Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses Spring 2007

Dept of Politics, Course Schedule and Descriptions, Spring 2007

Course Schedule

U.S. Politics - 40442 - POLT 10100 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 OR 3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)

U.S. Politics - 40443 - POLT 10100 - 02

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 OR 3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)

U.S. Politics - 40444 - POLT 10100 - 03

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 OR 3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Alexander C. Moon (P)

U.S. Politics - 40445 - POLT 10100 - 04

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 OR 3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Alexander C. Moon (P)


1

Students registering for POLT 10200 MUST register for section 01 LEC and one of the other LEC sections 02-07.
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L Brownstein (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm TR Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Martin L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 43204 - POLT 10200 - 02

Students registering for this section of POLT 10200 MUST also register for section 01 LEC.
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L Brownstein (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm M Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Martin L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 43207 - POLT 10200 - 03

Students registering for this section of POLT 10200 MUST also register for section 01 LEC.
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L Brownstein (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm W Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Martin L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 43209 - POLT 10200 - 04

Students registering for this section of POLT 10200 MUST also register for section 01 LEC.
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L Brownstein (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm F Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Martin L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 43211 - POLT 10200 - 05

Students registering for this section of POLT 10200 MUST also register for section 01 LEC.
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L Brownstein (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm M Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Martin L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 43212 - POLT 10200 - 06

Students registering for this section of POLT 10200 MUST also register for section 01 LEC.
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L Brownstein (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm W Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Martin L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 43213 - POLT 10200 - 07

Students registering for this section of POLT 10200 MUST also register for section 01 LEC.
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L Brownstein (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm R Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Martin L. Brownstein (P)



Introduction to International Relations - 40463 - POLT 12800 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Tomas Larsson (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 11:00 am - 11:50 am MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Tomas Larsson (P)  

Introduction to International Relations - 40466 - POLT 12800 - 02

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Tomas Larsson (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 12:00 pm - 12:50 pm MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Tomas Larsson (P)  



Introduction to Global Studies - 40467 - POLT 12900 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Peyi S Soyinka-Airewele (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm TR Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P)



Ideas and Ideologies - 40470 - POLT 14200 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Charles R Venator Santiago (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm MW Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Charles R. Venator Santiago (P)

Ideas and Ideologies - 40471 - POLT 14200 - 02

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Charles R Venator Santiago (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 5:25 pm - 6:40 pm MW Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Charles R. Venator Santiago (P)



Afghanistan - 43215 - POLT 20221 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Global Perspective, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts
Instructors: Naeem Inayatullah (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm TR Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Naeem Inayatullah (P)



Field Study: Politics - 40525 - POLT 29900 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Non-Liberal Arts

Ithaca Campus
Fieldwork Schedule Type
Fieldwork Instructional Method
1.000 TO 6.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry



Legislative Behavior - 43216 - POLT 30100 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L Brownstein (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:35 pm - 3:50 pm TR Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Martin L. Brownstein (P)



Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties - 43217 - POLT 30300 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 9:00 am - 9:50 am MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Beth E. Harris (P)



Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties - 43219 - POLT 30300 - 02

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 10:00 am - 10:50 am MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Beth E. Harris (P)



U.S. Party Politics - 43220 - POLT 30400 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 5:15 pm TR Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Donald W. Beachler (P)



European Politics - 40551 - POLT 33000 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Juan M. Arroyo (P)



ST: Politics Understand Islam: - 43356 - POLT 34002 - 01

Understanding Islam: Religion and Politics
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Asma Barlas (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:10 pm - 2:25 pm TR Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Asma Barlas (P)



Seeing War of the Worlds - 43358 - POLT 34006 - 01

Seeing War of the Worlds: Global Politics thru Pop. Films
Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Naeem Inayatullah (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 6:50 pm - 8:05 pm T Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Naeem Inayatullah (P) Class 10:50 am - 12:05 pm R Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Naeem Inayatullah (P)



ST: Politics of Memory - 43360 - POLT 34007 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Peyi S Soyinka-Airewele (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 1:10 pm - 2:25 pm TR Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P)

Selected Topics in Political Theory - 43222 - POLT 35000 - 01
CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm MWF Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Alexander C. Moon (P)


Environmental Politics - 40555 - POLT 36600 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Thomas C Shevory (P)

Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 2:35 pm - 3:50 pm TR Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Lecture Thomas C. Shevory (P)



The Holocaust - 40557 - POLT 40100 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)

Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm W Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Seminar Donald W. Beachler (P)


Haitian Unification Debates - 40558 - POLT 40100 - 02

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Charles R Venator Santiago (P)

Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 6:50 pm - 9:20 pm M Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Seminar Charles R. Venator Santiago (P)


Witnessing Injustice - 43223 - POLT 40100 - 03

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)

Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 6:50 pm - 9:20 pm T Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Seminar Beth E. Harris (P)



Politics of Prisons - 40559 - POLT 40200 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)

Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type Instructors Class 6:50 pm - 9:20 pm T Jan 22, 2007 - May 11, 2007 Seminar Alexander C. Moon (P)



Welfare States - 40560 - POLT 40300 - 01

Associated Term: Spring 2007
Registration Dates: Nov 06, 2006 to May 11, 2007
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)

Ithaca Campus
Tutorial Schedule Type
Tutorial Instructional Method
1.000 TO 4.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry

Scheduled Meeting Times Type Time Days Schedule Type

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Course Descriptions, Politics Dept, Spring 2007

The curriculum is designed to give students an understanding of political organization and political forces in modern society, to provide knowledge and a basis for insight and judgment on the problems involved in the relationship of the individual to government and of governments to one another.  Students are prepared for the intelligent performance of the functions of citizenship, for careers in public service, foreign relations, teaching at the secondary level, the study of law and for study at the graduate level.

 

POLT 10100-01, 02      U.S. POLITICS       SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 312, Ext. 4-3969

ENROLLMENT: 25 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES:  Institutions, processes, and cultural roots of U.S. politics.   Complex interrelationships among a highly specific set of political-economic institutions which have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society; Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process.  Analysis of specific policies, such as social security, abortion, the drinking age, health care, taxes, etc.

STUDENTS:  Open to all students.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Discussion/lecture.

POLT 10100-03, 04      U.S. POLITICS      SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258
ENROLLMENT:  25 per section
PREREQUISITES:  None
OBJECTIVES. This course has three main purposes.  In ascending order of importance, it seeks to familiarize students with the role of voters, interest groups, the media and parties in the American political system.  We will examine the dynamics of American political institutions and (some of) the origins of (some of) the current political cleavages in the U.S.; it will examine the gap between the ideals and practices of American politics.
FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lecture/discussion

 

POLT 10200-01  and 02-07     MEDIA AND POLITICS      SS LA

You must enroll in Section 01 (Lecture) as well as one discussion section (02-07)

3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:  Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 43544.
ENROLLMENT:  Lecture of 90 with 6 discussion sections of 15 students each
PREREQUISITE:  None
OBJECTIVES:  1. To understand the symbiotic, mutually reinforcing nature of the relationship of governmental institutions and institutions of mass media.  2. To explore the myth of the adversary relationship between the press and the public order.  3. To see how issues of public policy are presented to mass audiences in terms of symbolic valence.  4. To comprehend the ways in which elections are influenced by media.  5. To explain the salient differences in method of news presentation by alternative media sources; to see how differing methods produce different outlooks. 6. To learn how governmental regulation of electronic media is qualitatively different from the forms of regulation imposed on print media; to understand the results of that difference.  7. To identify alternative forms of governmental regulation of public media in other nations.  8. To assess the relevance of this course material for the future of American democracy, for future prospects for citizen participation in public life, and for personal development; to ask "So What?"  9. To understand that political disputation and argument are integral to political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse, to know that everybody is biased, and properly so.  10. To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding--and great fun!
STUDENTS:  Students from all disciplines at Ithaca College are encouraged to take this course.  Students from Communications are especially welcomed, as are students from Business and all Humanities and Sciences departments.  Seniors, juniors, sophomores and first-year students are all invited to apply for this course.  NOTE: This course does not meet any specific Politics Department distributional requirements.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Two lectures, and one discussion class per week, and student involvement is actively sought. This course will make extensive use of films and other video materials.

REQUIREMENTS:  Course requirements include approximately five books, the daily reading of The New York Times, attention to at least one weekly periodical magazine of political opinion, and at least one daily television news program.  Three take-home papers are required, and these may be rewritten so that students may be afforded the chance to learn from their errors.  Most fundamentally, students are expected to bring interest and enthusiasm into this course.

GRADING:  Traditional A, B, C, D, F grading will be used.

 

POLT 12800-01, 02   INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS   SS LA 1b, g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Tomas Larsson, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT:  28 per section

PREREQUISITES:  None

OBJECTIVES:  Introduces students to basic perspectives and events in world politics (international relations). Different theoretical positions (realism, liberalism, constructivism, Marxism, and feminism) and methodological approaches are examined critically. The central purpose of the course is to provide the beginning student of international relations with the analytic tools necessary to understand contemporary events and to undertake advanced study in these areas. Substantive issues covered in the course include war, terrorism, economic globalization, and foreign policy.

 

POLT 12900-01      INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES      SS LA 1b g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller

ENROLLMENT: 60

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: 1) To expose participants to critical global challenges such as the protection of human rights in a competitive marketplace and the resolution of conflicts emanating from issues such as identity politics, weapons proliferation, the use of natural resources and the globalization of capitalist production.  2) To provide fundamental analytical frames through which students can address the on-going debates on culture, global histories and the moral use of power. 3) To foster dialogue that will contribute to the personal growth of all participants.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussions, and collaborative work.

STUDENTS: Open to all interested students

REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance, full participation, presentations, tests, essays and project.

GRADING: Based on above requirements.

 

POLT 14100-01     POWER: RACE, SEX AND CLASS     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext. 4-3554

ENROLLMENT:25

OBJECTIVES:We will deal with the distribution of power in the U.S. according to economic class, sex, and race hierarchies.  We discuss what power is, where it comes from, where it is located.  This involves the analysis of power in terms of issues of capitalism, globalism, patriarchy, and racism, as well as the specific issues they raise for policy making, persons, the family, and corporate power.  The analysis will hopefully help us understand the relations of power defining black working class women, white male workers, white middle class women, etc.  The premise of the course is that in order to understand capitalist society one must understand the racialized aspects of sexuality as a form of power, as well as the sexualized aspects of race.  Some specific topics discussed are: the changing aspects of the nation-state; Reagan/Clinton/Bush political discourses; the Gulf Wars 1991-2007; the Chilean 1973 Coup; the changing realities of the middle/working class; the global racialized sexual division of labor; the O.J. Simpson trial, and so on.

STUDENTS:Majors and non-majors alike.

REQUIREMENTS:Students will read a variety of books, write two 7-page analytical papers.

 

POLT 14200-01, 02      IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES      SS LA 1a, 1b

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Charles R. Venator Santiago, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

OBJECTIVES:  Exploration of the philosophical and ideological roots of political life and political inquiry.  The course will address notions such as social responsibility, civil disobedience, conscientious objection, the French Revolution, Marxism, Fascism, Nazism, cultural politics, Western Liberalism, conservatism, international law and justice, human rights, patriotism, nationalism, homeland security, and identity and violence.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Two lectures M-W

GRADING: Students are expected to write five short papers, to complete a journal, and to actively participate in class.

 

POLT 29900-01   FIELD STUDY

(SEE POLT 40500 INTERNSHIPS FOR FURTHER INFORMATION)

1 TO 6 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  5

PREREQUISITES:  POLT 10100, one other course in the social sciences, and permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES:  Opportunity for students to explore and experience facets of political life through work experience and/or field research.  Academic credit contingent upon completion of study design with departmental faculty member.  (Course may not be used to satisfy 100-level distribution requirements.)

 

POLT 30100-01  LEGISLATIVE BEHAVIOR        SS LA  

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544.

ENROLLMENT:  28

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  1. To understand those political structures that are common in legislative decisional bodies.  2. To comprehend those institutional structures which are unique to the United States Congress.  3. To learn about the processes and social interactions most crucial to the functioning of the Congress.  4. To examine executive-legislative conflicts within comparative perspective, both intra-American and international.  5. To evaluate some prominent suggestions for Congressional reform; to place the whole question of institutional change.  6. To generate a sensitive understanding of the social and psychological dynamics of legislators, both within the formal legislative arena and between legislators and constituents.  7. To develop one or more in-class legislative gaming models to aid in comprehending the social dynamics of collegial decision-making bodies; to begin a conceptualize a general theory of collegiality.  8. To simulate a model of the U.S. Senate.  9. To understand that political disputation and argument are integral to political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse; to know that everybody is biased, and properly so.  10. To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding--and great fun.

STUDENTS:  Politics majors of upper-class status; other social science majors (history, sociology, economics, etc.):  communications majors, business majors.  This is a course for students with sophomore status or beyond.  This course is a particularly useful one to take for students who are contemplating field work or internship in Washington, D.C. during the summer of 2006.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Two classes per week with the class tending more towards the discussion mode than the lecture mode.  A major part of this course will involve an extended legislative simulation or game, with each student role-playing a specific U.S. Senator throughout the semester.

REQUIREMENTS:  1. A genuine interest in politics, or a genuine desire to learn.  2. Regular attendance at classes.  3. Careful reading of all course materials, to be completed by the dates assigned.  4. Daily reading of The New York Times.  5. Four papers. 6. Participation in an extended game model of the U.S. Senate.

GRADING:  Standard A, B, C, D, and F grades will be used.

 

POLT 30300-01, 02  CONSTITUTIONAL LAW:  CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES:   SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext:  4-3517

ENROLLMENT:  27 per section

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  Throughout this course we will attempt to come to terms with the content, character and role of constitutional norms in modern America.  Our studies typically will begin with significant Supreme Court decisions, but we also will examine the broader political and social conflicts, debates and cultural practices involving the basic rights.  We will give attention to the role of race, class, gender, and citizenship in the scope of the judicial protection of rights.  Our inquiry will focus on two general categories of constitutionally authorized civil liberties:  1) the right of suspected criminals to due process, and 2) the rights to belief, expression, religion, and association.

STUDENTS:  Primarily politics and legal studies majors, but open to all who meet prerequisites.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Students will discuss significant Supreme Court decisions and supplementary readings.  Students will develop and present group projects that explore legal debates and analyze the significance of constitutional doctrine in political conflicts.  Students must be willing to prepare for class by briefing cases, participate in class discussions, and work in groups outside of the class period to prepare group projects. 

REQUIREMENTS:  Texts will include a casebook of Supreme Court opinions, a text concerning judicial review of anti-terrorism policies, and A Promise of Justice, by David Protess and Rob Warden.

GRADING:  Grades will be based on open-note exams, essays, and in-class presentations.

 

POLT 30400-01  PARTY POLITICS    LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Mueller 333, ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  28

PREREQUISITE:  Three courses in the social sciences

OBJECTIVE:  To cover several important themes in American party politics.  The dynamics of presidential and congressional elections are explored.  The role of money in politics will be considered.  We will also cover the impact of the electoral college and the single member plurality electoral system.  Considerable attention will be devoted to the development of the party system from the 1930s to the present.  The thesis that elections play a decreasing role in American politics is investigated.  We will follow the 2004 presidential election closely, though this is not a primarily a current events class.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Lecture and discussion

REQUIREMENTS:  Two exams, two short papers

GRADING:  Letter grades

 

POLT 33000-01    EUROPEAN POLITICS    

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969

ENROLLMENT:  25

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  We start with the question of European identity: do we only mean the EU or something more general? Who is included or excluded, and how is this decided? Can one identify specifically European values? We will address tensions affecting the creation of a new geo-political entity called ?Europe? out of many separate European countries. We consider the mechanisms and values of the European Union. The focus will be on the ideals of such a union, as contrasted with the reality of including different nations with very different policy priorities. The course provides further background by looking at some of the key European  ideological/political variations that are less familiar in the U.S. (social democracy, Christian democracy, post-communism and the far right). Students will examine the political systems of selected European countries, with their distinct sets of actors and policy priorities. The emphasis will be on institutional and policy variations in how each country responds to the same needs or issues, such as economics, civil rights, immigration, regional identity, and nationalism. Students will also consider Europe's interaction with the rest of the world, both at the level of a union and of the individual countries.

 

POLT 34002-01 SELECTED TOPICS:  UNDERSTANDING THE POLITICS AND RELIGION OF ISLAM

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Asma Barlas, CHS 101, Ext. 4-3557

OBJECTIVES:  Today, Islam is known only by the worst excesses of some of its adherents; this course enables a constructive engagement with the religion, both as a system of ideas and as an historically and politically lived reality.  We will examine the basic teachings of Islam with respect to God, human creation, moral individuality, gender relationships, and war and peace. We also will study aspects of Muslim history and politics. Texts consist of selections from the scripture as well as works of theology, philosophy, Sufism (the mystical tradition), and politics

Texts: Asma Barlas, ?Believing Women? in Islam. Khalid Abou El Fadl, The Place of Tolerance in Islam. Carl Ernst, Following Muhammad; Mahmood Mamdani, Good Muslim, Bad MuslimJalal al-din Rumi, TheLove Poems of Rumi. and others.

REQUIRMENTS:discussion based class with concept papers and journal entries.

 

POLT 34006-01      SELECTED TOPICS:  CONTEMPORARY WAR AND FILM

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Naeem Inayatullah, Muller 325, Ext. 4-3028.

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITE: willingness to accept alternative teaching methods.

OBJECTIVES:  Relative to the Vietnam era, there seem to be few war images on our screens.  Curiously, the relative absence of real war imagery in our news is accompanied by an abundance of fictional war imagery in our films.  Films such as ?War of the Worlds,? ?Manchurian Candidate,? and ?Three Kings? depict the material and psychological horror of war with great acuity.  Could it be that the real news images that our culture conceals and represses nevertheless re-appear as fiction and film?  What is the relationship between the artificial images presented by these films and the political reality of our times?  How do ?fictional? and ?real? worlds influence each other?  How does the interaction of aesthetics and politics shape our understanding of the contemporary world?

STUDENTS: Plenty of viewing, reading, writing, and discussion

 

POLT 34007-01       SELECTED TOPICS:  POLITICS OF MEMORY      SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences. 

OBJECTIVES:  Exploration of the political and social dilemmas surrounding concepts such as collective memory, truth, justice, confession, forgiveness, healing and reconciliation in socio-political spaces. How, for instance, will the political suppression or mobilization of memory vie for space with efforts to address the systematization of unconscionable crimes against humanity and create a just peace? What lessons do the experiences of South Africa, the USA, Chile, and Rwanda offer other polarized societies? Students engage memory theory and the narratives of victims and perpetrators in examining Czech writer Milan Kundera?s suggestion that ?the struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.?

 

POLT 35000-01     SELECTED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY     SS LA TOPIC:  CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORY

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Alex Moon, 308 Muller Faculty Center, ext. 4-1258

ENROLLMENT:  25

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  This course will examine the current controversies between liberalism, communitarianism, critical theory, and post-modernism on the nature and foundations of moral knowledge and political authority.  The central question of the course will be the possibility of constructing a just political order including people with different moral, philosophical, and religious views.  How can conflicts over issues such as prayer in schools, abortion, welfare, and gay marriage be resolved given the fundamentally different views people have about the meaning of life, sources of moral knowledge and human nature? 

STUDENTS:  Majors and non-majors; some background in political theory or philosophy required.

REQUIREMENTS:  Two eight-page papers.  

POLT 36600-01     ENVIRONMENTAL POLTICS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Tom Shevory, 315 Muller Faculty Center, 4-1347

ENROLLMENT:  30

OBJECTIVES:  This course will be organized in relation to themes established as part of the Tenth Annual Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival.  The Festival?s four themes are:  Metropoli, Panic Attacks, Maps and Memes, and Soundscapes.  Course readings and class writing assignments will be related to these themes in some way.   Possible texts are: Melissa Checker, Polluted Promises, Jeff Ferrell, Empire of Scrounge, Elizbeth Kolbert, Field Notes from a Catastrophe, Michael Eric Dyson, Come Hell or High Water:  Hurrican Katrina and the Color of Disaster,  Michael Pollan, Omnivore?s Dilemma, Craig Rosebraugh, Burning Rage of a Dying Planet: Speaking for the Earth Liberation Front.

 

During the week of March 30-April 6, Environmental Politics classes will host films and/or speakers associated with the festival.  Students will be expected to attend films and other events outside of class, and these will be analyzed in the context of course readings. 

 

Otherwise, class will consist of reading, lecture, and class discussion.  Four papers on class readings will be required.

 

POLT 40100-01     SEMINAR     SS  LA

TOPIC: POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE HOLOCAUST

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and three courses in social sciences or the equivalent

OBJECTIVES: The seminar will explore portions of the voluminous literature on the Holocaust to extract implications for politics. Among the topics to be considered are the conditions that permit people to participate in genocide and the human capacity for self-deception that enables people to rationalize their actions. This section of the seminar will consider the controversy raised by Daniel Goldhagen?s book Hitler?s Willing Executioners. We will also explore the academic politics of Holocaust studies by reading works that both proclaim the uniqueness of the Holocaust and by considering authors who argue that too much attention has been paid the Holocaust to the neglect of other historical instances of genocide. The ethical lessons that can be gleaned from global indifference to the destruction of the European Jews will form another segment of the seminar. The global response to atrocities in Rwanda and Bosnia will be included for comparative purposes.

STUDENTS: Juniors and Seniors

FORMAT AND STYLE: The seminar will employ a discussion format

REQUIREMENTS: Five to six short papers; read 8- 10 books; regular class attendance and participation

GRADING: Standard

 

POLT 40100-02      SEMINAR    SS LA 1a, 1b TOPIC:  THE HAITIAN UNIFICATION

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Charles R. Venator Santiago, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 15

OBJECTIVES:  This course will explore some of the key institutional debates framing the historical relationship between the Dominican Republic and the Republic of Haiti.  We will begin with a discussion of the border debates dividing the island of Haiti, Bohio, or La Hispaniola and work our way through the Haitian unification debates of the 19th century, the U.S. occupations and their plantation/labor policies, the Massacre of 1937 and subsequent debates regarding migratory politics in the island.  The course will close with a discussion of current Inter-American and Dominican court rulings on the status of Haitians in the Dominican Republic.  Topics discussed in the course will include race/ethnic debates, nationalist ideologies, migrations, and state building.

FORMAT AND STYLE:  One seminar meeting every Monday evening.

GRADING: Students are expected to one major research paper a series of smaller papers.

 

POLT  40100-03     SEMINAR      SS LA

TOPIC:  WITNESSING UNDER OCCUPATION: IRAQ, PALESTINE, LEBANON  3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or equivalent; permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES: This course will explore the role of law in the creation of the administrative infrastructure and legal norms governing the occupations in Iraq, Palestine and Lebanon.  We will also examine various theories of ?witness? and multiple strategies of witness, including litigation, reporting, film-making, religious practices, creation of art and non-violent direct action.  Students will be responsible for serving as witnesses to injustices under occupation in a final project.  Students may work individually or in groups for these projects. 

FORMAT AND STYLE:  Classes will include discussions and student presentations.

REQUIREMENTS:  Students are required to do all assigned readings and independent research, participate in and lead classes, complete a final witnessing project related to Iraq, Palestine or Lebanon, and complete a final 6-8 page paper that evaluates the potential and limits of witnessing as a strategy to challenge injustices under occupation. 

 

POLT  40200-01      SEMINAR       SS LA

TOPIC :  POLITICS OF PRISONS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES:  Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  This tutorial covers the theory and practice of punishment.  We begin with justifications and critiques of the idea of punishment.  In order to evaluate these theories and contemporary practice, we examine historical and current prison conditions.  The last section of the course will deal with the politics of prison construction and its intersection with the politics of race in the United States.

 

POLT  40300-01     TUTORIAL

TOPIC:   COMPARATIVE WELFARE STATES    

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969

ENROLLMENT:  5

PREREQUISITES:  Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: Students will first become familiar with the major types of welfare state, examining the philosophies and the policies of each one. We will then study the current crises facing advanced welfare systems, looking at how demographic pressures and the resulting costs affect the different systems. Then we will compare various reform options and experiments. Throughout the semester we will refer to political events and trends that affect and are influenced by the welfare debate. Examples will be drawn primarily from OECD countries, but we will also ?visit? some less developed countries for comparison. The course will be like a workshop in which we work independently toward the common goal of better understanding modern welfare states. Assignments will include active participation in discussion of common core of readings, a written literature review on the research topic of your choice, class presentations of readings, and a 30-page term paper.

 

POLT 40300-02     TUTORIAL      SS LA

TOPIC:  NATIONAL DISASTERS: THE SOCIO-POLITICAL AFTERMATH

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  A comparative exploration of the socio-political impact of diverse categories of national disasters that have attracted global attention including: ?natural? disasters such as Hurricane Katrina, the Tangshan earthquake, the Tsunami and Mt Pinatubo Volcanic eruption; technological and human error tragedies, for instance, the Nigeria military depot explosions and the Chernobyl nuclear explosions; as well as terrorist assaults in Kenya, London, New York, Sudan, Morocco and Madrid. In the wake of such national tragedies, critical fissures and discourses often emerge as societies seek to make sense of the disasters, and to respond to the tragedy, its victims and survivors. The aftermath of disasters is a propitious time to investigate underlying tensions, grievances, and divides in a polity.  We will be analyzing patterns of political dissimulation, media coverage, discourses of identity, race, class, gender, religion and local and global ?othering? in explanations for and responses to the tragedy. In addition, we shall explore the role of collective memory, political and social culture in the search for resolution and reconstitution of the society. Through collaborative research, we will seek to unearth the key variables that determine how societies address such disasters and to acquire new skills through disaster response training.

FORMAT: Research, Discussion, Practicum

STUDENTS: Open only to those who fulfill prerequisites and are interested in the subject matter. Participants must enjoy and have a strong capacity for independent and collaborative research and writing.

REQUIREMENTS: Active participation, research & field work, projects, presentations & essays.

GRADING: Based on fulfillment of above requirements.

 

POLT 40500-01  INTERNSHIPS  NLA

VARIABLE CREDIT

INSTRUCTOR:  Don Bleachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  10.

PREREQUISITES:  Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES:  The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields.  Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs.  Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas.  Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements.  Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

STUDENTS:  Interested students should see Tom Shevory, Muller 315, to register for an internship.

REQUIREMENTS:  Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work.  Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.

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