Blog

Monday Morning Memo

Here's a brief synopsis of what's going on this week in regards to Physics... and beyond.

Posted by Jill Ackerman at 10:37AM   |  Add a comment

Tues., May 2:

Professors Nancy Jacobson, Ithaca College Department of Biology, and Michael Twomey, Ithaca College Department of English, give a talk for the Spring Seminar Series

Nancy Jacobson and Michael Twomey will talk about what has been going on in Congress and elsewhere that does, indeed, give us hope.  And they will present evidence for how we can move away from fossil fuels at the scale needed and without crippling the economy or hurting the poor.  It¹s called a carbon fee and dividend and is being promoted by Citizens¹ Climate Lobby a grassroots organization with 55,000 supporters in the United States and 30 other countries.

CNS 204 @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.

Thursday May 4:

Annual Physics & Astronomy Spring Banquet

6:00 PM - 9:00 PM Klingenstein Lounge, Campus Center


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 12:01PM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday, April 4, 2017:

Professor Matthew C. Sullivan gives a talk about the winners of 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics

The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to:

David J. Thouless, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

F. Duncan M. Haldane, Princeton University, NJ, USA

J. Michael Kosterlitz, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA

"for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter”

In this seminar, we will discuss “an unknown world where matter can assume strange states” and also future possible applications in both materials science and electronics.

Tues., April 4, 2017
CNS 206B @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 9:06AM   |  Add a comment

Please join us for a talk with Dr. Scott Franklin Professor of Physics,
Rochester Institute of Technology

Embedding physics concepts in mathematical formalism

To the physicist, the distinction between concept and mathematical formalism seems arbitrary. As one faculty colleague likes to say, "the concepts are the math and the math are the concepts.”  in this talk, I present two studies on how physicists embed conceptual meaning in complex mathematical formalism. The first study involves an analyses of faculty classroom discourse, which involves manipulating mathematical equations to illuminate physical principles. The second project studies how textbooks use the “=“ sign to imply causality, to define new physical quantities, and to assign numerical or variational values to symbols. These meanings are context-dependent, and can change within presented derivations. Both studies unpack the rich meaning physicists associate with math, meaning that is often hidden from students.

Scott Franklin received his Ph.D. from the Center for Nonlinear Dynamics at the University of Texas at Austin. He received a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in STEM Education, at Dickinson College with his mentor, Priscilla Laws. At RIT he maintains two research laboratories: one in soft condensed matter, with a focus on irregular granular materials, and a second in physics education research. His physics education research focuses on issues of identity, metacognition and representation. He is also Director of the Center for Advancing STEM Teaching, Learning & Evaluation and oversees a variety of programs aimed at fostering use of student-centered pedagogies and improving student performance and retention in STEM disciplines. 

Tues., Mar 21 2017
CNS 206B @ 12:10 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Pizza will be provided for $1
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 1:19PM   |  Add a comment

Please join us as Majors in the Department of Physics & Astronomy give talks on their summer research.

Majors in the Department of Physics & Astronomy give talks on their summer research.

Megan Holman:

Communicating Scientific Research to Non-Specialists

Amy Parker:

A Characterization and Toxicology Study of Microplastics

Daniel Santoro:

TBA

Tues., Mar 7, 2017
CNS 204 @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 2:31PM   |  Add a comment

You are invited to join the Ithaca College Department of Physics & Astronomy for a Public Viewing of the night sky at the Clinton B. Ford Observatory, Friday, March 3, 2017,  from 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

To attend a Public Night
Wait at the vehicle 'turn around' in front of the entrances of Smiddy Hall and CHS (F lot side).  A shuttle van will make regular runs to convey people up to the observatory and back down.  Please note that there is NO parking available up at the observatory and that the access road is NOT lighted.  For your own safety, please do not walk up.

Bad Weather Plan
The "go/no-go" decision for any public night will be made at 3:30 pm on the scheduled date.  Our web page and the recorded message at the observatory will be updated shortly thereafter to reflect the decision for that evening.  So if you check our website or call the observatory at 607-274-3012 after 4:00 pm you will get the final decision for that evening.


You can follow posts to this blog using the RSS 2.0 feed .

This blog is powered by the Ithaca College Web Profile Manager.

Archives

more...


School of Humanities and Sciences  ·  201 Muller Center  ·  Ithaca College  ·  Ithaca, NY 14850  ·  (607) 274-3102  ·  Full Directory Listing