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Monday Morning Memo

Here's a brief synopsis of what's going on this week in regards to Physics... and beyond.

Posted by Jill Ackerman at 10:46AM   |  Add a comment

Tueday April 28th:

Please join us for a talk with Dr. Sharon Stephenson, Gettysburg College, entitled:

Making beautiful physics with the help of MoNA-LISA

The MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) Collaboration successfully does new science in nuclear structure physics and relies on undergraduate student involvement. The research of MoNA addresses some of the major science questions in nuclear physics today: What is the limit of nuclear stability and what are the fundamental properties of extremely neutron-rich matter? Using high-energy projectile fragmentation reactions we produce and measure the decay of neutron-unbound nuclei with lifetimes of 10‒21s. Among the major accomplishments are the discoveries of 6 new isotopes (15Be, 16Be, 18B, 25O, 26O, and 28F). I will give an overview of our research program and emphasize the special role undergraduates have in our research agenda.

On Tuesday, April 28th at 12:10 in CNS 206B

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce

Thursday, April 30th

Annual Banquet
5:00 PM - 8:00 PM Klingenstein Lounge Campus Center

Alumni Speaker: Lia Stelljes, '08


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 2:55PM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday April 14, 2015:

Please join us as Majors in the Department of Physics and Astronomy give talks on their research:

Amy Parker: Contact Binary Stars

Matthew Bellardini: A Summer of SOFIA

Tuesday April 14th, 2015 CNS 204 @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.

 


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 11:58AM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday March 31, 2015:

Please join us as Majors in the department of Physics and Astronomy give talks on their research:

Kevin Coldren: 3D Laser Scanning: A Method for Digitally Preserving History

Cassandra Papaleo: Fluorescence Labeling and Imaging

Adam Scott: Brownian Motion: Monitoring Small Particle Motion by Image Analysis

Evan Van de Wall: A Tale of Two Summers

Tues., Mar. 31, CNS 204 @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 2:05PM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday March 17 - 12:10 - CNS 206B

Please join us for a talk with Timothy Dolch, Cornell University, entitled:

Pulsars as Gravitational Wave Detectors: A Radio and Optical View

The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) searches for gravitational waves. Gravitational waves (GWs) are waves in space-time emanating from, for example, distant supermassive black hole binary mergers. Einstein's general theory of relativity predicts the existence of GWs, but they have not been directly detected yet. Nearer, within our own Milky Way galaxy, reside many pulsars, which are rapidly rotating neutron stars that produce pulsed radio emission. Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) spin at nearly 1000 times/second. NANOGrav conducts long-term observations of 42 MSPs with the world’s two largest single-dish radio telescopes: Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico and the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. The line-of-sight to each pulsar acts as a detector arm for measuring small distance changes due to GWs. Limits on the maximum possible undetected GW amplitude have been produced based on the first five years of timing data. I first report on a 24-hr, nine-telescope observing campaign on pulsar J1713+0747 (Dolch et al. 2014) undertaken in order to establish the ultimate timing precision of MSPs, as well as to produce non-detection limits at higher GW frequencies than those usually studied by pulsar timing. I then report on recent and upcoming observations of optical bow-shock nebula around radio pulsars, such as the Guitar Nebula. These data can also lead to a better understanding of MSP timing precision. Improved timing precision helps our chances of detecting GWs.

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 7:58AM   |  Add a comment

Please join us as Majors in the department of Physics and Astronomy give talks on their research:

Eli Adler: Understanding the characterization of thin film growth

Connor Shea: The Characteristic Phase Transitions of Cobalt Doped Barium Iron Arsenide Single Crystals

Jonathan Smucker: Temperature of the Ithaca College MOT

Tues., Feb 24, CNS 204 @ 12:10 p.m.

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup.
Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce


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