Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses Fall 2005

Course Schedule

Fall 2005

Politics 310-10100 U. S. Politics
LA/SS,H,1B Credits: 3.00

  • 01 TR 08:00-09:15AM (FRND-303) Thomas Shevory
  • 02 TR 09:25-10:40AM (FRND-303) Thomas Shevory
  • 03 MWF 10:00-10:50AM (SMID-111) Juan Arroyo
  • 04 MWF 11:00-11:50AM (SMID-111) Juan Arroyo
  • 05 MWF 12:00-12:50PM (FRND-303) Alexander Moon
  • 06 MWF 01:00-01:50PM (FRND-303) Alexander Moon

310-10110 FYS: US Politics-Democrcy or Decptn?
LA/H,1B Credits: 4.00

  • 01 MWF 02:00-02:50PM (SMID-111) Donald Beachler
    F 03:00-03:50PM (SMID-111) Donald Beachler
    (students earning credit for this course (310-10110) may not earn credit for 310-10100/U.S. Polititcs.)

310-10200 Media & Poltc
LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 TR 10:50-12:05PM (TEXT-101) Martin L Brownstein
    M 01:00-01:50PM (SMID-111) Martin L Brownstein
  • 02 TR 10:50-12:05PM (TEXT-101) Martin L Brownstein
    W 01:00-01:50PM (SMID-111) Martin L Brownstein
  • 03 TR 10:50-12:05PM (TEXT-101) Martin L Brownstein
    F 01:00-01:50PM (SMID-111) Martin L Brownstein
  • 04 TR 10:50-12:05PM (TEXT-101) Martin L Brownstein
    M 03:00-03:50PM (SMID-111) Martin L Brownstein
  • 05 TR 10:50-12:05PM (TEXT-101) Martin L Brownstein
    W 03:00-03:50PM (SMID-111) Martin L Brownstein
  • 06 TR 10:50-12:05PM (TEXT-101) Martin L Brownstein
    M 05:25-06:15PM (FRND-303) Martin L Brownstein

310-12800 Intro International Relations
LA/SS,G,1B Credits: 3.00

  • 01 MWF 10:00-10:50AM (Williams-317) Chip Gagnon
  • 02 MWF 11:00-11:50AM (FRND-303) Chip Gagnon

310-12900 Introduction to Global Studies
LA/SS,G,1B Credits: 3.00

  • 01 TR 10:50-12:05PM (FRND-303) Peyi Soyinka-Airewele
  • 02 TR 01:10-02:25PM (FRND-304) Peyi Soyinka-Airewele

310-14100 Power:Race,Sex, and Class
LA/SS,G,1B Credits: 3.00

  • 01 TR 09:25-10:40AM (WILL-323) Zillah Eisenstein (Prefers Williams 323/needs smart room)

310-14200 Ideas and Ideologies
LA/SS,1B,1A Credits: 3.00

  • 01 TR 08:00-09:15AM (CNS-117) Charles Venator Santiago
  • 02 TR 02:35-03:50PM (DILL-1) Charles Venator Santiago

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310-20221 Honors Intermediate Seminar: Afghanistan
LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 MWF 09:00-09:50AM (FRND-303) Naeem Inayatullah

310-23000 The Holocaust
LA/SS,H,G,1A Credits: 3.00

  • 01 MW 06:50-08:05PM (FRND-303) Donald Beachler

310-29900 Field Study
NLA Credits: 1.00-7.00

  • 01 TBA TBA Donald Beachler

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310-30100 Legislative Behavior
LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 TR 02:35-03:50PM (FRND-303) Martin L Brownstein

310-30300 Constitutional Law
LA/SS,H,1B Credits: 3.00

  • 01 TR 01:10-02:25PM (FRND-303) Beth Harris
  • 02 TR 04:00-05:15PM (FRND-303) Beth Harris

310-30600 U.S. Foreign Policy (In Washington)
LA/SS Credits: 3.00 80

  • TBA TBA Thomas Bohn
    Registration for students accepted into Washington Program only.

310-32100 Contemporary British Politics (In London)
LA/SS Credits: 3.00 99 TBA TBA William Sheasgreen

310-33000 European Politics
LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 MWF 02:00-02:50PM (FRND-303) Juan Arroyo

310-33100 Latin American Politics
LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 TR 01:10-02:25PM (DILL-6) Charles Venator Santiago

310-34001 Seltp:Compartv/Internl Studies
TOPIC: African Politics Through Film

LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 T 04:00-06:30PM (CHS-202) Peyi Soyinka-Airewele

310-35000 Seltop:Political Theory
TOPIC: "CONSERVATIVE POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY"

LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 MWF 03:00-03:50PM (FRND-303) Alex Moon

310-37000 Selected Topics in Publ Policy
" Politics of Wealth and Poverty"

LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 MW 04:00-05:15PM (FRND-303) Donald Beachler

310-37204 Selected Topics in Politics (In Washington)
LA Credits: 1.00 80 TBA TBA Thomas Bohn (B-1) Students must be accepted into Washington Program.

310-37205 Selected Topics in Politics (In Washington)
LA Credits: 1.00 80 TBA TBA Beth Harris (B-2) Students must be accepted into the Washington Program.

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310-40100 Seminar: Compara/Interna Study
LA/SS Credits: 3.00

  • 01 M 04:00-06:30PM (CHPL-PHIL) Chip Gagnon
    Topic: NATIONALISM
  • 02 M 04:00-06:30PM (FRND-204) Juan Arroyo
    Topic: EUROPEAN PARTIES & IDEOLOGIES
  • 03 W 06:50-09:20PM (FRND-201) Beth Harris
    Topic: LAW, NATION & OCCUPATION

310-40400 Tutorial
LA/SS Credits: 1.00-4.00

  • 01 W 03:00-05:30PM (FRND-104) Zillah Eisenstein
    Topic: Feminisms 2005
  • 02 T 06:50-09:20PM (FRND-204) Alex Moon
    TOPIC: TOLERATION

310-40500 Internship
NLA Cred

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Fall 2005

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS

310-10100-01, 02     U.S. POLITICS     SS LA 1b h
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:  Tom Shevory, Muller 315, Ext. 4-1347
ENROLLMENT:  25 per section
PREREQUISITES:  None
OBJECTIVES:  Course involves critical approaches to U.S. politics.  A historical overview is provided, including attention to arguments regarding the meaning of the constitution and contemporary criticism of it.  An analysis and critique of the U.S. political economy is offered with specific reference to challenges and opportunities resulting from “globalization.”  Institutional aspects of U.S. politics are considered:  Congress, the Presidency, the courts, and the electoral system.  Civil rights and liberties are discussed in relation to issues of race and gender.  Considerable attention is given to the politics of the environment.
FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lecture/discussion.
REQUIREMENTS:  Three essay exams and a 12-page term paper.  Books include:  Matthew’s The Radical Politics of Thomas Jefferson; Reich’s The Work of Nations; Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale.
GRADING:  Standard.

 

310-10100-03, 04      U.S. POLITICS       SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Staff

ENROLLMENT: 25 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES:  Institutions, processes, and cultural roots of U.S. politics.  Complex interrelationships among a highly specific set of political-economic institutions which have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society; Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process.

STUDENTS:  Open to all students.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Discussion/lecture.

 

310-10100-05, 06       U.S. POLITICS      SS LA 1b h

Theory and Practice of Punishment

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Staff

ENROLLMENT:  25 per section

PREREQUISITES:  None

OBJECTIVES:  Institutions, processes, and cultural roots of U.S. politics.  Complex interrelationships among a highly specific set of political-economic institutions which have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society; Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lecture/discussion

 

310-10200-01 through 06     MEDIA AND POLITICS      SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544

ENROLLMENT:  6 sections @15 students each=90

PREREQUISITE:  None

OBJECTIVES:  1. To understand the symbiotic, mutually reinforcing nature of the relationship of governmental institutions and institutions of mass media.  2. To explore the myth of the adversary relationship between the press and the public order.  3. To see how issues of public policy are presented to mass audiences in terms of symbolic valence.  4. To comprehend the ways in which elections are influenced by media.  5. To explain the salient differences in method of news presentation by alternative media sources; to see how differing methods produce different outlooks. 6. To learn how governmental regulation of electronic media is qualitatively different from the forms of regulation imposed on print media; to understand the results of that difference.  7. To identify alternative forms of governmental regulation of public media in other nations.  8. To assess the relevance of this course material for the future of American democracy, for future prospects for citizen participation in public life, and for personal development; to ask "So What?"  9. To understand that political disputation and argument are integral to political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse, to know that everybody is biased, and properly so.  10. To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding--and great fun!

STUDENTS:  A wide variety of students form all disciplines at IthacaCollege are encouraged to take this course.  Students from Communications are especially welcomed, as are students from Business and all Humanities and Sciences departments.  Seniors, juniors, sophomores and first-year students are all invited to apply for this course.  NOTE: This course does not meet any specific Politics Department distributional requirements.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Two lectures, and one discussion class per week, and student involvement is actively sought after. This course will make extensive use of films and other video materials.

REQUIREMENTS:  Course requirements include approximately five books, the daily reading of The New York Times, attention to at least one weekly periodical magazine of political opinion, and at least one daily television news program.  Four take-home papers are required, and these may be rewritten so that students may be afforded the chance to learn from their errors.  Most fundamentally, students are expected to bring interest and enthusiasm into this course.

GRADING:  Traditional A, B, C, D, F grading will be used.

 

310-12800-01, 02   INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS   SS LA 1b, g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103

ENROLLMENT:  28 per section

PREREQUISITES:  None

OBJECTIVES:  We examine and discuss issues of security ranging from security of the state to security of individuals. Issues include the future of war, terrorism, the global economy, nationalism, ethnic and religious conflict, and the role of the media in how we think about the international.  We also study how different perspectives lead us to see different worlds, looking specifically at realism, liberalism, global humanism, and theories of identity.

STUDENTS:  Open to all

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lectures, discussions, films

REQUIREMENTS:  Attendance and participation in class discussions; readings for each class; three take-home exam essays.

GRADING:  Standard, based on above requirements.

 

310-12900-01, 02    INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES    SS LA 1b, g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, Ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT:  28 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: A compelling strength of global studies lies in its ability to challenge rigidly formulated political science traditions and to awaken our appreciation of the uneven impact of global processes in different regions of the world.  With that in mind, this course has the following objectives: 1) To expose participants to critical global challenges such as the protection of human rights in a competitive marketplace and the resolution of conflicts emanating from identity politics, weapons proliferation, the use of natural resources, the globalization of capitalist production and struggles for global justice.  2) To provide fundamental conceptual frames through which students can address the on-going debates on global history, imperialism and the moral use of power.  3) To undertake a comparative study of selected countries including Singapore, South Africa, and the United States as a means of deepening our awareness of the histories, racial, economic, and social structures that affect peoples and societies.  4) To foster dialogue that will contribute to the personal growth of all participants.

STUDENTS: Open to all

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lectures/discussions, films

REQUIREMENTS:  Attendance, active participation, end-of-section tests/exams, project and essay.

GRADING:  Based on above requirements.

 

310-14100-01     POWER:  RACE, SEX AND CLASS     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext. 4-3554

ENROLLMENT:45

OBJECTIVES:We will deal with the distribution of power in the U.S. according to economic class, sex, and race hierarchies.  We discuss what power is, where it comes from, where it is located.  This involves the analysis of power in terms of issues of capitalism, globalism, patriarchy, and racism, as well as the specific issues they raise for policy making, persons, the family, and corporate power.  The analysis will hopefully help us understand the relations of power defining black working class women, white male workers, white middle class women, etc.  The premise of the course is that in order to understand capitalist society one must understand the racialized aspects of sexuality as a form of power, as well as the sexualized aspects of race.  Some specific topics discussed are: the changing aspects of the nation-state; Reagan/Clinton political discourses; the Gulf War; the Chilean 1973 Coup; the changing realities of the middle/working class; the global racialized sexual division of labor; the O.J. Simpson trial, and so on.

STUDENTS:Majors and non-majors alike.

REQUIREMENTS:Students will read a variety of books, write two 7-page analytical papers.

 

310-14200-01, 02       IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES           SS LA 1a 1b

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Charles R. Venator Santiago, Muller 325, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

OBJECTIVES:  Exploration of the philosophical and ideological roots of political life and political inquiry.  The course will address notions such as social responsibility, civil disobedience, conscientious objection, the French Revolution, Marxism, Fascism, Nazism, cultural politics, Western Liberalism, conservatism, international law and justice, human rights, patriotism, nationalism, homeland security, and identity and violence.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Two lectures a week, TR 8 – 9:15 am and 2:35 – 3:50 pm

GRADING: Students are expected to write five short papers, to complete a journal,  and to actively participate in class.

 

310-23000-01   THE HOLOCAUST         SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  28

PREREQUISITES:  One social science or humanities course.

OBJECTIVES:  This course is an introductory survey of major issues related to the Holocaust.  We will examine the role of Anti-Semitism in Western Culture and the rise of the racial anti-Semitism that animated Nazi hatred of the Jews.  Among the topics to be covered are:  The rise of Hitler to power; the initial policies of persecution and dispossession of the Jews and Jewish responses to these policies; the evolution of Nazi policy from expulsion of the Jews to extermination;  the role of Jewish community leadership in attempting to cope with a murderous onslaught by establishing Jews in vital industries; the cooperation of many German bureaucrats in the final solution; the relationship of the Holocaust to the Nazi’s overall racial views and their war of racial supremacy in eastern Europe; the ongoing controversy over whether more Jews could have been rescued by the nations opposing Hitler and his regime.

 

310-29900-01   FIELD STUDY

(SEE 310-40500 INTERNSHIPS FOR FURTHER INFORMATION)

1 TO 6 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  5

PREREQUISITES:  310-10100, one other course in the social sciences, and permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES:  Opportunity for students to explore and experience facets of political life through work experience and/or field research.  Academic credit contingent upon completion of study design with departmental faculty member.  (Course may not be used to satisfy 100-level distribution requirements.)

 

310-30100-01     LEGISLATIVE BEHAVIOR          SS LA  

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544

ENROLLMENT:  28

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  1. To understand those political structures that are common in legislative decisional bodies.  2. To comprehend those institutional structures which are unique to the United States Congress.  3. To learn about the processes and social interactions most crucial to the functioning of the Congress.  4. To examine executive-legislative conflicts within comparative perspective, both intra-American and international.  5. To evaluate some prominent suggestions for Congressional reform; to place the whole question of institutional change.  6. To generate a sensitive understanding of the social and psychological dynamics of legislators, both within the formal legislative arena and between legislators and constituents.  7. To develop one or more in-class legislative gaming models to aid in comprehending the social dynamics of collegial decision-making bodies; to begin a conceptualize a general theory of collegiality.  8. To simulate a model of the U.S. Senate.  9. To understand that political disputation and argument are integral to political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse; to know that everybody is biased, and properly so.  10. To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding--and great fun.

STUDENTS:  Politics majors of upper-class status; other social science majors (history, sociology, economics, etc.):  communications majors, business majors.  This is a course for students with sophomore status or beyond.  This course is a particularly useful one to take for students who are contemplating field work or internship in Washington, D.C. during the summer of 2006.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Two classes per week with the class tending more towards the discussion mode than the lecture mode.  A major part of this course will involve an extended legislative simulation or game, with each student role-playing a specific U.S. Senator throughout the semester.

REQUIREMENTS:  1. A genuine interest in politics, or a genuine desire to learn.  2. Regular attendance at classes.  3. Careful reading of all course materials, to be completed by the dates assigned.  4. Daily reading of The New York Times.  5. Four papers. 6. Participation in an extended game model of the U.S. Senate.

GRADING:  Standard A, B, C, D, and F grades will be used.

 

310-30300-01, 02     CONSTITUTIONAL LAW:  CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES      SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext:  4-3517

ENROLLMENT:  27 per section

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  Throughout this course we will attempt to come to terms with the content, character and role of constitutional norms in modern America.  Our studies typically will begin with significant Supreme Court decisions, but we also will examine the broader political and social conflicts, debates and cultural practices involving the basic rights.  We will give attention to the role of race, class, gender, and citizenship in the scope of the judicial protection of rights.  Our inquiry will focus on two general categories of constitutionally authorized civil liberties:  1) the right of suspected criminals to due process, and 2) the rights to belief, expression, religion, and association.

STUDENTS:  Primarily politics and legal studies majors, but open to all who meet prerequisites.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Students will discuss significant Supreme Court decisions and supplementary readings.  Students will develop and present group projects that explore legal debates and analyze the significance of constitutional doctrine in political conflicts.  Students must be willing to prepare for class by briefing cases, participate in class discussions, and work in groups outside of the class period to prepare group projects. 

REQUIREMENTS:  Texts will include a casebook of Supreme Court opinions, a text concerning judicial review of anti-terrorism policies, and A Promise of Justice, by David Protess and Rob Warden.

GRADING:  Grades will be based on open-note exams, essays, and in-class presentations.

 

310-33000-01     EUROPEAN POLITICS     SS LA    

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Staff

ENROLLMENT:  28

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  We start with the question of European identity: do we only mean the EU
or something more general? Who is included or excluded, and how is this decided? Can one identify specifically European values? The course provides further background by looking at some of the key European ideological/political variations that are less familiar in the U.S. (social
democracy, Christian democracy, post-communism and the far right).Students will then examine national political systems. The emphasis will be on institutional and policy variations in how each country responds to the same needs or issues, such as economics, civil rights, immigration,
and nationalism. Special attention will be paid to the problems facing Eastern European nations. Students will also consider Europe’s interaction with the rest of the world, both at the level of a union and of the individual countries. In their institutions and responses to such concrete
problems, is there really a difference between "old" Europe and "new" Europe?  We will address tensions affecting the creation of a new geo-political entity called “Europe” out of many separate European countries. We consider the mechanisms and values of the European Union. The focus
will be on the ideals of such a union, as contrasted with the reality of including different nations with very different policy priorities.

 

310-33100-01     LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Charles R. Venator Santiago, Muller 325, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences, or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: This course will provide students with an introduction to the study of Latin America through a historical discussion of social and political social movements that have sought to challenge different forms of oppression.  The course will address Perry Anderson’s claim that the Latin American experience provides historical examples of resistance that can help us think about alternative forms of resistance to Empire.  The course also responds to a popular claim among U.S. scholars that social and political movements in Latin America have come to an end after the fall of the Soviet Union. 

FORMAT AND STYLE: Two days per week, TR 1:10 – 2:25 pm.  Students will also be expected to attend some evening film discussions which will be arranged during the semester.  Appropriate class credit will be allocated to make up for some of this time. 

GRADING: Students are expected to write several short papers and to actively participate in class.

 

310-34001-01     SELECTED TOPICS:  AFRICA THROUGH FILM     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, Ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT:  27

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in the social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  “Africa Through Film” will introduce participants to the politics, historiographies, cultures and societies of Africa through a variety of cinematic and visual lenses.  We will study power, marginality, resistance, socio-political change, memory, culture, gender relations and contested identity and interrogate some of the dominant representations of African societies and issues.  Our background readings will engage self-defining narratives, counter-narratives and alternative paradigms, so that participants gain an introduction to African societies and also discover rich and under-explored sources that elicit the complexities of the African continent.

STUDENTS:  Open to all.

REQUIREMENTS:  Attendance, active participation, essays/exams.

GRADING:  Based on above.

 

310-35000-01     SELECTED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY     SS LA TOPIC:  VARIETIES OF CONSERVATISM 3 CREDITS INSTRUCTOR:  Staff ENROLLMENT:  28 PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent. OBJECTIVES:  A critical survey of the main sources and currents of conservative thought.  We begin with the hierarchical visions of Plato, Aquinas, and Nietzsche.  Next, we look at anti-statism, from Locke to Hayek.  The third section covers conservatives who emphasize the value of tradition and scepticism about the possibility of improvement in human affairs, such as Burke and Oakeshott.  Last, we survey modern American variations on these themes, from paleocons to neocons.

 

310-37000-01  SELECTED TOPICS IN PUBLIC POLICY:  POLITICS OF WEALTH AND POVERTY    SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  27

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  The course will focus on the politics of wealth and poverty.  After an extensive consideration of various policy approaches to the global economy, the course will focus on domestic problems.  Among the topics to be covered are economic inequality, the attack on America’s modest welfare state, the working poor, and welfare reform. 

STUDENTS:  Open to all interested student who meet the prerequisites.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lecture and discussion.

REQUIREMENTS:  5-6 books, in-class midterm and final exam, research paper on a policy issue.

GRADING:  Standard.

 

310-40100-01  SEMINAR:  NATIONALISM  SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103

ENROLLMENT:  15

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of instructor; and 3 courses in social sciences or equivalent. OBJECTIVES:  To what extent are wars motivated by cultural or national identity?  Starting with this question we explore the sources of violent conflicts described as nationalist.  We'll look at the political, military, and cultural origins of the nation-state and the role of culturally-defined violence in constituting state, national, and group boundaries.  Cases will include Yugoslavia/Bosnia, Rwanda, the United States and other cases. STUDENTS: Open to interested students who meet prerequisites FORMAT AND STYLE:  Discussion REQUIREMENTS:  Attendance and active participation in seminar; reaction papers for each reading; final research paper

 

310-40100-02  SEMINAR:  EUROPEAN PARTIES AND IDEOLOGIES     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Staff

ENROLLMENT:  10

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  Ideas and ideologies are covered in other courses, so this one concentrates on how political parties translate their ideologies into specific policies. Who is addressed by, and who supports these ideologies?  How do the parties push their programs? For example, the political process may often lead to an adaptation of the ideology, or alliances/coalitions with other political forces. What role do leaders play in representing the parties’ thinking? The course focuses on the families of political parties in Europe: Social Democracy, Christian Democracy, Liberal Democrats, the Radical Right, the Communists and post-communists, the Greens, and separatist/regionalist parties. There will also be room for including different parties from other regions of the world. After briefly reviewing their philosophical roots, we turn to look at their specific policies as responses to their own definitions of what the nation’s problems are. We examine specific political conflicts to find patterns of inputs that help or hinder parties in achieving their goals. We end each unit by reflecting on the possible future of that family of parties. FORMAT AND STYLE:  Some lecture and much discussion. REQUIREMENTS:  Participation in class discussions; written, annotated bibliography on party family of your choice, and presentation thereof in class; readings. Two medium (8-12 pages) papers.  

310-40100-03   SEMINAR:  LAW, NATION AND OCCUPATION:  ISRAEL AND PALESTINE      SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent; permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES: This course will explore the role of law in the development of the Israeli state, formation of Israeli and Palestinian national identities, and the creation of the administrative infrastructure and legal norms governing the West Bank and Gaza Strip.  We will use Charles Smith’s text Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict: A History with Documents, Fifth Edition (2004), to provide historical contexts for our studies.  Our readings will include two new books, Gad Barzilai’s Communities and Law: Politics and Cultures of Legal Identities, which was awarded the best book in Israel Studies by the Association of Israel Studies in 2004, and Lisa Hajjar’s Courting Conflict: The Israeli Military Court System in the West Bank and Gaza (2005).  We will also study the role of international law and legal doctrines in defining rights in the OccupiedTerritories, including analyses of the content and significance of the International Court of Justice Opinion concerning the legality of the Separation Barrier.  Students will develop research teams that will work on projects based on their own research questions.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Classes will include discussions, debates and student presentations.

REQUIRMENTS:  Students are required to do all assigned readings, write weekly one-page papers, attend and participate in classes, develop a group research projects and complete a final 6-8 page paper. 

 

310-40400-01     TUTORIAL:  FEMINISMS 2005     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext. 4-3554

ENROLLMENT:  6

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent; permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES:     This course will explore the discussions taking place today, across the globe, about the meanings of feminisms.  We will explore the tensions which exist about the term itself as well as the possibilities for an inclusive embrace of its meaning. A key intellectual query that we will carry into the different dialogues is the meaning of biological sex—females and males—and its relationship to gender—women and men.  We will explore feminisms and women’s struggles from different sites across the globe—from Bosnia, to Algeria, to Egypt, to Rwanda….And we will position these concerns particularly within the post-sept. 11th dialogues between U.S. feminism and Afghan and Iraqi women’s understanding of their own struggles.

            The purpose of the course is to both interrogate and theorize the notion of feminisms itself.  The course readings are committed to developing a more inclusive understanding of the varieties that exist within the ideas of women’s equality, sexual freedom and rights, colonialism and economic exploitation.  Our scope is broad in the sense we are looking for a variety of diverse meanings from multiple locations.  As a result, the course will traverse different and sometimes conflicting notions of feminisms. And we will carefully query the notion that feminisms is `western’.

 

310-40400-02     TUTORIAL:  THEORY AND PRACTICE OF TOLERATION     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Staff

ENROLLMENT:  5

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent; permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES:  What are the limits of toleration?  Why have most societies in the history of the world not been tolerant?  Course covers history of the concept of toleration from its development in the 16th and 17th centuries; different regimes of toleration in Europe and the Middle East; justifications of it based on the value of public order, autonomy, happiness, moral skepticism, and political rationality; criticism of it as incoherent, repressive, ethnocentric, or inegalitarian; and contemporary issues such as hate speech, pornography, and the Salman Rushdie case.  Throughout we will try to answer questions about what toleration actually requires:  Does it require simply leaving different groups and people alone?  Does it require enabling all groups to enjoy some measure of equality?  Does it require recognition, maybe even affirmation, of tolerated groups and their ways of life?

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Discussion

REQUIREMENTS:  Two ten-page papers.

GRADING:  Standard

 

310-40500-01     INTERNSHIPS    NLA

VARIABLE CREDIT

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  10

PREREQUISITES:  Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields.  Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs.  Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas.  Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements.  Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

STUDENTS:  Interested students should see Tom Shevory, Muller 315, to register for an internship.

REQUIREMENTS:  Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work.  Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.

 

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