered, the focus of this course will be on the development of the South as a conscious minority during the antebellum era and the death of the Old South as a result of the American Civil War and Reconstruction. This course counts toward the U.S. requirement for department majors and minors.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance; discussion of the assigned readings; short research paper; midterm and final. Grade will be based on performance of each of these requirements.

 

HIST 48105-01 History Seminar European: The Conversion of Rome HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Matthew Klemm, Muller 405, Ext. 4-1306
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITES: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor.

STUDENTS: Junior and senior history and social studies majors and minors.
have preference; other majors welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The main focus of this seminar will be to explore religious change in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages. The conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity is certainly one of the most remarkable transformations in Western history. We will examine the cultural context for the success of Christianity, especially the ways that this new religion managed to appeal to all levels of society, from Roman intellectuals to Germanic "barbarians."
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Weekly discussion of readings.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, active participation in class discussions, presentation of research, and two drafts of a 20-page research paper.

 

HIST 48106-01 History Seminar European: Stalin and Stalinism HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Zenon Wasyliw, Muller 427, Ext. 4-1587

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor.

STUDENTS: Junior and senior history and social studies majors and minors have preference; others welcome.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Stalinist legacy lives on in the former communist states of Eurasia and East Central Europe. Historians hotly debate and assess the impact of Stalinism on the evolution of the USSR and neighboring former Easter Bloc states. This seminar evaluates Stalin’s rise to power and the implementation and impact of his politics that define Stalinism. We will engage the historical debate by closely reading and discussing interdisciplinary-based historical works and sources and through student research papers.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Qualitative discussion of assigned readings and individual research projects.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Seminar discussion participation and the completion of a research paper.

 

HIST 48206-01 History Seminar: Global: How the World Has Done History: Historiography in Cross-Cultural Perspective HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jason Freitag, Muller 423, Ext. 4-5798

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: True to its title, this class will explore the nature of historical work across a broad range of cultures and time periods, apart from the Hegelian, progressive historical grand narrative. Our objective will be to identify and understand the many ways that other cultures have, and in some cases still do, construct and understand their past. We will examine the role of bards in cultural history, lineage as a vision of the past, the epic as history and cyclical thinking as a representation of temporal consciousness. Texts include Herodotus’ The Histories, South Asian vamsavali texts, The Muqaddimah of Ibn Khaldun and Cheikh Anta Diop’s The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: discussion, student presentations, research paper

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, weekly discussion, response papers, major research paper.

 

HIST 48300-01 History Seminar: United States: The Age of Women's Liberation: Politics and Culture in Post WWII America HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Vivian Bruce Conger, Muller 408, Ext. 4-3572

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor.

STUDENTS: Junior and Senior history and social studies majors and minors have preference; others welcome

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course looks at the origins, development, politics, culture and enthusiasm of the women's liberation movement, one of the largest protest movements in US history. We will be studying the writings of activists as well as examining contemporary analyses of the women's liberation movement as we explore its goals, aims, methods, limitations and accomplishments. This movement was accused of being all white, middle class, homophobic, racist, anti-mother, anti-children, anti-housewife, in fact almost anti anything. We will examine if such charges have any bearing as we study the women's liberation movement in the context of class, ethnicity, gender, race and sexuality. Throughout the semester, we will also explore larger question and issues: What is feminism? What is the "women's movement?" Was there a monolithic "movement" or many movements? Were they successful and how do we judge that? What were the differences among feminists, activists, and conservatives? How are differences negotiated? And as Time magazine pondered in a cover story in summer of 1998, is feminism dead?

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Extensive readings in books, journal articles, and primary documents, class discussion, analysis of visual materials

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance, readings, active participation in discussion (each student will be responsible for leading the seminar discussion at least once during the semester), and a 20- to 25-page research paper.

 

HIST 49200-01 GLOBAL TUTORIAL: WAR, SOCIETY & CULTURE: THE PACIFIC, 1931-45 HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Lu Liu, Muller 416, Ext. 4-3035
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and senior standing (or advanced junior standing).
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will introduce students to some of the key works and major approaches to the study of war in general, and the Asia Pacific war in specific. Except for the first week(s) examining conventional wisdom on the war years, the organization of this course focuses on topical approaches. We will consider questions of imperialism and colonialism, race and ethnology, gender and sexuality, as well as wartime propaganda, art, and popular culture. While the course is an intensive introduction to the major problems and controversies surrounding this pivotal era of recent East Asian history, it has two specific two goals: First, the course provides the background in the secondary literature for those about to embark on research on this period. Second, the course will help refine students’ skills in writing a well-organized and clearly written major research paper.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: weekly, one-on-one discussions of readings; reports on the writing process and the progress of the research paper.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: weekly attendance; discussion of assigned books; and a 20-25 page research paper as well as shorter papers designed to aid in the development of the final paper; grading based on performance of each of these requirements.

 

HIST 49500-01 Internship: History NLA
1-6 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Vivian Bruce Conger, Muller 408, Ext. 4-3572
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Four history courses; junior standing or above; permission of instructor and chair. Available for variable credit; only 6 credits may be counted toward the history major.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An opportunity for practical experience in a variety of history-related activities in the United States, under the joint supervision of the sponsoring agency and a history department faculty member. Internships are arranged individually and must be approved by the chair of the history department.

 

HIST 49900-01 Independent Study: History LA
1-3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Vivian Bruce Conger, Muller 408, Ext. 4-3572
ENROLLMENT: 1

PREREQUISITES: Senior standing, or equivalent.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Special research on an individual project arranged by a student with a particular faculty member. The project may include reading books and/or writing papers under the guidance of the faculty member, with a performance expectation of senior-level work. Offered on demand only.

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