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Monday Morning Memo

Here's a brief synopsis of what's going on this week in regards to Physics... and beyond.

Posted by Jill Ackerman at 1:18PM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday: April 8, 2014:

Sarah A. Shelby, Graduate Student in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Cornell University, gives a talk entitled:

Life at the Nanoscale: Super-Resolution Imaging of the Cell Membrane

In order to function within an organism, cells need to be able to sense their surroundings and react to stimuli, in other words, to receive, process, and respond to signals from the environment. Negative outcomes such as allergic reactions can be caused by the misfire of cellular signals that are transduced across the cell membrane. Many forms of cell signaling, including the allergic response, require the reorganization of protein and lipid molecules in the cell membrane at nanometer length scales. However, direct imaging of this reorganization in live cells has been historically restricted by diffraction, which inherently limits the resolution of conventional light microscopes. Fortunately, a new “super-resolution” fluorescence microscopy technique has been developed to beat the diffraction limit. Super-resolution microscopy exploits the photophysical properties of fluorescent molecules to locate the precise positions of each individual molecule with ~20 nanometer resolution. I will describe this technique and demonstrate how we are using it to observe the dynamic reorganization of fluorescently-labeled proteins on the cell membranes of live cells as they undergo allergic signaling.

Tuesday, April 8th, CNS 206B @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and refreshments provided for $1. Please bring your own cup. Remember to reuse, reduce, recycle.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 11:22AM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Matthew Sprague ‘05, Gives a Talk for the Physics Spring Seminar Series

Please join us for a talk with Matthew Sprague ‘05, NIST (Gaithersburg MD), entitled:

Quantum Chemistry and Thermochemistry of Atmospherically Important Reactions

Quantum chemistry uses the laws of quantum mechanics to determine fundamental properties of molecules and chemical reactions. We can determine molecular geometries; vibrational and electronic spectra; thermochemistry; and the dynamics, kinetics, and equilibria of chemical reactions. The results of these studies allow us to explain experimental findings and predict new chemical reactions or properties. In the first part of my talk, I will introduce some methods used in quantum chemistry.

Earth's atmosphere is considered a complex chemical reactor due to the presence of trace reactive species. Although these chemicals are present in concentrations of only parts per million, billion, or trillion, they govern the chemistry of ozone, smog, acid rain, and climate change. We must understand the fundamental properties of these species to aid atmospheric field measurements and improve environmental policy. In the second part of my talk, I apply the methods of quantum chemistry to examine reactions of atmospheric interest, including hydroperoxy self-reaction and ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons.

Tuesday, March 25th, CNS 206B @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and refreshments provided for $1. Please bring your own cup. Remember to reuse, reduce, recycle.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 9:11AM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday, February 25th 2014:

Jeff Porzio, '14, gives a talk for the Physics Spring Seminar Series

Please join us as Jeff Porzio, '14, gives a talk entitled: Characterization of Thick and Large Area YBCO Films Through Response Surface Methods

Tuesday, February 25th, 12:10 PM in CNS 206B

Pizza and refreshments provided for $1. Please bring your own cup. Remember to Reuse, Reduce, Recycle.

 


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 12:13PM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday February 11:

Spring Seminar Series

Join us as Amlan Biswas of Florida University gives a talk entitled:

Dielectrophoretic Behavior in Electronically Phase Separated Manganite Thin Films

Competing ferromagnetic metallic (FMM) and insulating phases in the manganite (La1-yPry)1-xCaxMnO3 (LPCMO) leads to a phase separated state in which micrometer scale FMM regions behave in a fluid-like manner over a narrow temperature range (Fig. 1). I will discuss our experimental results which show that an electric field can realign the fluid-like FMM phases embedded in an insulating matrix resulting in anisotropic in-plane resistance in microstructures of LPCMO thin films. Time and voltage dependent resistance measurements show that the dynamic percolation of the FMM regions leads to an insulator to metal transition due to electric field induced realignment of the FMM regions which is analogous to the dielectrophoresis of metallic particles suspended in fluid media. In-plane strain anisotropy plays an important role in determining the speed of dynamic percolation of the FMM regions by modifying the local electric fields in the phase separated state. I will also show that small magnetic fields (~100 Oe) can significantly modify the dielectrophoretic behavior. These observations suggest an unconventional form of magnetoelectric coupling.

*CNS 204* @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and refreshments provided for $1. Please bring your own cup. Remember to reuse, reduce, recycle.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 8:48PM   |  Add a comment

Physics Café – Thursday February 6 2014 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM – Emerson Suites - Free and open to the public.

Matthew Price of the Ithaca College Department of Physics & Astronomy talks about:

The Particle Zoo: The Newest Exhibit, the Higgs Boson.

Recent discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider have helped to find the elusive Higgs Boson have led to the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics being awarded to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs. Professor Matthew Price will be speaking about the Standard Model of Particle Physics and the newest addition to the particle zoo. We will explore the past, present and future of particle physics now that the most elusive particle has been confirmed.

Doctor Price is an Assistant Professor in the Ithaca College Department of Physics and has worked in Particle Physics, Astrophysics, Solid State Physics, and Physics Education. He has worked on understanding the structure of the proton as well as understanding how students think about physics.

 


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