Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses Fall 2007

For course descriptions see below

Politics course listing Fall 2007 

(for full schedule see below the update)

UPDATE August 23:  The following new courses in the subfield of international/comparative politics have just been put on the books and still have spaces available as of today:

300-level International Relations/Comparative Politics:

POLT 40100-03
SOCIAL MOBILIZATION IN LATIN AMERICA: CAN CITIZENS MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Instructor:  PATRICIA RODRIGUEZ, MULLER 312
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is a special topics course for undergraduate students interested in
examining the issue of citizen mobilization and its impact in the context
of contemporary Latin America. We will survey the role that various social
actors have played in the authoritarian and post-authoritarian periods
throughout the region. With this intuition, the course starts with a
general discussion of Latin American politics today, in comparison with
the authoritarian period. We will then discuss theoretical debates
surrounding key issues related to the emergence and process by which
social movements may make a difference with respect to democratic
stability or change. In the second part of the course, we look at specific
issues in which social movements have made an impact -- the struggles for
human rights, labor and social rights, the ethnic rights of minorities,
the struggle against neoliberal economic policies and everyday
crime/violence, and the struggle for women's rights. We specifically
compare cases across time and across countries, to find similarities and
differences in the manner in which social movements have dealt with these
issues. The final part of the course turns students' attention to an
evaluation of Latin American democracies beyond the limits of formal
political institutions, and an assessment of what the impact of citizens
is and might be in these new democracies.
Some key questions to be addressed throughout this course are:

  • Under what circumstances have social actors organized to produce social,
    economic and political change in Latin America? On the other hand, what
    and how do political, socio-economic, and cultural factors facilitate or
    constrain the emergence and survival of social movements?
     What issues do citizens mobilize for? What strategies/tactics are used
    to achieve objective? How organized are these movements and how does that
    matter? What are their specific demands? What have been the consequences
    of activism? How can we measure and evaluate movements' effectiveness
  • What has the exercise of citizenship meant in authoritarian and
    post-authoritarian context? What does participation in protest activity
    mean for groups that have not fully benefited from the promises of
    democracy? Is social protest good or bad for democracy?
  • Can alternative projects offered by social movements offer solutions to ease social problems in Latin America? What lessons can be drawn from each case? Can these lessons be adapted to other countries and contexts?

POLT 34006-01
SELECTED TOPICS:  Nationalism in Europe, China, and India
PROFESSOR:  ISHAN JOSHI, MULLER 314
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
What is a nation? What does it mean to be a part of a nation? Where does
this identity come from? What holds it together? This course examines the
theory and practice of nationalism from a variety of perspectives:
political, linguistic, economic, and philosophical.  This course studies
these questions in a comparative context, first examining the historical
origins of nationalism in Europe and then focusing on the more
contemporary periods of nationalism and development in China and the
Indian subcontinent.  Our approach is theoretical, historical, and
comparative.

------------------------------

Tutorials (400 level)

POLT 40300-02
TUTORIAL:  GAME THEORY IN POLITICS
Instructor:  ISHAN JOSHI, MULLER 314
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This tutorial focuses on formal, game-theoretic approaches to the study of
politics.  Students will be free to select research topics of their
interest (in global studies or international affairs) and begin to examine
these question using elementary tools in applied game theory.

POLT 40300-01
Tutorial: Militarization of Daily Life (Comparative and International
Studies )
Instructor: Kelly Dietz
Course description:  From fashion trends and Hollywood films to military recruitment in schools
and the siting of military bases, this course examines the ways in which
people and even whole communities become objects of militarization. The
course takes a broad view of militarization as an everyday, "peacetime"
process in order to better understand our relationship to state power as
individuals, as citizens, and as members of local and global communities.
Through readings, films, music and your own experiences, we will explore
the processes that give rise to and sustain militarization--and the ways
in which we are all complicit in the militarization of daily life.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Previously scheduled courses:

100 level courses:

U.S. Politics - 20058 - POLT 10100 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF Friends Hall 209 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)

U.S. Politics - 20066 - POLT 10100 - 02
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Smiddy Hall 114 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)

U.S. Politics - 20090 - POLT 10100 - 03
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Smiddy Hall 114 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Alexander C. Moon (P)

U.S. Politics - 20073 - POLT 10100 - 04
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Thomas C Shevory (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 8:00 am - 9:15 am TR Smiddy Hall 111 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Thomas C. Shevory (P)

U.S. Politics - 20097 - POLT 10100 - 05
Students registering for POLT 10100-05 LEC must also register for one of the DIS sessions 06-11.
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm TR Textor Hall 101 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 20103 - POLT 10100 - 06
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm M Chapel PHIL Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 22992 - POLT 10100 - 07
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm W Chapel PHIL Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 23489 - POLT 10100 - 08
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm F Chapel PHIL Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 22993 - POLT 10100 - 09
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 5:25 pm - 6:15 pm M Friends Hall 304 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 23490 - POLT 10100 - 10
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 5:25 pm - 6:15 pm W Friends Hall 304 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 22994 - POLT 10100 - 11
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm R Friends Hall 201 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

Politics and Society - 23653 - POLT 12200 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Patricia Rodriguez
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 9:25 am - 10:40 am TR Friends Hall 303 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture

Politics and Society - 23654 - POLT 12200 - 02
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Patricia Rodriguez
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:35 pm - 3:50 pm TR Friends Hall 303 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture

Introduction to International Relations - 20250 - POLT 12800 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Chip P Gagnon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Smiddy Hall 107 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Chip P. Gagnon (P)

Introduction to International Relations - 20260 - POLT 12800 - 02
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Chip P Gagnon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Smiddy Hall 108 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Chip P. Gagnon (P)

Introduction to Global Studies - 20264 - POLT 12900 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors:
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:10 pm - 2:25 pm TR Smiddy Hall 111 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture TBA

Introduction to Global Studies - 23655 - POLT 12900 - 02
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors:
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:35 pm - 3:50 pm TR Smiddy Hall 111 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture TBA

Power: Race, Sex, and Class - 23650 - POLT 14100 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Zillah R Eisenstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 9:25 am - 10:40 am TR Textor Hall 102 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Zillah R. Eisenstein (P)

Ideas and Ideologies - 20276 - POLT 14200 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Kelly Dietz
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Williams Hall 323 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture TBA

Ideas and Ideologies - 20282 - POLT 14200 - 02
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Kelly Dietz
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF Williams Hall 323 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture TBA

Politics of Identity - 23000 - POLT 14500 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Asma Barlas (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:10 pm - 2:25 pm TR Center for Health Sciences 202 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Asma Barlas (P)

200 level courses

Honors Intermediate Seminar: Politics of Popular Music - 23001 - POLT 20230 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Humanities, Liberal Arts
Instructors: Thomas C Shevory (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm TR Roy H. Park Communications 285 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Thomas C. Shevory (P)

The Holocaust - 20291 - POLT 23000 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm TR Friends Hall 304 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Donald W. Beachler (P)

Globalization Studies - 23176 - POLT 24500 - 99
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts
London Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry



Field Study: Politics - 20301 - POLT 29900 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Non-Liberal Arts
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Ithaca Campus
Independent Study Schedule Type
Research/Directed Study Instructional Method
1.000 TO 6.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class TBA   TBA Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Independent Study Donald W. Beachler (P)

300 level courses:

Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties - 23651 - POLT 30300 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF Friends Hall 309 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Alexander C. Moon (P)

Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties - 23652 - POLT 30300 - 02
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm MWF Friends Hall 309 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Alexander C. Moon (P)


The Media & the Military - 20323 - POLT 31900 - 80
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Thomas W Bohn (P)
Washington Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class TBA   TBA Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Thomas W. Bohn (P)

European Politics - 20335 - POLT 33000 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF Smiddy Hall 114 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)

Whiteness and Multiculturalism - 23649 - POLT 33600 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Chip P Gagnon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
Syllabus Available
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF Friends Hall 306 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Chip P. Gagnon (P)

Selected Topics in Politics - 23657 - POLT 34006 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days

 
Politics of Wealth & Poverty - 20367 - POLT 37000 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm MW Friends Hall 309 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Lecture Donald W. Beachler (P)

400 level courses:

Sem: European Parties & Ideologies - 20403 - POLT 40100 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm M Friends Hall 307 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Seminar Juan M. Arroyo (P)

Seminar: Elsewheres - 20407 - POLT 40100 - 02
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Zillah R Eisenstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 3:00 pm - 5:30 pm W Smiddy Hall 111 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Seminar Zillah R. Eisenstein (P)

Seminar: Social Mobilization in Latin America - 23659 - POLT 40100 - 03
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructor: Patricia Rodriguez
Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm M Friends Hall 102 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Seminar TBA

Sem: Machiavelli - 23009 - POLT 40200 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 6:50 pm - 9:20 pm W Friends Hall 308 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Seminar Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

Tutorial: Militarization of Daily Life - 23010 - POLT 40300 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructor: Kelly Dietz
Ithaca Campus
Tutorial Schedule Type
Tutorial Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 6:50 pm - 9:20 pm M Friends Hall 204 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Tutorial TBA

Tutorial: Comparative and International Studies - 23778 - POLT 40300 - 02
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Ithaca Campus
Tutorial Schedule Type
Tutorial Instructional Method
1.000 TO 4.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 5:25 pm - 6:40 pm MW Friends Hall 205 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Tutorial TBA

Tutorial: Theory & Practice of Toleration - 20429 - POLT 40400 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Tutorial Schedule Type
Tutorial Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class 6:50 pm - 9:20 pm T Friends Hall 204 Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Tutorial Alexander C. Moon (P)

Internship: Politics - 23749 - POLT 40500 - 01
Associated Term: Fall 2007
Registration Dates: Apr 02, 2007 to Dec 21, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Non-Liberal Arts
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Ithaca Campus
Internship Schedule Type
Internship Instructional Method
1.000 TO 12.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Where Date Range Schedule Type Instructors Class TBA   TBA Aug 29, 2007 - Dec 21, 2007 Internship Donald W. Beachler (P)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Course Descriptions

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS

The curriculum is designed to give students an understanding of political organization and political forces in modern society, to provide knowledge and a basis for insight and judgment on the problems involved in the relationship of the individual to government and of governments to one another.  Students are prepared for the intelligent performance of the functions of citizenship, for careers in public service, foreign relations, teaching at the secondary level, the study of law and for study at the graduate level.

 

POLT 10100-01, 02      U.S. POLITICS       SS LA 1b h 3 CREDITS INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 312, Ext. 4-3969 ENROLLMENT: 24 per section PREREQUISITES: None OBJECTIVES:  Institutions, processes, and cultural/ideological roots of U.S. politics.  We begin by studying a framework of ideologies that will help us to understand the political-economic institutions that have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society: Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process. Throughout, we will constantly ask: how democratic is this place? What are your criteria for measuring democracy? Analysis of specific policies, such as social security, abortion, the drinking age, health care, taxes, etc. STUDENTS:  Open to all students. FORMAT AND STYLE:  Discussion/lecture

 

POLT 10100-03           U.S. POLITICS      SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258

ENROLLMENT:  24

PREREQUISITES:  None

OBJECTIVES. This course has three main purposes.  In ascending order of importance, it seeks to familiarize students with the role of voters, interest groups, the media, and parties in the American political system.  We will examine the dynamics of American political institutions and (some of) the origins of (some of) the current political cleavages in the U.S.; it will examine the gap between the ideals and practices of American politics.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lecture/discussion

 

POLT-10100-04     U.S. POLITICS     SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Tom Shevory, Muller 315, Ext. 4-1347

ENROLLMENT:  25

PREREQUISITES:  None

OBJECTIVES:  Course involves critical approaches to U.S. politics.  A historical overview is provided, including attention to arguments regarding the meaning of the constitution and contemporary criticism of it.  An analysis and critique of the U.S. political economy is offered with specific reference to challenges and opportunities resulting from ?globalization.?  Institutional aspects of U.S. politics are considered:  Congress, the Presidency, the courts, and the electoral system.  Civil rights and liberties are discussed in relation to issues of race and gender.  Considerable attention is given to American foreign policy, particularly the war in Iraq. 

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lecture/discussion.

REQUIREMENTS:  Three take-home exams.  Books include:  Robert
Dahl, How Democratic is the American Constitution, Jeremy Rifkin, The European Dream,  Mike Royko, Boss, Evan Wright, Generation Kill.

GRADING:  Standard

 

POLT-10100-05  U.S. POLITICS  SS LA 1b h

NOTE:  ENROLLING IN THIS SECTION REQUIRES YOU TO ENROLL IN A DISCUSSION SECTION

(10100-06 THROUGH 11)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544.

ENROLLMENT: Lecture: 90; each discussion section: 15

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: 1) To define the reality of who actually holds political power in America. 2) To describe the institutional structures and processes of American political life. 3) To underscore the interrelationship of economics, race and politics in the United States. 4) To appreciate the sexual political tensions that infuse American politics; to recognize the centrality of feminism and gay liberation in contemporary American politics. 5) To comprehend the subtleties of personality that cause variation with the predictable patterns of American politics. 6) To understand both the repressive reality and the potential for hope and progress in American politics. 7) To understand that political disputation and argument are integral in political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse; to know that everybody is biased, and properly so. 8) To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding and great fun.

STUDENTS: A wide variety of students is encouraged to enroll in this lower-level course. Politics majors as well as majors from economics, history, and other humanities and social science majors are welcomed, as are students from business, communication, and other professional programs. Seniors welcome.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

REQUIREMENTS: Four essays and five to six books.

GRADING: Standard; re-writes welcomed.

 

POLT-12200-01, 02   POLITICS AND SOCIETY      SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Patricia Rodriguez

ENROLLMENT:  28 per section

PREREQUISITES:  None

OBJECTIVES: This course introduces several themes in the study of politics and society, and applies them in the context of recent events. We will examine issues such as the institutional arrangements in democratic and non-democratic regimes, the extent to which political institutions and political action are capable of reshaping society and contribute to stability or crisis, and the prospects and problems confronting established and new democratic countries. We will master core concepts in political science and get acquainted with the history and politics of North Korea, Russia, Venezuela, Chile, and several European nations.

 

POLT-12800-01, 02   INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS   SS LA 1b, g
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:  Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103
ENROLLMENT:  27 per section
PREREQUISITES:  None.
OBJECTIVES:  We examine and discuss issues of security ranging from security of the state to security of individuals. Issues include the future of war, terrorism, the global economy, nationalism, ethnic and religious conflict, and the role of the media in how we think about the international.  We also study how different perspectives lead us to see different worlds, looking specifically at realism, liberalism, global humanism, and theories of identity.
STUDENTS:  Open to all.
FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lectures, discussions, films.
REQUIREMENTS:  Attendance and participation in class discussions; readings for each class; three take-home exam essays.
GRADING:  Standard, based on above requirements.

 

POLT 12900-01, 02      INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES      SS LA 1b g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: TBA

ENROLLMENT: 24 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: The connections between the industrialized nations of Europe, North America, and the Pacific (the ?North?) and the ?third-world? nations of Africa, Asia, and Latin America (the ?South?).  From interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspectives, the course examines a number of global issues?that is, issues transcending national boundaries, such as food and famine; population; foreign and national security and militarism.  National and international public policies relating to these issues are examined critically and policy alternatives are explored, as are individual responses and responsibilities.  The course emphasizes geographic literacy and global awareness.  Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses:  POLT 12900, ANTH 12900, HPS12900. 

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussions, and collaborative work.

STUDENTS: Open to all interested students

 

POLT 14100-01     POWER: RACE, SEX AND CLASS     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext. 4-3554

ENROLLMENT:38

OBJECTIVES:We will deal with the distribution of power in the U.S. according to economic class, sex, and race hierarchies.  We discuss what power is, where it comes from, where it is located.  This involves the analysis of power in terms of issues of capitalism, globalism, patriarchy, and racism, as well as the specific issues they raise for policy making, persons, the family, and corporate power.  The analysis will hopefully help us understand the relations of power defining black working class women, white male workers, white middle class women, etc.  The premise of the course is that in order to understand capitalist society one must understand the racialized aspects of sexuality as a form of power, as well as the sexualized aspects of race.  Some specific topics discussed are: the changing aspects of the nation-state; Reagan/Clinton/Bush political discourses; the Gulf Wars 1991-2007; the Chilean 1973 Coup; the changing realities of the middle/working class; the global racialized sexual division of labor; the rise of China in the global market; the O.J. Simpson trial, and so on.

STUDENTS:Majors and non-majors alike.

REQUIREMENTS:Students will read a variety of books, write two 7-page analytical papers.

 

 

POLT 14200-01, 02     IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES      SS LA 1a, 1b

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

OBJECTIVES: What makes certain kinds of power legitimate and other kinds suspect? Can there be freedom without justice? Is freedom an individual endeavor or a collective project? Is democracy something that can be imposed on a society from outside, or must it emerge from within? This course explores these and other fundamental questions concerning how political life is organized. We will examine a range of views on the nature of ideas such as freedom, justice, authority, and legitimacy, with emphasis on why these concepts have endured and are essential to understanding politics today. The course will also explore how these concepts relate to ideological perspectives on political life, such as liberation, democracy, conservatism, communism, and nationalism.

 

 

POLT-14500-01 POLITICS OF IDENTITY:  CULTURE, RACE, AND ETHNICITY

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Asma Barlas, CHS 101, Ext. 4-3557

ENROLLMENT:  20

PREREQUISITIES:  None; students who took POLT-12000-01 (FYS) may not take this course for credit.

OBJECTIVES:  In this course, we will examine how people?s conceptions of race and ethnicity impact their sense of themselves and of others. Our aim in doing this will be (a) to enable a critical engagement with your own identity, and (b) to explore the social implications of identity differences.  The course won?t give you any pre-set answers, though!  Instead, it will allow you to engage such open-ended questions as: what is race?  Do racial and cultural diversity threaten ?national unity??  What are the social and psychological implications of thinking in terms of Self/ Other, white/ black, similarity/ difference?  Why are people invested in the idea of difference?  Do women and men have similar attitudes to race (and racism)?  Is being color-blind the same as being antiracist?  Is it possible to feel solidarity with people who are different from oneself?

Texts: Patrick Buchanan, The Death of the West; William Finnegan, Cold New World;  bell hooks, Black Looks; and Ruth Frankenberg, White Women, Race Matters.

FORMAT:  Discussions, led by students.

 

POLT-23000-01   THE HOLOCAUST    SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  27

PREREQUISITES:  One social science or humanities course

OBJECTIVES:  This course is an introductory survey of major issues related to the Holocaust.  We will examine the role of Anti-Semitism in Western Culture and the rise of the racial anti-Semitism that animated Nazi hatred of the Jews.  Among the topics to be covered are:  The rise of Hitler to power; the initial policies of persecution and dispossession of the Jews and Jewish responses to these policies; the evolution of Nazi policy from expulsion of the Jews to extermination;  the role of Jewish community leadership in attempting to cope with a murderous onslaught by establishing Jews in vital industries; the cooperation of many German bureaucrats in the final solution; the relationship of the Holocaust to the Nazi?s overall racial views and their war of racial supremacy in eastern Europe; the ongoing controversy over whether more Jews could have been rescued by the nations opposing Hitler and his regime.

 

POLT 29900-01   FIELD STUDY

(SEE POLT 40500 INTERNSHIPS FOR FURTHER INFORMATION)

1 TO 6 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  5

PREREQUISITES:  POLT 10100, one other course in the social sciences, and permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES:  Opportunity for students to explore and experience facets of political life through work experience and/or field research.  Academic credit contingent upon completion of study design with departmental faculty member.  (Course may not be used to satisfy 100-level distribution requirements.)

 

POLT 30300-01, 02     CONSTITUTIONAL LAW:  CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES    SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alexander Moon, Muller 308, Ext:  4-1258

ENROLLMENT:  24 per section

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: We will examine the genesis, content, and role of constitutional norms in modern America.  Our studies typically will begin with significant Supreme Court decisions and the political and social conflicts, debates, and cultural practices which form their context.  Our inquiry will focus on two general categories of constitutionally authorized civil liberties:  1) the right of suspected criminals to due process, and 2) the rights to belief, expression, religion, and association.

STUDENTS:  Primarily politics and legal studies majors, but open to all who meet prerequisites.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Students will discuss significant Supreme Court decisions and supplementary readings.  Students will develop and present group projects that explore legal debates and analyze the significance of constitutional doctrine in political conflicts.  Students must be willing to prepare for class by briefing cases, participate in class discussions, and work in groups outside of the class period to prepare group projects. 

GRADING:  Grades will be based on open-note exams, essays, and in-class presentations.

 

POLT 33000-01    EUROPEAN POLITICS    
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:  Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT:  24
PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES:  We start with the question of European identity: do we only mean the EU or something more general? Who is included or excluded, and how is this decided? Can one identify specifically European values? We will address tensions affecting the creation of a new geo-political entity called "Europe" out of many separate European countries. We consider the structures and values of the European Union. The focus will be on the ideals of such a union, as contrasted with the reality of including different nations with very different policy priorities. The course provides further background by looking at some of the key European ideological/political variations that are less familiar in the U.S. (Social Democracy, Christian Democracy, post-Communism and the far right). Students will examine the political systems of selected European countries, with their distinct sets of actors and policy priorities. The emphasis will be on institutional and policy variations in how each country responds to the same needs or issues, such as economics, civil rights, immigration, regional identity, and nationalism. Students will also consider Europe's interaction with the rest of the world, both at the level of a union and of the individual countries.

POLT-33600-01   WHITENESS AND MULTICULTURALISM  SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:  Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103.
ENROLLMENT:  20
PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES:  The course interrogates the concept of "Whiteness" and relates it to conceptualizations of multiculturalism, tackling these issues at the theoretical level but also comparatively at the empirical level.  Cases
include the United States as well as other western and nonwestern societies.  The goal of the course is to foreground the category of White, with the goal of recognizing its meanings, the effect it has on White and non-White individuals, and the relationship of whiteness to power, factors that too often are invisible in discussions of race.  It also seeks to bring about a critical rethinking of the concept of multiculturalism by exploring how some forms of multiculturalism serve to reinforce the hegemony of whiteness.
STUDENTS: Open to all students
FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion and lecture
REQUIREMENTS: A variety of readings, discussions, written reactions to readings.

 

POLT 34006-01    SELECTED TOPICS:  TBA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  TBA

ENROLLMENT:  24

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  Matters of special contemporary interest to students and faculty may be developed under this course heading. 

 

POLT-37000-01  SELECTED TOPICS IN PUBLIC POLICY    SS LA

POLITICS OF WEALTH AND POVERTY    

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  28

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  The course will focus on the politics of wealth and poverty.  After an extensive consideration of various policy approaches to the global economy, the course will focus on domestic problems.  Among the topics to be covered are economic inequality, the attack on America?s modest welfare state, the working poor, and welfare reform. 

STUDENTS:  Open to all interested student who meet the prerequisites.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lecture and discussion.

REQUIREMENTS:  5-6 books, in-class midterm and final exam, research paper on a policy issue.

GRADING:  Standard

 

  POLT-40100-01     SEMINAR     SS LA TOPIC:  EUROPEAN PARTIES AND IDEOLOGIES
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo
ENROLLMENT:  10
PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent. 
OBJECTIVES:  Ideas and ideologies are covered in other courses, so this one concentrates on how political parties translate their ideologies into specific policies. Who is addressed by, and who supports these ideologies? How do the parties push their programs? For example, the political process may often lead to an adaptation of the ideology, or alliances/coalitions with other political forces. What role do leaders play in representing the parties? thinking? The course focuses on the families of political parties in Europe: Social Democracy, Christian Democracy, Liberal Democrats, the Radical Right, the Communists and post-communists, the Greens, and separatist/regionalist parties. There will also be room for including different parties from other regions of the world. After briefly reviewing their philosophical roots, we turn to look at their specific policies as responses to their own definitions of what the nation?s problems are. We examine specific political conflicts to find patterns of inputs that help or hinder parties in achieving their goals. We end each unit by reflecting on the possible future of that family of parties.
FORMAT AND STYLE:  Some lecture and much discussion.
REQUIREMENTS:  Participation in class discussions; written, annotated bibliography on party family of your choice, and presentation thereof in class; readings. Two medium (about 15 pages) papers, to be incorporated into the final one of approx. 30 pages.

POLT 40100-02     SEMINAR:  ELSEWHERES     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, ext. 4-3554

ENROLLMENT:  15

PREPREQUISITES:  The usual expected preparation for a seminar level course.

OBJECTIVES:  This course asks you to think deeply about what you see and the way you see it; what you look at and what you don?t, and why. The course is committed to enlarging the viewpoints from which we see and while doing so uncovering the powerful positioning of living and seeing from an imperial site, the U.S.  I HOPE TO UNSETTLE THE INTELLECTUAL BORDERS THAT HAVE BECOME NATURALIZED AND NORMALIZED; SAME/DIFFERENCE; SELF/OTHER; NATURE/CULTURE; WHITE/BLACK; ETC.  The course has evolved out of, and along with my newest research, travel, and writing related to the deconstruction and reconstruction of the so-called WEST/NON-WEST divide.  I ask students to rethink their thinking about what this divide invokes, both historically and contemporarily.  Some questions we will entertain are:  ARE THE ORIGINS OF DEMOCRATIC THEORY TRULY OR SIMPLY OF THE WEST?  WHAT ROLE DOES THE SLAVE TRADE PLAY IN THESE FORMULATIONS?  HOW DO THE EVENTS OF Sept 11, 2001, AND THEIR AFTERMATHS INFORM AND IMPACT THIS DISCUSSION?  Some of the authors we will read:  M. Bernal, G. Deleuze, A. Roy; A. Rashid, S. Rushdie, W.E.B. Dubois, H. Zinn, Z. Eisenstein.

REQUIREMENTS:  There will be two eight-page analytic papers and students are expected to participate fully in discussion each and every class.

 

POLT  40100-03     SEMINAR: Comp/IR: Social Mobilization in Latin America      SS LA
TOPIC: 
Social Mobilization in Latin America
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: This course examines the issue of citizen mobilization and its impact in the context of contemporary Latin America. We will survey the role that various social actors have played in the authoritarian and post-authoritarian periods throughout the region. With this intuition, the course starts with a general discussion of Latin American politics today, in comparison with the authoritarian period. We will then discuss theoretical debates surrounding key issues related to the emergence and process by which social movements may make a difference with respect to democratic stability or change. In the second part of the course, we look at specific issues in which social movements have made an impact -- the struggles for human rights, labor and social rights, the ethnic rights of minorities, the struggle against neoliberal economic policies and everyday crime/violence, and the struggle for women’s rights. We specifically compare cases across time and across countries, to find similarities and differences in the manner in which social movements have dealt with these issues. The final part of the course turns students’ attention to an evaluation of Latin American democracies beyond the limits of formal political institutions, and an assessment of what the impact of citizens is and might be in these new democracies.

 

POLT 40200-01     SEMINAR:  MACHIAVELLI     SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:  Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext 4-3544
ENROLLMENT:  10
PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES:  To study the major works of Machiavelli closely and in analytical detail; to assess the aptness and relevance of Machiavelli for contemporary politics; to evaluate Machiavelli as an exemplar and critic of democratic thought.  This course will focus on The Prince and Discourses, but we will also read The Art of War and La Mandragola as well as several commentaries. 
STUDENTS:  Predominantly upper-level politics majors and minors, but all interested upper-level students are invited to apply.
FORMAT AND STYLE:  One seminar meeting per week, with heavy emphasis on lively class discussion.
REQUIREMENTS:  Approximately ten to twelve books will be required.  Three take-home essay examinations will be required.
GRADING:  Traditional A-F grading will be used.


POLT 40400-01     TUTORIAL     SS LA
TOPIC:  THEORY AND PRACTICE OF TOLERATION

3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:  Alex Moon
ENROLLMENT:  5
PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES:  What are the limits of toleration?  Why have most societies in the history of the world not been tolerant?  Course covers history of the concept of toleration from its development in the 16th and 17th centuries; justifications of it based on the value of public order, autonomy, happiness, moral skepticism, and political rationality; criticism of it as incoherent, repressive, ethnocentric, or inegalitarian; and contemporary issues such as hate speech, pornography, and the Salman Rushdie case.  Throughout we will try to answer questions about what toleration actually requires:  Does it require simply leaving different groups and people alone?  Does it require enabling all groups to enjoy some measure of equality?  Does it require recognition, maybe even affirmation, of tolerated groups and their ways of life?
FORMAT AND STYLE:  Discussion
REQUIREMENTS:  Two ten-page papers.
GRADING:  Standard

 

POLT  40300-01     TUTORIAL:  Comp/IR:  Militarization of Daily Life    SS LA
TOPIC: Militarization of Daily Life  
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:  Kelly Dietz
ENROLLMENT:  5 per section
PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: From fashion trends and Hollywood films to military recruitment in schools and the siting of military bases, this course examines the ways in which people and even whole communities become objects of militarization. The course takes a broad view of militarization as an everyday, “peacetime” process in order to better understand our relationship to state power as individuals, as citizens, and as members of local and global communities. Through readings, films, music and your own experiences, we will explore the processes that give rise to and sustain militarization―and the ways in which we are all complicit in the militarization of daily life.

POLT  40300-02     TUTORIAL:  COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES     SS LA TOPIC:   TBA 3 CREDITS INSTRUCTOR:  TBA ENROLLMENT:  5 per section PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent. OBJECTIVES:  Individual investigation of selected topics in politics through readings, written reports, and essays under tutorial supervision. 

POLT 40500-01    INTERNSHIPS    NLA

VARIABLE CREDIT

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Bleachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  10

PREREQUISITES:  Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields.  Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs.  Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas.  Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements.  Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

STUDENTS:  Interested students should see Tom Shevory, Muller 315, to register for an internship.

REQUIREMENTS:  Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work.  Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.

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