Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses Fall 2008

For course descriptions see below

Class Schedule Listing

100 Level courses

U.S. Politics - 20052 - POLT 10100 - 01

Associated Term: Fall 2008
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P
3.000 Credits
Class 9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF Friends Hall 309 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)

U.S. Politics - 20059 - POLT 10100 - 02
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Williams Hall 224 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)

U.S. Politics - 20075 - POLT 10100 - 03
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Thomas C Shevory (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 8:00 am - 9:15 am TR Friends Hall 308 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Thomas C. Shevory (P)

U.S. Politics - 20065 - POLT 10100 - 04
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Thomas C Shevory (P)
3.000 Credit
Class 2:35 pm - 3:50 pm TR Williams Hall 202 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Thomas C. Shevory (P)

U.S. Politics - 20082 - POLT 10100 - 05
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm TR Textor Hall 103 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

US Politics discussion sections:

U.S. Politics - 20088 - POLT 10100 - 06
Class 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm M Center for Natural Sciences 118 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 22500 - POLT 10100 - 07
Class 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm W Center for Natural Sciences 118 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 22783 - POLT 10100 - 08
Class 5:25 pm - 6:15 pm M Friends Hall 301 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 22501 - POLT 10100 - 09
Class 5:25 pm - 6:15 pm W Friends Hall 301 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 22784 - POLT 10100 - 10
Class 5:25 pm - 6:15 pm T Friends Hall 307 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

U.S. Politics - 22502 - POLT 10100 - 11
Class 5:25 pm - 6:15 pm R Friends Hall 307 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Discussion Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

 

Politics and Society - 22939 - POLT 12200 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Patricia M Rodriguez (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF Williams Hall 323 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Patricia M. Rodriguez (P)E-mail

Politics and Society - 22940 - POLT 12200 - 02
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Patricia M Rodriguez (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Williams Hall 323 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Patricia M. Rodriguez 

 

Political Justice - 23560 - POLT 12300 - 01
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)
3.000 Credit
Class 9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF Center for Natural Sciences 333 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Beth E. Harris (P)

Political Justice - 23562 - POLT 12300 - 02
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)
3.000 Credit
Class 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Center for Natural Sciences 333 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Beth E. Harris (P)

 

Introduction to International Relations - 20228 - POLT 12800 - 01
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Chip Gagnon (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Williams Hall 317 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Chip Gagnon (P)

Introduction to International Relations - 20237 - POLT 12800 - 02
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Chip Gagnon (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Williams Hall 317 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Chip P. Gagnon (P)

 

Introduction to Global Studies - 20240 - POLT 12900 - 01
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Peyi S Soyinka-Airewele (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 9:25 am - 10:40 am TR Friends Hall 304 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P)

Introduction to Global Studies - 22941 - POLT 12900 - 02
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Peyi S Soyinka-Airewele (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm TR Friends Hall 304 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P)

 

Ideas and Ideologies - 20250 - POLT 14200 - 0
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Kelly L Dietz (P)
3.000 Credit
Class 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Friends Hall 207 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Kelly L. Dietz (P)E-mail

Ideas and Ideologies - 20255 - POLT 14200 - 02
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Kelly L Dietz (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF Friends Hall 207 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Kelly L. Dietz 

Ideas and Ideologies - 23580 - POLT 14200 - 0
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander Moon
3.000 Credits
Class 2:35 pm - 3:50 pm TR Friends Hall 301 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Alexander Moon

Ideas and Ideologies - 23581 - POLT 14200 - 04
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander Moon
3.000 Credits
Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm TR Friends Hall 301 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Alexander Moon

 

Understanding Capitalism - 23577 - POLT 14300 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Naeem Inayatullah (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 9:25 am - 10:40 am TR Williams Hall 221 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Naeem Inayatullah (P)

Understanding Capitalism - 23578 - POLT 14300 - 02
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Naeem Inayatullah (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 1:10 pm - 2:25 pm TR Hill Center 57 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Naeem Inayatullah (P)

 

Politics of Identity - 22503 - POLT 14500 - 01
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Asma Barlas (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 1:10 pm - 2:25 pm TR Center for Health Sciences 201 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Asma Barlas (P)

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200 level courses

The Holocaust - 20264 - POLT 23000 - 01
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Class 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Hill Center 57 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Donald W. Beachler (P)

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300 level courses


US politics

U.S. Party Politics - 23693 - POLT 30400 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 2:35 pm - 3:50 pm TR Williams Hall 221 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

 

U.S. Foreign Policy - 23340 - POLT 30600 - 80
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Washington Campus
3.000 Credits
Class TBA TBA Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture TBA

 

Supreme Court in U.S. Politics - 23584 - POLT 31000 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF Smiddy Hall 325 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Beth E. Harris (P)

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International Relations/Comparative Politics

European Politics - 20299 - POLT 33000 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF Center for Natural Sciences 118 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)

 

Africa through Film: Images and Reality - 23582 - POLT 33200 - 01
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Peyi S Soyinka-Airewele (P)
3.000 Credit
Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm TR Williams Hall 218 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P)

 

Selected Topics IR/Comparative: Understanding Islam - 23583 - POLT 34002 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Asma Barlas (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm TR Smiddy Hall 325 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Asma Barlas (P)

 

Selected Topics IR/Comparative: Human Rights in Latin America - 23627 - POLT 34003 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Patricia M Rodriguez (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF Williams Hall 219 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Patricia M. Rodriguez

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Political Theory

Selected Topics: Theory and Practice of Tolerance 23609 - POLT 35000 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander Moon
3.000 Credits
Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm TR Smiddy Hall 114 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Alexander Moon

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Public Policy

Politics of Wealth & Poverty - 20325 - POLT 37000 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm MW Friends Hall 301 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Lecture Donald W. Beachler (P)

 

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400 level courses

Seminar (Int\'l/Comparative): Catholics and Politics - 20359 - POLT 40100 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm M Friends Hall 102 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Seminar Juan M. Arroyo (P)

 

Seminar (Int\'l /Comparative): Love, Hate, Sexual Desire Under Colonialism - 20363 - POLT 40100 - 02
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Naeem Inayatullah (P)
3.000 Credits
Class 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm W Friends Hall 102 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Seminar Naeem Inayatullah (P)

 

Seminar (Int\'l/Comparative): Militarization - 22944 - POLT 40100 - 03
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Kelly L Dietz (P)
3.000 Credit
Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm MW Friends Hall 303 Aug 27, 2008 - Dec 19, 2008 Seminar Kelly L. Dietz (P)E-mail

 

Internship: Politics - 23018 - POLT 40500 - 01
Attributes: Non-Liberal Arts
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
1.000 TO 12.000 Credits
In order to arrange for-credit internships, see Prof. Beachler  

 

Directed Study (Independent Study): Politics - 23196 - POLT 49900 - 01
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Independent Study
1.000 TO 5.000 Credits

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Fall 2009 Course Descriptions

(from the H&S Supplement)

POLT 10100-01, 02 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1b h
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 24 per section
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: Institutions, processes, and cultural/ideological roots of U.S. politics. We begin by studying a framework of ideologies that will help us to understand the political-economic institutions that have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society: Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process. Throughout, we will constantly ask: how democratic is this place? What are your criteria for measuring democracy? Students will be invited to consider how money affects the ability of citizens to influence the political process. Analysis of specific policies may include social security, abortion, health care, taxes, civil liberties, foreign policy, etc.
STUDENTS: Open to all students.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion/lecture
REQUIREMENTS: Readings, active participation in class discussions, 2-3 short papers (3-5 pages), 1 medium paper (5-7 pages), final paper (7-10 pages)

POLT 10100-03 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1b h
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES. This course has three main purposes. In ascending order of importance, it seeks to familiarize students with the role of voters, interest groups, the media, and parties in the American political system. We will examine the dynamics of American political institutions and (some of) the origins of (some of) the current political cleavages in the U.S.; it will examine the gap between the ideals and practices of American politics.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture/discussion

POLT 10100-04 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1b h
NOTE: ENROLLING IN THIS SECTION REQUIRES YOU TO ENROLL IN A DISCUSSION SECTION (10100-05 THROUGH 08)
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544.
ENROLLMENT: Lecture: 60; each discussion section: 15
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: 1) To define the reality of who actually holds political power in America. 2) To describe the institutional structures and processes of American political life. 3) To underscore the interrelationship of economics, race and politics in the United States. 4) To appreciate the sexual political tensions that infuse American politics; to recognize the centrality of feminism and gay liberation in contemporary American politics. 5) To comprehend the subtleties of personality that cause variation with the predictable patterns of American politics. 6) To understand both the repressive reality and the potential for hope and progress in American politics. 7) To understand that political disputation and argument are integral in political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse; to know that everybody is biased, and properly so. 8) To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding and great fun.
STUDENTS: A wide variety of students is encouraged to enroll in this lower-level course. Politics majors as well as majors from economics, history, and other humanities and social science majors are welcomed, as are students from business, communication, and other professional programs. Seniors welcome.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
REQUIREMENTS: Three essays and five to six books.
GRADING: Standard; re-writes welcomed.

POLT 12200-01, 02 POLITICS AND SOCIETY SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: This introductory course explores the impact of social forces and societal dynamics on politics of diverse countries, as well as the influence of politics and the state on society. The course is structured as a series of questions that address the main themes of the course and current world events: democracy and democratic breakdown, sources and consequences of state power, reasons and consequences of revolutionary action, impact of citizen activism in global and national political and economic issues, and the role of international actors in reconstructing governments. In the process of examining these issues we will also learn about the history and political events in a variety of countries, such as Chile, North Korea, Russia, Venezuela, Sudan, China, and others.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion
GRADING: short opinion papers, exams, discussion & presentations

POLT 12300-01, 02 POLITICAL JUSTICE SS LA 1b g
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517
ENROLLMENT: 27 per section
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: We examine the relationships between law, politics, power, witnessing, and justice in a comparative context. The readings and films draw on a number of disciplinary and professional approaches, including law, the social sciences, the humanities, and journalism. We use case studies to analyze conflicts between nation building/national security strategies and those social and politics groups whose civil liberties are threatened by official legal and political strategies. The case studies may explore: 1) the legal dimensions of conflicts between Native Americans, American settlers, and the United States government; 2) the legal consolidation of the Third Reich in Germany and its impact on Jewish people under its rule; 3) the legal construction of Israel’s military rule over the West Bank and Gaza Strip and the impact of military occupation on the Palestinian population; 4) the transformation of law and consequences of “official” justice within the United States in response to threats to national security; 5) the relationship between law, violence, occupation and the reconstruction of nations within Iraq.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion of readings and videos, student presentations of group research projects.
REQUIREMENTS: Reading, watching videos, open-note exam, writing case briefs and essays, researching and preparing group projects and presenting dramatizations and group projects in class.

POLT 12900-01 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES SS LA 1b G
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller, ext. 4-3508
ENROLLMENT: 60
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: The course will expose participants to critical global challenges such as the protection of human security in a competitive marketplace; questions of sovereignty and state violence; and globalization and its socio-political and economic consequences. It will foster critical thinking and writing skills and provide fundamental analytical frames through which students can address on-going debates on representation, identity, eurocentrism and global histories. We will also seek to facilitate dialogue that engenders global citizenship and contributes to the growth of all participants.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussions, and collaborative work.
REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance, full participation, presentations, tests, essays and project. Open to those who are interested in the subject matter.
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: POLT 12900, ANTH 12900, HPS 12900. 3 credits.

POLT 14100-01 POWER: RACE, SEX AND CLASS SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext. 4-3554
ENROLLMENT: 30
OBJECTIVES: We will deal with the distribution of power in the U.S. according to economic class, sex, and race hierarchies. We discuss what power is, where it comes from, where it is located. This involves the analysis of power in terms of issues of capitalism, globalism, patriarchy, and racism, as well as the specific issues they raise for policy making, persons, the family, and corporate power. The analysis will hopefully help us understand the relations of power defining black working class women, white male workers, white middle class women, etc. The premise of the course is that in order to understand capitalist society one must understand the racialized aspects of sexuality as a form of power, as well as the sexualized aspects of race. Some specific topics discussed are: the present global and national economic crisis; changing aspects of the nation-state; Bush/Cheney’s wars of/on terror; the Gulf Wars 1991-2009; the Chilean 1973 Coup; Obama’s politics of hope; the changing realities of the middle/working class; the global racialized sexual division of labor; the rise of China in the global market; the O.J. Simpson trial, and so on.
STUDENTS: Majors and non-majors alike.
REQUIREMENTS: Students will read a variety of books, and see several films. They write two 7-page analytical papers based on the course readings and films.

POLT 14200-01, 02 IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES SS LA 1a, 1b
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 321, Ext. 4-3581
ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
OBJECTIVES: The course explores the philosophical and ideological roots of political life and political inquiry. Through readings, film, art, music and your own observations, the course focuses on key political ideas and the ideological debates over their meaning and practice. We will examine a range of views on concepts such as liberty, equality, democracy, security, authority, and community. We will consider how these and other political ideas developed historically, why certain ideas endure, and why they remain important to understanding politics today. Ideological perspectives we will explore include liberalism and conservatism (and their “neo” variants), socialism, anarchism, and fascism. The course encourages critical reflection on aspects of political life that we take for granted. Encounters with political theories different from our own subjective views help bring to light our unconscious assumptions and also what is distinctive about our political views.”
FORMAT AND STYLE: lecture and discussion
REQUIREMENTS: active participation, weekly blog, two papers and a final project
GRADING: Based on above requirements

POLT 23000-01 THE HOLOCAUST SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: One social science or humanities course
OBJECTIVES: This course is an introductory survey of major issues related to the Holocaust. We will examine the role of Anti-Semitism in Western Culture and the rise of the racial anti-Semitism that animated Nazi hatred of the Jews. Among the topics to be covered are: The rise of Hitler to power; the initial policies of persecution and dispossession of the Jews and Jewish responses to these policies; the evolution of Nazi policy from expulsion of the Jews to extermination; the role of Jewish community leadership in attempting to cope with a murderous onslaught by establishing Jews in vital industries; the cooperation of many German bureaucrats in the final solution; the relationship of the Holocaust to the Nazi’s overall racial views and their war of racial supremacy in eastern Europe; the ongoing controversy over whether more Jews could have been rescued by the nations opposing Hitler and his regime.

POLT 29900-01 FIELD STUDY
(SEE POLT 40500 INTERNSHIPS FOR FURTHER INFORMATION)
1 TO 6 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: POLT 10100, one other course in the social sciences, and permission of instructor.
OBJECTIVES: Opportunity for students to explore and experience facets of political life through work experience and/or field research. Academic credit contingent upon completion of study design with departmental faculty member. (Course may not be used to satisfy 100-level distribution requirements.)


POLT 31900-01, 02 SELECTED TOPICS IN US POLITICS LA SS
TOPIC: RACE AND US POLITICS
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258
ENROLLMENT: 28 in section 01, 24 in section 02
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences.
OBJECTIVES: Course begins with a short section on the history of racial subjugation and civil rights struggle in the United States. Next, we examine the role of the South's interest in racial subjugation in accounting for the history of party alignments, retarded welfare state development, and decline of the New Deal coalition. We end with an examination of the role of attitudes towards race in accounting for citizen views on affirmative action,
taxation, welfare, and crime.

POLT 33000-01 EUROPEAN POLITICS LA SS
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 24
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: We start with the question of European identity: do we only mean the EU or something more general? Who is included or excluded, and how is this decided? This will lead to a discussion of “European” values. We will address tensions affecting the creation of a new geo-political entity called Europe out of many separate European countries. We consider the structures and selected policies of the European Union. The focus will be on the ideals of such a union, as contrasted with the reality of including different nations with very different policy priorities.
The course will introduce further tools for understanding European politics by looking at some of the key European ideological/political groups that are less familiar in the U.S. (Social Democracy, Christian Democracy, the Greens, post-Communism and the far right). Similarly, the course will look at the ideas and practices behind welfare state policies: education, welfare, immigration, employment policy, and the environment.
Finally, students will examine the political systems of selected European countries, with their distinct sets of actors and policy priorities. The emphasis will be on institutional and policy variations in how each country responds to the same needs or issues, such as economics, civil rights, regional identity, and nationalism. Students will also consider Europe’s interaction with the rest of the world, both at the level of a union and of the individual countries.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion
REQUIREMENTS: Readings, active participation in class, 2 medium papers (7-9 pages), 1 final paper (8-12 pages).

POLT 33200-01 AFRICA THROUGH FILM: IMAGES AND REALITY 1g,h LA SS
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent. 3 credits. (F,Y)
OBJECTIVES: To examine popular representations of the African continent through a study of image and reality and to interrogate the foundation of these constructs. The course emphasizes the need for exposure to counter-narratives in the study of African countries and explores politics, historiographies, resistance, socio-political change, gender and contemporary issues through extensive readings and a comparative analysis of diverse films from Hollywood, radical African filmmakers, and popular African cinema. Students apply sociopolitical analysis to the subject matter, uncovering for instance, apartheid ideology behind the portrayal of Africans in the film "The gods must be crazy."
REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance and active participation, essays/exams. Open to those who fulfill prerequisites and are interested in the subject matter. Participants must have a capacity for extensive reading and writing.

POLT 34005-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE-INTERNATIONAL STUDIES LA SS
TOPIC: POLITICAL VIOLENCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN LATIN AMERICA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITE: None
OBJECTIVES: This course examines the origins, evolution, and outcomes of political violence and conflict in Latin America and in other parts of the world (comparative perspective). Students can expect to develop their critical analytical skills to examine key readings and contemporary analyses on violence and socio-political struggles. We will explore questions such as: what is political violence and is it inevitable? What is the politics behind armed insurrection, and state repression? What leads to groups resorting to human rights violations, torture, disappearances? What effects does it have on societal groups, and is there redress? How has justice been addressed at the national, regional, and international level? How can we improve these methods?
FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion, lecture
GRADING: readings, discussions, research paper

POLT 34200-01 LIBERALISM AND MARXISM SS LA
TOPIC: THEORIZING CAPITALISM, SLAVERY, AND PATRIARCHY
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext 4-3554
ENROLLMENT: 25
OBJECTIVES: This course intends to open students to thinking theoretically and within historical contexts in order for you to develop your own questions about the viability of politics. I provide contemporary examples for the historical dilemmas posed in these classics. We will dialogue with the past through the present. We examine and query the relationship between liberalism and Marxism in terms of sexual, racial, and economic class hierarchies. The course deals with the capitalist division of labor and its relation to the racist and patriarchal sexual division of labor in slavery. The theorists studied are: John Locke, JJ Rousseau, Karl Marx, JS Mill, Sri Aurobindo, Rosa Luxemburg, and Maria Stewart. Our study looks to significant conflicts between Marxism and liberalism with in their theories of private property and individuality. And, we look to the similarities within these theories on masculinist privilege and slave-trade relations. Constructs of nature, natural, democracy, civilization, rationality, inclusivity, and humanity are explored.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures and class discussion of the readings
REQUIREMENTS: Serious commitment to the readings and to your own creativity. There are two 8-page analytically developed papers based on the course readings.

POLT 37000-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN PUBLIC POLICY SS LA
TOPIC: POLITICS OF WEALTH AND POVERTY
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249.
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: The course will focus on the politics of wealth and poverty. After an extensive consideration of various policy approaches to the global economy, the course will focus on domestic problems. Among the topics to be covered are economic inequality, the attack on America’s modest welfare state, the working poor, and welfare reform.
STUDENTS: Open to all interested student who meet the prerequisites.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
REQUIREMENTS: 5-6 books, in-class midterm and final exam, research paper on a policy issue.
GRADING: Standard.

POLT 40100-01 SEMINAR: COMPARITIVE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES SS LA
TOPIC: COMPARATIVE WELFARE STATES
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: Students will first become familiar with the major types of welfare state, examining the philosophies and the policies of each one. We will then study the current crises facing different types of welfare programs (education, health care, retirement, unemployment benefits, etc.), looking at how demographic pressures and the resulting costs affect the systems in selected countries. The class will compare and evaluate various reform options and experiments. Throughout the semester we will refer to political events and trends that affect and are influenced by the welfare debate. Examples will be drawn primarily from OECD countries, but we will also “visit” some less developed countries for comparison.
FORMAT AND STYLE: The course will be like a workshop in which we work independently toward the common goal of better understanding modern welfare states.
REQUIREMENTS: Assignments will include active participation in discussion of a common core of readings, a written literature review on the research topic of your choice, class presentations of readings, and a 25-30-page term paper.

POLT 40101-01 SEMINAR: COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES SS LA
TOPIC: MILITARIZATION OF EVERYDAY LIFE
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3581
ENROLLMENT: 15
OBJECTIVES: From fashion trends, Hollywood films and video games, to military recruitment in public schools, privatization of the military and the politics of siting US bases overseas, this course examines the ways in which people and social relations become objects of militarization. We will pay particular attention to how and why this is embraced by some and resisted by others. The course takes a broad view of militarization as an everyday, “peacetime” process in order to better understand our relationship to state power as individuals, as citizens, and as members of local and global communities. The course begins by looking at some of the central ways American culture and institutions are militarized. We then broaden our scope to explore how these taken-for-granted processes intersect with the militarization of social, political and economic relations globally. Through readings, films and your own experiences, we will critically examine the processes that give rise to and sustain militarization--and the ways in which we are all complicit in the militarization of everyday life.
FORMAT AND STYLE: seminar/discussion
REQUIREMENTS: active participation, weekly blog, two papers and a final project
GRADING: Based on above requirements

POLT 40102-01 SEMINAR: COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES SS LA
TOPIC: Missionaries for Democracy
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITE: Permission of instructor; and 3 courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: Why and how does the US try to spread democracy around the world? We’ll address this question through comparing democracy promotion to traditional religious missionary work, considering the similarities
and differences between the two. We’ll explore the definitions of democracy, whether democracy “travels” across cultures, the relationship of democracy promoters to target societies, and think about whether and how democracy promotion is similar to missionary work.
STUDENTS: Open to interested students who meet prerequisites
FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion

POLT 40300-01 TUTORIAL SS LA
TOPIC: NATIONAL DISASTERS: THE SOCIO-POLITICAL AFTERMATH
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, ext. 4-3508
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: A comparative exploration of the socio-political impact of major national disasters including: “natural” disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami; technological and human error tragedies, for instance, the Nigeria military depot explosions and the Bhopal disaster in India; and terrorist assaults in Kenya and New York. In the wake of such national tragedies, critical fissures and discourses often emerge as societies seek to make sense of the tragedies. The aftermath of disasters is a propitious time to investigate underlying tensions, grievances, and divides in a polity. We will be analyzing patterns of political dissimulation, media coverage, discourses of identity, race, class, gender, religion, emergent forms of ‘othering’ and modes of ‘remembering’ that emerge in the search for resolution, justice and reconstitution of the society. Through a practicum module, participants will also seek to acquire skills in disaster response training.
FORMAT: Research, Discussion, Practicum
STUDENTS: Open only to those who fulfill prerequisites and are interested in the subject matter. Participants must enjoy and have a strong capacity for independent and collaborative research and writing.
REQUIREMENTS: Active participation, research & field work, projects, presentations & essays.
GRADING: Based on fulfillment of above requirements.

POLT 40400-01 TUTORIAL SS LA
TOPIC: The Gay-Military Question Revisited
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent; permission of instructor
OBJECTIVES: To re-examine the “Gays in the military” issue sixteen years following the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, Don’t Pursue” policy initiated by President Clinton in 1993. This reconsideration will take place in the context of 1) changing public opinion, 2) changing military needs, and 3) the changed political landscape of 2009 and the Obama administration. This tutorial will employ the latest general scholarship on gay politics and gay history, and will connect it with contemporary research on the changing face of war—within the United States and beyond.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Intensive discussion once each week
REQUIREMENTS: Six to ten books; two extensive papers
GRADING: Standard, rewrites welcomed

 

POLT 40500-01 INTERNSHIPS NLAVARIABLE CREDIT 

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields. Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs. Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas. Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements. Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

STUDENTS: Interested students should see Tom Shevory, Muller 315, to register for an internship.

REQUIREMENTS: Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work. Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing

 

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