Politics Courses

Fall 2014 Course Descriptions

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS

 

All Politics Department courses are open to all students who meet the prerequisites. For information on requirements for an Politics major or minor, please see Naeem Inayatullah, Politics Department, 325 Muller Faculty Center.

 

 

POLT 10100-01, 02 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1 h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course has three main purposes. In ascending order of importance, it seeks to familiarize students with the role of voters, interest groups, the media, and parties in the American political system. We will examine the dynamics of American political institutions and (some of) the origins of (some of) the current political cleavages in the U.S.; it will examine the gap between the ideals and practices of American politics.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion

 

 

POLT 10100-03, 04 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1 h
3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Carlos Figueroa, Muller 319, Ext. 4-7381

ENROLLMENT: 30 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This introductory course explores the development of the U.S. political system, how it works, and its impact upon individual citizens. The course is organized around four inter-related themes: political culture, power, institutions, and participation. We begin with the various foundations of U.S. politics, looking closely at the federal Constitution and the shifting meaning Americans have attached to fundamental rights and liberties. Then, we examine the various ways in which people have participated in politics in terms of party politics, national elections, and interest groups/social movements. Finally, we turn to the main political institutions at the national level: Congress, the presidency, and the courts -- and link these to the national policy-making process. Lectures/discussions/group debates explore each topic from an historical perspective, tracing the development of institutions and practices from the founding era to the present. Key documents read include: the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, federalist papers/anti-federalist essays, civil right acts, among others. The course readings consist of both primary and secondary source materials from political science, social& political thought and political/social/economic history. At the center of the course's approach to U.S. politics is the premise that past decisions by social, political and historical actors shape the choices open to later actors, including leaders, citizens and non-citizens alike.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: short video lectures; group discussions/debates; Skype presentation; films/documentaries

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: readings; weekly quizzes; 3 textual analytical summaries; mid-term exam, and two group projects/presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

POLT 12200-01, 02 POLITICS AND SOCIETY SS LA

3 credits

ICC ATTRIBUTE: Themes: Power and Justice & Quest for Sustainable Future

INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714
ENROLLMENT: 27
PREREQUISITES: none
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course in comparative and international politics that explores the impact of social forces and societal dynamics on the politics of diverse countries, as well as the influence of politics and the state on society. Students will be learning and analyzing past and current world events of political relevance in today’s world but that do not get well captured in mainstream media, such as what meaning does democracy have in different regions and for different actors, why/when democracies emerge and breakdown and with what effects on different societal groups, why is state power wielded in repressive manners across different political systems, what problems emerge when international actors attempt conflict resolution, governance-related reconstruction, and the push for human rights? What impact do citizens’ struggles and activism have on creating democratic and economic change within countries affected by poverty and/or conflict? Students will explore the history, political processes and events in a variety of countries including Chile, Venezuela, North and South Sudan, Poland, and other countries.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture and discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: thought-papers, group discussion, participation

 

 

POLT 12800-01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SS LA 1b, g
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103

ENROLLMENT: 29

PREREQUISITES: None
STUDENTS: Open to all.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We examine and discuss issues of security ranging from security of the state to security of individuals. Issues include the future of war, terrorism, the global economy, nationalism, ethnic and religious conflict, and the role of the media in how we think about the international. We also study how different perspectives lead us to see different worlds, looking specifically at realism, liberalism, global humanism, and theories of identity. This course counts as a Comparative and International Studies course for the purposes of the Politics major, the Concentration in International Studies, and the International Politics minor.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussions, films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance and participation in class discussions; readings for each class; three take-home exam essays.

 

POLT 12900-01, 02 Explor in Global & Comp Study

3 Credits

INSTRUCTOR: Begum Adalet

ENROLLMENT: 24

PREREQUISITIES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introduction to academic and policy debates over major global issues, such as globalization, social movements and civil society, development, international economic institutions and democratic governance. We will consider national and international policies, as well as responses from local actors and familiarize ourselves with important themes in comparative and international studies.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lectures, discussions, films, group work

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: attendance and active participation, readings, exams, response papers

POLT 14200-01, 02 IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES SS, LA 1a, 1b

ICC: SS, HU, Power & Justice, World of Systems

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 323, Ext. 4-3581

PREREQUISITES: None

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

COURSE DESCRIPTION: What is your idea of the ‘good life’ or a ‘perfect world’? How do you think we might achieve it, and why? Where do your ideas about the world and your own life come from? How do your individual beliefs relate to broader systems of thought we call ideologies? This course encourages self-reflection on these questions as we explore the ideological roots of political, social and economic life. Through multimedia course materials and your own observations, the course focuses key political ideas and ideological debates over their meaning and practice. We will examine a range of views on concepts such as liberty, equality, democracy, rationality, security, order, authority, community and nation. We will consider how these and other political ideas developed historically, why certain ideas endure, and why they remain important to understanding politics today. In doing so we will also pay close attention to how political ideas reflect, reinforce, and challenge relations of power, especially in terms of class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. The course encourages critical reflection on where our views about the world come from, and on aspects of political life that we take for granted. Encounters with political theories different from our own subjective views help bring to light our unconscious assumptions and also what is distinctive about our political views. Ideological perspectives the course explores include liberalism and conservatism (and their “neo” variants), socialism, anarchism, and fascism.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: discussion-based, infrequent lectures

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: active participation and demonstration of class preparation, one quiz, weekly written reflections, take-home midterm and final essays

 

POLT 14200-03, 04 Ideas and Ideologies SS LA 1a, 1b

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Evgenia Ilieva, Muller 311, ext. 4-7092

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

PREREQUISITE: none.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we examine the historical development and contemporary manifestations of a number of ideological perspectives including, but not limited to, liberalism, conservatism, socialism, feminism, anarchism, fascism, and religious fundamentalism. In addition to exploring the key concepts and normative assumptions of these various “isms”, the primary goal of the course is to encourage us to begin thinking about what ideology each of us currently believes in. We will ask why and how we have come to hold these beliefs, and we will seek to understand the way that our beliefs inform our practical conduct in the world.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Willingness to engage in close reading of some very interesting texts; participation; full presence in every existential sense of the word; response papers.

 

 

POLT 14500-01 POLITICS OF IDENTITY LA SS

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Asma Barlas, CHS 101 (CSCRE Office), ext 4-1056

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: Open to all

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course explores the relationship between racial identities and the political-economy of people’s lives by exploring a set of open-ended questions, such as, is race “real;” what are the social and psychological implications of thinking in terms of binaries like self/ other, black/white, similarity/ difference; do racial differences matter to the kinds of life chances people get; is color-blindness a form of anti-racism; and, are such questions relevant to your own sense of self?

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Class discussions and presentations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Class attendance/participation, journals, concept papers.

 

 

POLT 19500-01, 02 FOOD AND WATER SUSTAINABILITY
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: At some level, we may think we know what it means to eat and drink sustainably. This course will challenge conceptions by examining different, and often conflicting definitions of sustainability. Then, even if we do agree to eat and drink differently, we face challenges in changing individual behavior and social patterns in more sustainable directions. This course will look at the many actors and obstacles involved in defining and shaping our choices regarding food and water. Political systems privilege certain ideas and also specific interests. Economic structures and patterns limit our choices. Anthropological, cultural, and sociological backgrounds structure our options. Biological and psychological predispositions affect our ability to eat and drink sustainably. Students will consider the "simple" acts of eating and drinking from all of these perspectives. Students will be challenged to understand the potential for changing patterns of consumption, examining their own choices, their communities, and the socio-political system in which we are embedded.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture; expert presentations
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings and reading reactions, active participation in class discussions, 2-3 short papers (3-5 pages), 1 medium paper (5-7 pages), 1 final paper (7-10 pages)

 

 

POLT 23000-01 THE HOLOCAUST SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler

ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: One social science or humanities course
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introductory survey of major issues related to the Holocaust. We will examine the role of Anti-Semitism in Western Culture and the rise of the racial anti-Semitism that animated Nazi hatred of the Jews. Among the topics to be covered are: The rise of Hitler to power; the initial policies of persecution and dispossession of the Jews and Jewish responses to these policies; the evolution of Nazi policy from expulsion of the Jews to extermination; the role of Jewish community leadership in attempting to cope with a murderous onslaught by establishing Jews in vital industries; the cooperation of many German bureaucrats in the final solution; the relationship of the Holocaust to the Nazi’s overall racial views and their war of racial supremacy in eastern Europe; the ongoing controversy over whether more Jews could have been rescued by the nations opposing Hitler and his regime.

 

 

POLT 30900-01 The Ethics of Humanitarian Aid, Development, and Intervention

3CREDITS:

INSTRUCTOR: Begum Adalet

PREREQUISITE: Three courses in social sciences, or equivalent

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Kony 2012, a short film that sought to publicize Ugandan militia leader Joseph Kony and to raise funds for his capture and arrest, quickly became a viral sensation and the subject of moral controversy last year. The repercussions of 2011’s Arab uprisings have once again led to the possibility of military action across the Middle East. This course examines the roots of such debates, in particular the concepts of humanitarian aid, development, and intervention in light of their political and ethical implications. We will look at the historical development​ of these concepts, as well as contemporary occasions in which they are employed, such as debates over intervention in ​Rwanda, Darfur, Afghanistan and Iraq. Engaging visual media, such as websites and film, as well as the writings of political theorists and activists alike, our aim in this course is to answer a series of questions: what are the frameworks that are used to justify military action abroad? To what kinds of universal discourse do the proponents of humanitarian aid appeal? How do their critics respond and are they able to alternative solutions to conflict or poverty abroad? What are the advantages and ​pathologies associated with foreign aid and intervention? In engaging with these debates, we will also aim to reexamine our understanding of concepts central to political science, such as power, freedom, and democracy, and their projection abroad.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture, discussion, debates, films

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Attendance and active participation, readings, 3 response papers, final book review

 

 

POLT 31900-01 ST: U.S. POLITICS: THE POLITICS OF U.S. CITIZENSHIP LA SS
3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Carlos Figueroa, Muller 319, Ext. 4-7381

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: three courses in social sciences

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The aim of this seminar is to examine closely the following question: "What does it mean to be an American?" from a number of perspectives. We do this in order to critically and historically assess the various conceptions and understandings of U.S. citizenship within different contexts. We explore the way in which U.S. citizenship has been constructed and re-constructed through and by competing political visions and institutions, ideas, moral-religious beliefs, social values, racial, ethnic, and gender discourses, among others, over time. For example, we pay close attention to the articulation of citizenship at the various intersections of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and religion as categories of difference that often inform, if not structure, who can become a citizen and when certain political, social and civic rights ought to be recognized and protected. We also explore how key national institutions -- Congress, presidency, Supreme Court, and the Census Bureau -- shape debates over civic status, national identity, and political community. Finally, we consider the impact of transnationalism, multiculturalism and globalization on the meanings of U.S. citizenship, while illuminating the historical and civic dimensions of political membership more broadly. Readings will cover materials from political history, social and public policy, political/social theory, gender studies, to public law, sociology, and economics.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Introductory lectures, close reading of texts, individual/group led discussions; documentaries/films

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, lead 3 in-class discussions, take-home midterm, 2 short textual analytical summaries, a book review, final paper/oral presentation

 

 

 

POLT 32800-01 INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Naeem Inayatullah, Muller 325, Ext. 4-3028

ENROLLMENT: 24

COURSE DESCRIPTION: To learn about: the Cold War origins of Contemporary World Politics; origins of the conflict between first and third worlds; political debates over the meaning and construction of history and histories; politics of remembering and forgetting; colonialism, neo-colonialism, imperialism, neo-imperialism in contemporary politics; and the role of violence and non-violence in politics.  

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: willingness to accept alternative teaching methods. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Plenty of reading, writing, and discussion

 

 

POLT 33000-01 EUROPEAN POLITICS LA SS
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 24
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We start with the question of European identity: do we only mean the EU or something more general? Who is included or excluded, and how is this decided? This will lead to a discussion of “European” values. We will address tensions affecting the creation of a new geo-political entity called Europe out of many separate European countries. We briefly consider the structures and selected policies of the European Union.
The course will introduce further tools for understanding European politics by looking at some of the key European ideological/political groups that are less familiar in the U.S. (Social Democracy, Christian Democracy, the Greens, post-Communism and the far right). Similarly, the course will look at the ideas and practices behind welfare state policies: education, welfare, immigration, employment policy, and the environment.
Finally, students will examine the political systems of selected European countries, with their distinct sets of actors and policy priorities. The emphasis will be on institutional and policy variations in how each country responds to the same needs or issues, such as economics, civil rights, regional identity, and nationalism.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADES: Readings, active participation in class, 2-3 short analysis exercises (3-4 pages), 1 medium paper (5-7 pages), 1 final paper (8-12 pages).

 

POLT 34006-01 Selected Topics Comparative/International SS LA

TOPIC: Rebellion: Violence and Peace

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, 312 Muller, ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 22

PREREQUISITE: 3 courses in social sciences

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course looks into the choices and interplays between rebellion, violence, and peace in the context of uprisings against colonialism, foreign occupation, dictatorships, sham elections and democracies, racial & gender discrimination around the globe. Why do those ‘doing rebellion’ take violent strategies vs. a non-violent approach, and how much do they generate social change, or are suppressed? Is there room for nonviolence in a time of conflict and economic crises? We examine the history of nonviolent social activism through the twentieth century to the civil rights movement, the Vietnam era, and the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, Gaza; we also examine first hand narratives by survivors of racial and ethnic-based violence desire to espouse non-violent vs. violent activism, in the context of U.S. in the 1960s, of contentious movements and armed insurrection in El Salvador and Guatemala under dictatorships, and other contexts. We also examine how can one can interpret some women’s role in negotiating different types of violence and nonviolence; and what political, social and cultural processes play out in African countries (Ethiopia, Cameroon, South Africa) during different historical periods incite violence, and which facilitate negotiation through non-violent social practice? Can conflicts be transformed from something destructive, to the building of something desired? We will read excerpts from books such as: Unarmed Insurrections: People Power Movements in Non-democracies (by Kurt Schock, 2005); Through Survivors’ Eyes: From the Sixties to the Greensboro Massacre (Sally Bermanzone, 2003); War is a Force that Gives us Meaning (Chris Hedges 2003); Ghandi and Beyond: Nonviolence for a new Political Age (David Cortright, 2009); Remembering Revolution: Gender, Violence, and Subjectivity in India's Naxalbari Movement (Srila Roy, 2012); and others.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, with some context-setting lectures.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: short response papers; research-based paper; and class participation.

 

 

POLT 35001-01 Selected Topics in Political Theory: Violence & Intercultural Dialogue

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Evgenia Ilieva, 311 Muller, ext. 4-7092

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITE: none.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to the work of some of the most prominent philosophers of dialogue. Dialogue is a recurring theme in contemporary political and philosophical debates, and is central to an understanding of human communication as well as social, political, and cross-cultural interaction. Dialogue is frequently invoked as a solution to violent conflict and has been credited with, among other things, reversing the nuclear arms race and ending the Cold War. Far from being the exclusive purview of politicians and statesmen, dialogue is also an everyday phenomenon that operates at all levels of life. Taking seriously the claim that existence itself is dialogical by its very nature, in this course we examine the historical and political context for the emergence of dialogue as a distinct response to the “clash of civilizations”; we consider the normative aspirations that underlie the dialogic model of interaction; and we also seek to give voice to dialogue’s critics. Since all dialogues presuppose an encounter between “self” and “other”, a large portion of the course will also be devoted to exploring this relationship. A sampling of the questions we may consider include: Does dialogue always lead to mutual understanding? Do differences in power and culture between individuals involved in dialogic exchange enhance or inhibit the possibility of genuine communication? What does “genuine communication” look like? If dialogue is possible only under conditions of equality, how should we proceed in a world where such equality is absent? Finally, how might we conceive of dialogue in a manner that helps us overcome differences in power and culture? We will seeks answers to these questions by drawing on the work of the following thinkers: Plato, Bohm, Buber, Bakhtin, Dallmayr, Freire, Gadamer, Habermas, Heidegger, Levinas, Panikkar, Todorov, and Taylor.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Willingness to engage in close reading of some very interesting texts; participation; full presence in every existential sense of the word; 3 papers.

 

 

POLT 37000-01 ST: PUBLIC POLICY: LABOR POLICY LA SS

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

STUDENTS: Open to all interested student who meet the prerequisites.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will focus on the politics of wealth and poverty. After an extensive consideration of various policy approaches to the global economy, the course will focus on domestic problems. Among the topics to be covered are economic inequality, the attack on America’s modest welfare state, the working poor, and welfare reform.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Standard grading.

 

 

POLT 40102-01 SEMINAR: Violent Ethnic Conflict CP/IR SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITE: Junior or Senior standing; and 3 courses in social sciences or equivalent, one of which must be Politics.

STUDENTS: Open to interested students who meet prerequisites
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To what extent are wars motivated by cultural or national identity? Starting with this question we explore the sources of violent conflicts described as ethnic. We’ll look at the political, military, and cultural origins of the nation-state and the role of culturally-defined violence in constituting state, national, and group boundaries. Cases will include Yugoslavia/Bosnia, Rwanda, the United States and other cases.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance and active participation in Seminar; reaction papers for each reading; final research paper.

 

 

POLT 40103-01 Global Political Economy and the Making of the Third World LA SS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Naeem Inayatullah, x-3028

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITE: Junior/Senior standing and three courses in social science

COURSE DESCRIPTION: We explore the structural history of the simultaneous making of the Third World and the First World. That is, we examine the historical origins and dynamics of capitalism as it spread throughout the globe creating the First World in some parts of the globe while creating the Third World in other parts. The central text is L.S. Stavrianos’ Global Rift: The Third World Comes of Age. In addition to other supplementary materials, students will be asked to read two novels from Third World writers. The course is reading and writing intensive. 100 of your grade will be based on your written work.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: discussion

 

 

POLT 40200 – 01 SEMINAR: US IN THE MIDDLE EAST

3CREDITS:

INSTRUCTOR: BEGUM ADALET

PREREQUISITE: Junior/Senior standing and three courses in social sciences

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines the history of political, economic, and cultural encounters between the United States and the Middle East. We will focus on American policy in the region, as well as the role of non-state actors, such as technical experts, social scientists, and private firms whose projects were fundamental in defining the terms of ideological and political struggles between the two settings. The objective of the course is to evaluate scholarly accounts of US strategic interests in the region, taking into account regional challenges to these policies, as well as these policies’ cultural and ideological dimensions. Through primary and secondary sources comprised of written and visual media, we will try to understand the multidimensional nature of US-Middle East relations, and the ways in which those relations are deeply intertwined with questions of race, religion, and gender.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, student presentations, films

COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND GRADING: Attendance and active participation, readings, in-class midterm, final research paper

 

 

POLT 40500-01 INTERNSHIPS NLA

Variable Credit

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

STUDENTS: Interested students should see Don Beachler to register for an internship.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields. Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs. Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas. Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements. Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work. Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.


 

POLT 40550-01 INTERNSHIPS: INTERNATIONAL POLITICS NLA

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Junior or Senior standing; and 3 courses in social sciences or equivalent, of which must be Politics.

STUDENTS: Interested students should see Don Beachler to register for an internship.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields. Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs. Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas. Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements. Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work. Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.


 

 

 

 

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