Courses: Current and Upcoming

Next Semester Courses

SPRING 2015

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10100-01 Introduction to Philosophy 1 HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Any.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce students to basic philosophical methods and problems. Topics to be covered include the existence/nonexistence of God, theory of knowledge, the mind/body problem, theories of moral obligation and social and political organization.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three exams, final exam, class presentation and class participation.

PHIL 10100-02 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 1 HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brendan Murday, Rothschild Place 143, Ext. 47029, bmurday@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to philosophy that focuses on perennial philosophical problems, such as: the possibility of knowledge, the relation of the mind to the body, criteria for survival over time, the compatibility of freedom and determinism, and the relation between freedom and moral responsibility, utilizing primarily contemporary primary-text readings.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture with emphasis on class discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three exams, smaller assignments, and class participation; A-F.

PHIL 10100-03,-04 Introduction to Philosophy 1 HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 43077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on perennial philosophical problems including: (1) Does God exist? (2) What is the extent and possibility of knowledge? (3) What is the relationship between the mind and the body? (4) What sorts of changes can I as an individual survive? (5) What ought we to do? We will read mostly contemporary philosophical works.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture with significant amounts of time devoted to discussion. The focus is on learning analytical philosophical skills.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation, reading/reading guides, quizzes, papers, exams.

PHIL 10100-05 Introduction to Philosophy 1 HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 4-5713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course introduces the students to the discipline by featuring a selection of classical readings and arguments pertaining to the problems of knowledge, morality, free will, individuality and authenticity.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three exams; quizzes; participation.

PHIL 10100-06 Introduction to Philosophy 1 HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Theodore Korzukhin, Rothschild Place 110, Ext. 45155, tkorzukhin@ithaca.edu  
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is a broad introduction to philosophy. We shall cover a sampling from some of the main areas of philosophy. Topics covered will include free will, personal identity, existence of God, knowledge & scepticism, a variety of moral theories, and moral relativism.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: TBA
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBA

PHIL 20300-01 Introduction to Logic 2B LA NS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brendan Murday, Rothschild Place 143, Ext. 47029, bmurday@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities, sciences, or mathematics.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Study translation between English sentences and logical notation, the logic of truth functions, and proofs in sentential and predicate logic, with an ultimate aim of assessing the validity of arguments.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture with homework problems.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Five exams and class participation; A-F.

PHIL 20300-02,-03 Introduction to Logic 2B LA NS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place  141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities, sciences, or mathematics.
STUDENTS: Any.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce the students to the fundamentals of formal reasoning.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Four exams.

PHIL 20400-01 Choosing Wisely 1 HU LA QL
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 43077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We face decisions of how best to pursue our goals all the time. Are some principles of choosing what to do more rational than others? Answering this question is the goal of rational choice theory; a joint effort of philosophers, mathematicians, economists, and other social scientists. The applications of rational choice theory are diverse, being used in economics, evolutionary biology, sociology, political science, and philosophy. We will look at some applications in all of these areas. The course is divided roughly into thirds. The first third of the class will deal with individuals making decisions on their own (think: choosing the smartest investment given your own particular goals). The second third will deal with making decisions partially based on what you think the decisions of other reasonable people will be (think: making the best move in a game based on both your own goals and knowledge of the other person's goals). The final third will deal with both how to aggregate the preferences of many individuals to come to a conclusion about the group's preference, and principles of how to divide goods among many people in a fair way (think: different ways of voting and dividing a cake equally at a party).
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, group work through problems, discussion of philosophical issues.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Homework, exams, and participation.

PHIL 21200-01 Introduction to Ethics 1 HM HU LA TIDE
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to the problems and theories of normative and critical ethics. Readings are selected from both classical and contemporary sources. We will consider a wide range of contemporary moral issues, such as abortion, war, capital punishment, the treatment of animals, and aid to the needy.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 3 exams, final exam, short written assignments (class participation too); traditional grading.

PHIL 21200-02 Introduction to Ethics 1 HM HU LA TIDE
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Theodore Korzukhin, Rothschild Place 110, Ext. 45155, tkorzukhin@ithaca.edu  
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is intended to introduce and explore some of the big questions about the content, scope, and nature of morality. The first half of the course will focus on various first-order ethical theories, which offer criteria of morally right action. These will include consequentialist and deontological approaches, and also broadly virtue-theoretic approaches. The second half of the course will examine some of the more abstract questions about the nature of morality which are the province of twentieth-century metaethics. What is the nature of moral properties? Where in the world might they be located? Are they objective, subjective, and/or relative to particular times and places? What is the connection between morality, moral judgments, and being motivated to act morally?
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: TBA
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBA

PHIL 22300-01 Introduction to the Philosophy of Art HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 4-5713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course examines some of the central questions in contemporary philosophy of art pertaining to topics such as the value of art, the nature of artistic expression, and the relationship between art and society.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Tests, quizzes, class participation.

PHIL 23000-01,02 Bioethics 1 HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu<mailto:tpatrone@ithaca.edu>
ENROLLMENT: 25 each section
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing or above.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course in biomedical ethics. The developments in biomedical science that occurred in the course of the XX century have opened the door to some important philosophical problems: When – if at all – is it morally appropriate to terminate a pregnancy? Are doctors morally justified in helping patients to end their lives? Is it morally permissible to change the genetic make-up of our children? Is cloning morally objectionable? To what extent should the state be allowed to legislate over issues such as these? The course in bioethics is meant to acquaint you with some key arguments, perspectives, ideas, and positions that philosophers have developed concerning these questions. While the course does not promise to give simple answers to these questions, it will aim at helping you to acquire the philosophical skills necessary to develop such answers. You will learn how to read and to understand philosophical texts dealing with issues in bioethics, how to parse and to assess philosophical arguments, and how to come up with both critical and constructive arguments of your own.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, group-work, debate.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams (midterm and the final), research paper (10 pages long), weekly contributions to Sakai discussion board; grading based on the preceding requirements; attendance and participation will be taken into consideration.

PHIL 26500-01 PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS IN LAW HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in philosophy.
STUDENTS: All who meet the prerequisite are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examination and evaluation of basic practices and principles of law, focusing on such topics as the nature of law and extent of legal liability; competing theories of constitutional interpretation; and the justification of punishment, including capital punishment. Examination of prominent legal cases and their underlying principles. Emphasis on philosophical analysis and moral evaluation.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, exams, in-class debates; traditional grading.

PHIL 27000-01 Individual and Community in American Thought IDE HM
3 credits                     
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 45713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course addresses the problem of finding a balance between the claims of individual autonomy,  uniqueness and self-determination vis-a-vis the social bonds, obligations, and responsibilities resulting from being a part of a human community.  The problem is addresses in the context of the debates in classical and contemporary American philosophy. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Tests, quizzes, class participation.

PHIL 28600-01 Philosophy and Literature HU LA W
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines are welcome COURSE DESCRIPTION: Discussion of issues emerging from the relation between philosophy and literary fiction: Why are we emotionally invested in what happens to fictional characters? Can the author ask the reader to imagine anything at all, or are there some things that a work of fiction simply cannot violate? What can a philosopher learn from the great works of fiction? The course will focus on philosophical texts, both classical and contemporary. The readings will not be long, but they will be dense and challenging. This is a writing intensive course, which means that we will be spending quite a bit of time on improving our writing skills by revising drafts and talking about writing as such.
COURSE FORMAT: Lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Short summary paper (5 pages), compare-and-contrast paper (5-7 pages long), research paper (10-12 pages long); weekly contributions to the Sakai Forum; grading will be based on the above requirements.

PHIL-30200-01  Eighteenth-Century Philosophy  HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place  141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15.
PREREQUISITES: One course in philosophy; two additional courses in the
humanities and/or social sciences.
OBJECTIVES: This course seeks to provide students with an understanding of the philosophical views of four of the most important philosophers of the European Enlightenment: John Locke, George Berkeley, David Hume, and Immanuel Kant.  Topics to be covered include the nature of language, matter, mind, knowledge, God, and morality.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
REQUIREMENTS: TBA.
GRADING: TBA.

PHIL 31100-01 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Two courses in philosophy, with at least one at level 2.
STUDENTS: All who meet the prerequisite are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Study and discussion of a broad range of issues in philosophy of religion, such as religious epistemology, the ontological argument, the cosmological argument, the teleological argument, religion and science, and the problem of evil. Primary source readings. Please note: PHIL-31100 is cross-listed with RLST-31100. Students may not earn credit for both PHIL-31100 and RLST-31100.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures and discussions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, papers, participation.
Books: Steven Cahn, Exploring the Philosophy of Religion;
William Rowe, Philosophy of Religion: An Introduction, 4th Ed. Traditional grading.

PHIL 33000-01 The Good Life HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15.
PREREQUISITES: One course in philosophy; two additional courses in humanities; sophomore standing or above.
STUDENTS: Those willing to work hard.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To examine one of the basic questions of the human condition: What is a good life? Readings from classical and contemporary thinkers.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Traditional.

RELIGION

RLST 10300-01 Hebrew Scriptures 3A H HU LA 
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Cynthia Hogan, Rothschild Place 110, Ext. 45155, chogan@ithaca.edu 
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None. 
STUDENTS: All students interested in learning more about the Bible. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Hebrew Bible (referred to by Christians as the Old Testament) serves as the basis for Judaism and Christianity, and is one of the foundational books of both Western and world culture. In this course, we will read the books of the Hebrew Bible critically as an anthology of texts written, edited, and compiled over time to explore the Bible’s historical, theological, and cultural development. This course acquaints the students with critical methods for the study of the Bible, surveys the biblical literature, and situates the Bible in the history, literature, and culture of the Ancient Near East. In exploring ancient Israelite religion, we will consider questions of history and archaeology as well as questions of meaning in terms of how biblical texts were understood by ancient readers, and how meaning has transformed over time. RLST-10300 is cross-listed with JWST-10300. A student may not earn credit for both RLST-10300 and JWST-10300. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Readings, discussions, lectures. This class is discussion-oriented with deep engagement with readings.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, papers, class discussion and participation; A-F

RLST 10500-01,-02 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS: INDIGENOUS AND EASTERN 1 G H HM HU LA 
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Staff, Rothschild Place 140, Ext. 41378
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section 
PREREQUISITES: None. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines methods in the study of religion and the meaning of ritual, myth, and symbols as applied to Native American and other indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and other Asian traditions. Compares ideas of divinity, methods of liberation, life after death, attitudes toward nature, ways of living in society, and world views. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: TBA 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBA

RLST 10600-01,-02 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS: WESTERN AND MODERN 1 G H HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Menning, Rothschild Place 139, Ext. 45802, nmenning@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces the academic study of religion through exploration of the origins, historical development, and thought and practice of the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Emphasizes how religious beliefs and practices evolve in response to historic events and changing cultural contexts, including interactions with other religious traditions.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Letter grade based on exams, written assignments, and class participation.

RLST 20200-01,-02 Religion and Society 1 G H HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brian Karafin, Rothschild Place 109, Ext. 4-1585, karafin@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing or above, or one course in religion.
STUDENTS: Any interested.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course probes the dynamic interactions of religion and secular society in the contemporary world. How have religious teachings and ideologies been mobilized to effect change in the world, and how has the changing historical context shaped the dynamics of religion? With examples ranging from progressive Evangelical Christianity to Socially Engaged Buddhism, Feminist Theology and the African-American prophetic Tradition, this course will be a conversation about the reciprocal interactions of religious ideas and practices with the worldly matters of social life on earth in our time.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, class discussions, films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings may include:
Susan Moon ed., Not Turning Away: The Practice of Engaged Buddhism;
Jim Wallis, The (Un)Common Good;
Rita Nakashima Brock and Rebecca Anne Parker, Proverbs of Ashes;
Cornel West, Black Prophetic Fire.
A-F; one third class participation, one third reading journals, one third final paper.

RLST-20300-01 Judaism 1 G HU LA 
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Cynthia Hogan, Rothschild Place 110, Ext. 45155, chogan@ithaca.edu 
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences. 
STUDENTS: Students interested in religion, philosophy, and the study of diverse cultures. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers an introduction to Judaism as a religious civilization, with a focus on theology, ethics, and ritual practices. Readings include selected texts from the biblical, rabbinic, medieval, and modern periods. Theological and ethical issues include God, good and evil, Covenant, death and afterlife, justice and social responsibility. The course examines how these understandings are observed and lived through ritual and life cycle practices as well as Jewish holidays. We will also explore how Jewish life is lived in a variety of Jewish communities, including Sephardic, Mizrahi (Jews from Arab countries), and Ashkenazic. Please note: This course is cross-listed with JWST-20300. Students may not receive credit for both JWST-20300 and RLST-20300. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Readings, discussions, lectures. This class is discussion-oriented with deep engagement with readings.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, papers, class discussion and participation, synagogue visits; A-F.

RLST 24000-01,-02 Selected Topics in Religion: Writing About Religion: Heaven and Hell HU LA 
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Rachel Wagner, Rothschild Place 111, Ext. 43249, rwagner@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18 per section
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course invites students to think about two thousand years of the history of heaven and hell while honing their research and writing skills in religious studies. Iterative writing assignments encourage students to view writing as a process of discovery and refinement, and introduce them to the style and approaches of writing about religion. Students of any major are welcome in the course, and will learn how to write about the fascinating study of human meaning-making in religious practice, poetry, art, and digital media.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion and workshop.

RLST 25200-01 Introduction to Mysticism HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brian Karafin, Rothschild Place 109, Ext. 41585, karafin@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Recommended for religious studies and philosophy/religion majors and minors. The course is open to all that are interested in a study of mysticism.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will be a philosophical and cultural inquiry into the topic of “Mysticism” understood as the human attempt to experience the ultimate nature of reality. We will probe a variety of representations of this dimension of human life in the context of its inter-relations with: a) the religious traditions of the West, b) the religious traditions of the East, c) contemporary longings for meaning and purpose, d) the search for alternative spiritualities , e) Feminist critiques of Mysticism
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Combination of lectures and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Possible readings:
Huston Smith, The Way Things Are;
John Hick, The Fifth Dimension;
Grace Jantzen, Power, Gender, and Christian Mysticism;
Rodger Kamenetz, The Jew in the Lotus.
Letter grade based on journals, exams, class participation.

RLST 31100-01 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Two courses in philosophy, with at least one at level 2.
STUDENTS: All who meet the prerequisite are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Study and discussion of a broad range of issues in philosophy of religion, such as religious epistemology, the ontological argument, the cosmological argument, the teleological argument, religion and science, and the problem of evil. Primary source readings. Please note: PHIL-31100 is cross-listed with RLST-31100. Students may not earn credit for both PHIL-31100 and RLST-31100.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures and discussions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, papers, participation.
Books: Steven Cahn, Exploring the Philosophy of Religion;
William Rowe, Philosophy of Religion: An Introduction, 4th Ed. Traditional grading.

RLST 37505-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN RELIGION: RELIGION AND FILM HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Rachel Wagner, Rothschild Place 111, Ext. 43249, rwagner@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: One course in religion; two additional courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course invites students to examine how film constructs and influences religious beliefs and spirituality in the modern world, as well as how religious beliefs and spirituality shape and inform film.  Students will exercise visual literacy by applying various methods of filmic analysis to select films; consider the language of film criticism and theory when applied to religious ideas; become familiar with the academic currents of the study of religion and film; and learn how to write about film, its conventions, and the role of religious ideas in film.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, some lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, film reviews, one longer in-depth film analysis.

RLST-37508-01 Selected Topics in Religion: Religion in the News HU LA 
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Menning, Rothschild Place 139, Ext. 45802, nmenning@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: One course in religion; two additional courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Open to all students who meet the prerequisites and have an interest in how religion intersects with public life. No previous blogging or website experience necessary.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: From the beheadings of journalists by ISIL to religious advocacy for immigration law reform to religious exemptions from federally-mandated health insurance coverage for contraception, religion is ubiquitous in our public discourse. In this course, we will develop the knowledge and skills we need to understand critically and participate responsibly in these matters of national and global citizenship. Our focus will be on coverage of religion in the news (nationally and internationally) as well as U.S. Supreme Court decisions on religious matters.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Small seminar emphasizing discussion, active learning, and website content development.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Letter grade based on class participation, collaborative work on a course blog, and oral and written analysis and interpretation of media coverage of religious topics.

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