Course Descriptions

History Courses: Fall 2013

Department of History Fall 2013

 

HIST 10200-01, 02 Modern Western Civilization 1 G H HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Karin Breuer, Muller 418, Ext. 4-1489
ENROLLMENT: 32
PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: This is a beginning level survey course. As such it is open to all students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide an overview of European history from 1648 to the present. Topics covered will include the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, socio-political change in the nineteenth century, Marxism and the Russian Revolution, the causes and the courses of World Wars I and II, and the Holocaust.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Primarily lecture, some discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two examinations, weekly reaction papers, two book reviews, and class participation.

 

HIST 11100-01 United States History to 1865 1 H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Trotti, Muller 412, Ext. 4-1591

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISTES: None.

STUDENTS: First year students and upperclassmen of all majors and disciplines; not open to seniors.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to some of the most important issues and themes in United States history from the colonial era through the Civil War. Of particular importance in this class will be the contact and conflict between cultures, the founding of our national government, and a discussion of the causes and effects of two of our most important wars – the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. In the process, the course will provide students with a basic understanding of the historical method as well as practice with their critical thinking and writing skills.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three books plus shorter readings; grade is based upon a midterm, final, one essay, and a series of quizzes.

 

HIST 11200-01, 02 United States History Since 1865 1 H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Smith, Muller 320, Ext. 4-1290

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITE: None.

STUDENTS: Primarily first and second year students from all majors. Open to students of all majors. This class is not open to seniors.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: I assume that American history is not a fixed set of facts, figures, and events; it is a story, shaped by countless forces and varying according to perspective. People, places, motivation and circumstance are the content for rigorous historical thinking in this course. History was contested all along and continues to be contested. It is that complexity we will explore throughout the semester. To that end, this course broadly explores major themes and issues that led to the making of the modern United States. We will focus on social and intellectual currents, labor and business, farmer protest, immigration and ethnicity, race and gender, the development of reform and radical thought and activities, American involvement in war, civil liberties issues, Progressivism and the New Deal, and major changes in post-World War II America. Through few short lectures, readings (both primary and secondary), DVDS/videos, hands on work with primary sources, LOTS OF DISCUSSION, and creating your own digital narrative of history you will become acquainted with the central concerns of US history and you will begin to cultivate habits of critical understanding that allow you to draw significance from the past.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion of readings (primary and secondary sources), DVDs/videos and some interactive lectures.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings from a foundation text (Give Me Liberty! 3rd ed. by Eric Foner and supplemental other readings on-line and through handouts. Also regular attendance, regular writing assignments, and 2 exams (part take-home, part in-class; grading based on attendance, class participation and above requirements.

 

HIST 18100-01 World Civilization I 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jason Freitag, Muller 423, Ext. 4-5798

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISITE: None.

STUDENTS: Primarily freshmen and sophomores: seniors require permission of instructor. Not open to students who have completed HIST-10100; The Development of Western Civilization.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is the first in a two-semester World Civilizations sequence, and in it we will cover the period from the beginnings of human society until 1500 CE. The course will proceed chronologically, but has the objective of exploring certain crucial themes in the development of human history. Issues of migration, urbanization, tradition, family and social structure, identity (caste, class, race, sex ethnicity), authority and resistance, globalization and cultural encounter will help to guide out thinking as we move through the early millennia of history. The course will introduce the world’s major religions – Hinduism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam – and discuss their growth and impact. Finally, the course will look critically at “historiography,” or the writing of history, as we try to understand how writers in the past have tried to understand their world historically.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussion of readings. Each class one student will be responsible for making a brief, thematic presentation of the day’s readings.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, response papers, class attendance and participation, midterm and final. Based on performance on each of the above requirements.

 

HIST 18100-02, 03 World Civilization I 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Luis Sierra

ENROLLMENT: 32 per section

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Not open to seniors except by permission of instructor. Students may not receive credit for both HIST 18100 and HSIT 10100.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: A comparative survey of world civilizations from the beginnings of humanity to the age of exploration in the 16th century. Considers the nature of early hunting-gathering societies, the impact of agriculture, the introduction of metallurgy (bronze and iron), and the evolution of civilizations in Eurasia, Africa, and the New World.

 

HIST #19400-01 ST: The Islands: The History of the Caribbean H

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Ablard, Muller 403, Ext. 4-3558

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISTIES: None.

COURSE DECRIPTION: This course examines the complexity of Caribbean history, taking into consideration the ways in which Caribbean identity is a multi-layered phenomenon where race, language, cultural identity, national identity, and transnationality all operate simultaneously. While not the sole focus of the course, we are interested in how Caribbean identities were formed from this a rich set of cross-currents.

 

HIST 19401-01 ST: Critical Issues in China H

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Lu Liu, Muller 416, Ext. 4-3035

ENROLLMENT: 32

PREREQUISTIES: None.

COURSE DECRIPTION: China’s economic growth in the last 30 years is a well-known story. However, the question many people ask is: can China sustain its fast development in the future? The main objective of this course tries to address the question by identifying the dynamics and challenges of contemporary China. We will examine change and continuity from Mao’s era to the present, explore legacies of tradition and revolution, and highlight the human dimension of individuals involved in the process of modernization and globalization.

Themes & Perspectives Course (two themes: a World of systems; and the quest for a sustainable future).

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: freshmen seminar

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: class discussion, papers

 

HIST 20200-01 Jews in the Modern World LA HU 1 G H

3 CREDITS (CROSS-LISTED COURSE)

INSTRUCTOR: Rebecca Lesses, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3556

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.

STUDENTS: Open to all students interested in history.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: This course deals with the challenges that Jews have faced in the modern world and the creative responses that they have made to them for the past 500 years, since the Expulsion from Spain in 1492. We will discuss the larger political and social forces that have influenced Jewish life in the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas: European colonialism, mass migrations, the philosophical Enlightenment, Jewish political emancipation, religious and political anti-semitism, the Holocaust, nationalism, Zionism, the establishment of the state of Israel. In this course, we also seek a lens into the modern Jewish experience through examination of religious and cultural movements like Jewish mysticism, Hasidism, and modern Jewish philosophy, and analysis of Jewish material culture, Jewish literature, and artistic representations of Jewish life.

NOTE: This course is cross-listed with JWST 20200 Jews in the Modern World. Students cannot register for HIST 20200 if they are registered for JWST 20200-01.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: class discussions, lectures, student presentations, and films

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: attendance and participation, short analysis papers, class presentation, midterm and final exam, and short research paper. Grading: A-F.

 

HIST 22400-01 Modern South Asia HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jason Freitag, Muller 423, Ext. 4-5798

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors of all majors.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will consider the history of modern South Asia, “modern” being broadly defined as the period from about 1500 until the present day. We will begin with an overview of the early cultural and political history of India to provide a general background and context for the course. We will then proceed through major social, cultural and political developments on the subcontinent, including the rise of the Mughal Empire, the coming of the British, the Sepoy mutiny/rebellion, the rise of nationalism, the Indian Nationalist Congress and the Muslim League, Hindu/Muslim communal tensions, partition and the formation of India and Pakistan. We will conclude with an exploration of contemporary cultural and political issues, such as human rights, particularly the rights of women (including analyses of such issues as sati, dowry deaths, literacy and sex selection), dalits (historically known as “pariahs” or “outcastes,”) and religious minorities; the rapid emergence of the “middle class” in India and the recent dramatic economic changes on the subcontinent; Indo-Pak relations and the development of nuclear powers in South Asia.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Interactive lectures, discussion of assigned readings, student presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, response papers, class attendance and participation, critical essay (which will forms the basis of an end-of-semester presentation). Based on performance on each of the above requirements.

 

HIST 22700-01 Islamic Civilizations: Muhammad to the 19TH Century: Early Islam HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jason Freitag, Muller 423, Ext. 4-5798

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences and sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course deals with the worldwide development of Islamic societies, beginning in the Arabian Peninsula just before the time of Muhammad. The course then considers the rise and consolidation of Islam in Arabia, and follows the global development and impact of Islamic societies as they become established from Europe to Indian and Southeast Asia. The course examines Islam in its various religious, cultural and political forms, and the ways in which it has provided aspects of a stable identity for Muslims worldwide while adapting itself to the social and cultural needs of the areas to which is spread. The course will also look critically at “historiography,” or the writing of history, as we try to understand how Muslim writers construed the form and meaning of their faith and their place as Muslims within this world. The course ends as the European colonial powers encounter the Middle Eastern and Asian Islamic worlds and a series of transformations begin that result in the contours of Islam in the modern world. Counts toward “the global history” requirement for our majors.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussion of readings.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, response papers, class attendance and participation, midterm and final; grading is based on performance on each of the above requirements.

 

HIST-23100-01 The Ancient World: Greece and Rome 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Matthew Klemm, Muller 405, Ext. 4-1306

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to the study of the Greco-Roman civilization, including a general survey of political institutions, intellectual developments, and social and economic conditions.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

 

HIST 26905-01 Honors Intermediate Seminar: Witchcraft in a Cross-Cultural Perspective LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Vivian Bruce Conger, 408 Muller Center, Ext. 4-3572

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISTIES: None.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: This course will focus on the "Burning Times" in early modern Europe (Germany, France, Italy, and England in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries); seventeenth-century New England and the Salem witch trials; the depiction of the witch in fairy tales from the Grimms to Disney; the depiction of witches and their persecution in literature that purports to rely on historical sources (such as Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, and Cary Churchill’s “Vinegar Tom”); and the explanations that scholars espouse for witch persecutions. It will examine why the outbreaks occurred when they did, who was accused of witchcraft and why, how the outbreaks reflected social and cultural values, and how the crises were resolved. Issues of religion, class, social structure, and especially gender will form the backdrop against which these broader questions will be explored.

The variety of the readings, from religious tracts to historical and fictional representations to pop culture to scholarship, will expose students to historical sources as well as scholarly criticism and, more importantly, a variety of argumentation styles with regard to the representation of witches. Students will be encouraged to critique historical as well as fictional sources, investigate the truth-claims of these sources, and explore the basis for these claims (what are the underlying assumptions of historical accounts; which historical accounts are more credible, which less, and why; to what extent can fiction claim to represent any empirical "truth"; what purposes does each kind of narrative serve?).

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: In-depth analysis of (that is, reading and discussion of) major books and journal articles in the field—which will be supplemented by primary source readings and films.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: In addition to the readings assigned, you will have an intellectual journal, three three-page analyses of a reading assignment, a film analysis, and a research paper. Grading is based on attendance, class participation, and the above requirements.

 

HIST 27000-01 History of American Environmental Thought 1 H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Smith, Muller 320, Ext. 4-1290

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences and sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Sophomore standing and up. Priority given to history and environmental studies majors and minors.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course traces the evolution of American ideas about nature and the environment from the colonial period to the present. Although rooted in intellectual history, this course will also explore cultural and social history as they relate to environmental thought. Students will examine the changing definition of concepts such as wilderness, conservation, and nature itself. Over the course of the semester students should develop a solid understanding of the ways politics, economics, religion, gender, and race have shaped environmental thought in this country. Students can also expect to practice historical interpretation through short writing assignments and a local environmental history project undertaken in cooperation with The History Center of Tompkins County.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: A mix of interactive lecture, discussion, and media presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two books and other short readings, regular attendance, several short papers and film critiques, local environmental history project, final paper. A-F, Standard breakdown. Based on performance of each of the above requirements.

 

HIST 27300-01 Twentieth-Century Global Revolutions in the 20th and 21st Centuries 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Zenon Wasyliw, Muller 427, Ext. 4-1587

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Sophomore standing and up.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers a survey of twentieth and twenty-first century world history through the comparative thematic study of global revolutions. We shall evaluate the following, 1) the evolution of a world system of development and liberal democracy; 2) comparative communist revolutions; 3) anti-colonialist and non-aligned revolutions and revolutionary movements in the post Second World War era; 4) comparative cultural revolutions of 1968 and 1979; 5) The revolutions of 1989 and the end of the cold war; 6) globalization, current and future revolutionary movements.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Interactive lectures, discussion of assigned readings, collaborative presentations, implementation of revolutionary models.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Tentative reading list: De Fronzo, James, Revolutions and Revolutionary Movements; Huntington, Samuel, et al. The Clash of Civilizations? The Debate; Kapuscinski, Ryszard The Soccer War; Zhenhau, Zhai Red Flower of China; Sharp, Gene From Dictatorship to Democracy; Satrapi, Marjane Persepolis Kenny, Padraic 1989: Democratic Revolutions at the Cold War’s End. Essay examinations, book critiques, class participation.

 

HIST 29201-01 ST: Studies in Global History: Rise of Modern China 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Lu Liu, Muller 416, Ext. 4-3035

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in humanities or social science.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: General survey of Chinese history, covering a chronology from 1800 to mid-20th century. Major themes include: the political/social traditions of imperial China, the challenge of and response to imperialism, the multi-ethnic empire and its problems, the transformation from empire to nation-state, war and revolution, etc.

COURE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture/discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: exam, papers, discussion.

 

HIST 29303-01 Selected Topics: Studies in U.S. History: Women in America, 1607-1870 HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Vivian Bruce Conger, Muller 408, Ext. 4-3572

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities and/or social sciences.

STUDENTS: Sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to teach you to think critically, analytically, and contextually about the diverse experiences and social roles of women from settlement in the 17th century to the era of Reconstruction after the Civil War.  As we build on our chronological framework, we will explore Native American women; regional variations in the formation of colonial society; the "proper place" of white women; women and politics, reform movements, religion, and sexuality; African-American women and slavery; women as pioneers; women and work. Through a combination of reading assignments, in-class discussion, class presentations, and historical films or documentaries, the course will emphasize the diversity and change among the various social classes and races that comprise our history. Readings will be based on both secondary and primary sources. Because I believe strongly in letting women tell their own stories, you will have many opportunities to “hear women’s voices” through letters, diaries, journals, and autobiographies. Counts toward the U.S. history requirement for history department majors.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion of primary and secondary source readings, videos, and student presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: In addition to the readings assigned, you will have two two-page analyses of a reading assignment, a take-home mid-term and a 10-page research paper. Grading is based on attendance, class participation, and the above requirements.

 

HIST 30500-01 Jeffersonian and Jacksonian America: Expansion and Reform HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Vivian Bruce Conger, 408 Muller Center, Ext. 4-3572

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors of all majors.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This was an age of great ferment for the new nation, a moment in which Americans had great hopes for creating a more perfect society. This course charts the transformation of society from the election of 1800 which brought Thomas Jefferson to power through the redefinition of the polity as a democratic state with the presidency of Andrew Jackson. Yet even as suffrage was expanded to include white men without property, other groups, including women, Native Americans, and blacks, strove to carve a place for themselves in this changing world. Often identified as the crucial period when the American nation cohered around a national culture, this period witnessed profound rifts over the political legacy of the American Revolution, “Manifest Destiny” and westward expansion, the institutionalization of slavery, the rise of industrialization and a new market economy (and the concomitant rise of a new class system), and various reform movements such as the Second Great Awakening, temperance, moral reform land reform, utopianism, and abolition. The course is focused primarily on class discussion with particular attention to critical reading of both primary and secondary sources and student research and writing. Counts toward the U.S. history requirement for history department majors.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: In-depth analysis of (that is, reading and discussion of) major books and journal articles in the field—which will be supplemented by primary source readings, videos, and student presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: In addition to the readings assigned, you will have an intellectual journal, three three-page analyses of a reading assignment, and a 15-page research paper on the topic of your choice. Grading is based on attendance, class participation, and the above requirements.

 

HIST 31300-01 The Other Europe: Modern Eastern and Central Europe 1 G H HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Zenon Wasyliw, Muller 427, Ext. 4-1587

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences and sophomore standing.

STUDENTS: Any interested students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The peoples of Eastern and Central Europe experienced revolutionary transformations in their political systems, economy, society and the structures of everyday life and values. We shall begin with a general political and cultural overview of Eastern and Central Europe from the pre-World War I period through World War II. The course will concentrate on the recent history of post-World War II Eastern and Central Europe. An interdisciplinary assessment of dissident and reform movements, popular revolts and other events and trends (e.g. Titoism, Hungary 1956, Prague Spring 1968, the Solidarity movement, underground music, etc.) will be discussed and analyzed within the framework of intellectual, social and cultural challenges to the existing communist order and the competing political influences of the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia and the west. Finally, we shall use our acquired historical expertise to assess transformations, conflicts and concerns experienced throughout Eastern and Central Europe in the nineties and into the twenty first century.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings to be announced. Grading based on research paper, examinations, semester project, and discussion.

 

HIST 35200-01 Monks, Heretics, and Scholars: the Culture of the High Middle Ages LA HU

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Matthew Klemm, 405 Muller, Ext. 4-1306

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISTIES: Sophomore standing for History majors: Junior standing for other majors.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course focuses on the period often called the "High Middle Ages," in the 12th and 13th centuries. This was a period of great achievement, ambition, and optimism, witnessing the creation of universities, stable monarchies, gothic art and architecture, and new habits of thinking about the natural and supernatural worlds. We will take a close look at these developments, focusing most intensely on the areas of greatest innovation and change.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

 

HIST 38700-01 History of Disease and Health in Latin America HU LA SS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Ablard, Muller 403, Ext. 4-3558

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities and/or social sciences; sophomore standing.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In the last decade, there has been a tremendous growth in historical scholarship on topics relating to disease and health in Latin America. Influenced by the growing field of the social history of medicine, many of these works challenge assumptions about the motives, design and implementation of public health initiatives since the period of early independence. Scholars have demonstrated that popular and professional notions of health and illness were not static but changed over time in response to an array of social, political and economic forces. This course has four major goals that are inspired by this new and dynamic body of literature. First, students will develop an historical awareness of the political and social dimensions of disease and health in Latin America. Second, students will gain insight into how the disease and health reflect broader political and economic developments in Latin America. Third, we will examine how interactions between medical practitioners and their clients have shaped public health policy in Latin America, perceptions of what constitutes “ill-health,” and notions of race, class and gender. Finally, students will develop a global perspective not just on issues of health and disease, but also economic, racial, and social inequality (at the local, national and international levels).

 

HIST 48100-01 History Seminar: Gender, Nation, and Citizenship in Modern Europe HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Karin Breuer, Muller 418, Ext. 4-1489

ENROLLMENT: 10

TOPIC: Gender, Nation, and Citizenship in Modern Europe.

PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and senior standing or equivalent.

STUDENTS: Senior history and social studies majors and minors with instructor’s permission.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: From the word “fatherland” to the phrase “mother tongue,” it is clear that there is an association between gender, the state, and national sentiment. This seminar will examine the often overlooked connection between gender and nationality since the French Revolution of 1789. In this class we will examine questions such as “What difference does it make to our understandings of nationalism and citizenship when gender is taken into account?” “How do gender and other identities (e.g., class and race) intersect with constructions of national belonging?” We will read primary documents, scholarly articles, and historical monographs. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and senior standing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, active participation, and a 25-30 page research paper.

 

HIST 48201-01 History Seminar: Global: Peace and Justice in Latin America HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Ablard, Muller 403, Ext. 4-3558

PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor.

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISTIES: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor.

COURSE DECRIPTION: This course examines the important ways that individuals and organizations have effected social and political change in Latin America through peaceful means. By examining the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo (Argentina), Archbishop Oscar Romero (El Salvador), Bishop Helder Camara (Brazil), the Vicariate of Solidarity (Chile), as well as anarchist, feminist, and environmental groups, we seek to understand the power of non-violence in effecting deep social change.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar-discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 25 pp research paper, weekly readings and written responses.

 

HIST 48202-01 History Seminar: Global: Mao’s China HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Lu Liu, Muller 416, Ext. 4-3035

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Senior standing or equivalent; permission of instructor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines the 20th century Chinese history with particular attention to the dynamics in which communist ideology and practices shaped China's modern transformation. Main themes include: the rise of Mao/Maoist ideology and the communist revolution, the Post-WWII transition to socialism; the cultural revolution, and Mao’s legacies.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: discussion, papers.

 

HIST 48300-01 U.S. History Seminar, Topic: The Greatest and Gravest Generation, 1939-1955 HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Trotti, Muller 412, Ext. 1591

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITE: Three courses in the humanities or social sciences; instructor’s permission.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This will be an intensive exploration into the United States at high tide. During and just after World War II, the United States had more power and authority – domestically and internationally, economically and militarily and according to every sort of measure – than ever before or ever since. How did this “greatest” generation accommodate themselves to the tremendous range of fears in this age as well as the tremendous possibilities that the future seemed to be unfolding before them? In what ways are “grave” problems that we now face (internationally, politically, economically, environmentally, and others) due to the choices we made in this peculiar moment of power and authority? We will be exploring those questions and more in this focused seminar.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion of common readings plus independent research.

 

HIST 49500-01 History Internship NLA

1/6 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Trotti, Muller 412, Ext. 1591

ENROLLMENT: 1

PREREQUISITES: Four history courses; junior standing or above; permission of instructor and chair. Available for variable credit; only 6 credits may be counted toward the history major.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: An opportunity for practical experience in a variety of history-related activities in the United States, under the joint supervision of the sponsoring agency and a history department faculty member. Internships are arranged individually and must be approved by the chair of the history department.

 

HIST 49900-01 Independent Study: History LA

1/3 CREDIT

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Trotti, Muller 412, Ext. 1591

ENROLLMENT: 1

PREREQUISITES: Senior standing, or equivalent.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Special research on an individual project arranged by a student with a particular faculty member. The project may include reading books and/or writing papers under the guidance of the faculty member, with a performance expectation of senior-level work. Offered on demand only.

 

HIST 58300-01 U.S. History Seminar, Topic: The Greatest and Gravest Generation, 1939-1955 HU LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Trotti, Muller 412, Ext. 1591

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITE: MAT students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This will be an intensive exploration into the United States at high tide. During and just after World War II, the United States had more power and authority – domestically and internationally, economically and militarily and according to every sort of measure – than ever before or ever since. How did this “greatest” generation accommodate themselves to the tremendous range of fears in this age as well as the tremendous possibilities that the future seemed to be unfolding before them? In what ways are “grave” problems that we now face (internationally, politically, economically, environmentally, and others) due to the choices we made in this peculiar moment of power and authority? We will be exploring those questions and more in this focused seminar.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion of common readings plus independent research.

 

School of Humanities and Sciences  ·  201 Muller Center  ·  Ithaca College  ·  Ithaca, NY 14850  ·  (607) 274-3102  ·  Full Directory Listing