Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses Fall 2012

 Politics Department

All Politics Department courses are open to all students who meet the prerequisites. For information on requirements for a Politics major or minor, please see Chip Gagnon, Politics Department, 324 Muller Faculty Center.

Course schedule: /hs/depts/politics/docs/schedules/f12schedule.pdf

POLT 10100-01, 02 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1 h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Institutions, processes, and cultural/ideological roots of U.S. politics. We begin by studying a framework of ideologies that will help us to understand the political-

economic institutions that have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society: Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process. Throughout, we will constantly ask: how democratic is this place? What are your criteria for measuring democracy? Students will be invited to consider how money affects the ability of citizens to influence the political process. Analysis of specific policies may include social security, abortion, health care, taxes, civil liberties, foreign policy, etc.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, active participation in class discussions, 2-3 short papers (3-5 pages), 1 medium paper (5-7 pages), 1 final paper (7-10 pages)

 

 

POLT 10100-03 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1 h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258

ENROLLMENT: 90

PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course has three main purposes. In ascending order of importance, it seeks to familiarize students with the role of voters, interest groups, the media, and parties in the American political system. We will examine the dynamics of American political institutions and (some of) the origins of (some of) the current political cleavages in the U.S.; it will

examine the gap between the ideals and practices of American politics.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion

 

 

POLT 10100-04, 05 U.S. POLITICS LA SS 1 h
3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Adnan Selimović
ENROLLMENT: 25 
PREREQUISITES: None
STUDENTS: Open to all students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this introductory course we will explore the many facets that regularly fall under the heading of American politics. In an effort to give students new to studies of politics a useful grounding, we will study American politics as it has developed since the era of the “cultural wars” during the 1960s. Our course of study will attend to American political culture of the 1970s, the 1980s, and the 1990s. Our primary objective will be to gain a general yet critical understanding of American political lay of the land in ways that demystify its processes and confront the implications of its limitations and internal contradictions. Invariably we will explore the nature of its institutional structures. But, our more global concern will be to inquire into the forces and dynamics that have conditioned those political structures.

 

The hope is that this course will allow its participants to make sense of the contemporary political world. Some of the topics that will come up during our course are: rhetorics of inclusion/exclusion, American political economy and ideology, the legacy of the military-industrial complex, think-tanks, interest groups, power blocs, elitism, populism, radicalism, conservatives and liberals, the impact of industrial and financial capitalism, and so on. The course will move along with an eclectic collection of readings, which are meant to intrigue as much as give students a taste of the diversity of perspectives on the main themes of American political culture.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Regular attendance, readings and films, active participation in class discussions, a few small reflection papers, and two 5-page papers.

 

 

 

POLT 12200-01, 02 POLITICS AND SOCIETY SS LA

credits 3

INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714
ENROLLMENT: 27
PREREQUISITES: none
STUDENTS: open
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course in comparative and international politics that explores the impact of social forces and societal dynamics on the politics of diverse countries, as well as the influence of politics and the state on society. Students will be learning and analyzing past and current world events of political relevance in today’s world but that do not get well captured in mainstream media, such as what meaning does democracy have for different actors, why/when democracies emerge and breakdown and with what effects on different societal groups, why is state power wielded in repressive manners across different political systems, what problems emerge when international actors play attempt conflict resolution and governance-related reconstruction, and what impact do citizens’ struggles and activism have on creating democratic and economic change within countries affected by poverty and/or conflict? Students will understand the history, and political processes and events in a variety of countries including Chile, Venezuela, North and South Sudan, North Korea, Egypt, and others.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture and discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: papers, exams, group discussion, participation

 

 

POLT 12300-01, 02 POLITICAL JUSTICE SS LA 1 g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: We examine the relationships between collective identities, law, politics, power, witnessing, and justice in comparative contexts. The readings and films draw on a number of disciplinary and professional approaches, including law, the social sciences, the humanities, and journalism. We use case studies to analyze conflicts between nation building/national security strategies and those social and politics groups whose civil liberties are threatened by official legal and political strategies. This course is included within the interdisciplinary, transnational Classrooms Beyond Borders project. Through the use of digital technologies, students will share and discuss several readings with students at An Najah University in the West Bank. The case studies may explore: 1) the legal dimensions of conflicts between Native Americans, American settlers, and the United States government; 2) the legal consolidation of the Third Reich in Germany and its impact on Jewish people under its rule; 3) the legal construction of Israel’s military rule over the West Bank and Gaza Strip and the impact of military occupation on the Palestinian population; 4) Legal and cultural strategies of resistance to racial injustices in the United States; and 4) recent transformations of law and “official” norms of justice within the United States.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion of readings and videos, video conferences, student presentations of group research projects; and blog communications beyond classroom borders.

REQUIREMENTS: Reading, watching videos, open-note exam, writing case briefs and essays, maintaining blogs with commentaries related to course curriculum; researching and preparing group projects, and presenting group projects in class.

 

POLT 12800-01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 1 G LA SS

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Lisa Sansoucy, 122 Administrative Annex, Ext. 4-7040

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: None

STUDENTS: Open to all students

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces students to basic perspectives and events in world politics (international relations). Different theoretical positions are examined critically. The central purpose of the course is to provide the beginning student of international relations/world politics with the analytic tools necessary to understand contemporary events and to undertake advanced study in these areas. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, active participation in class discussions.

 

 

POLT 12900-01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES SS LA 1 G

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller, ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT: 30

PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will expose participants to critical global challenges such as the protection of human security in a competitive marketplace; questions of sovereignty and state violence; and globalization and its socio-political and economic consequences. It will foster critical thinking and

writing skills and provide fundamental analytical frames through which students can address on-going debates on representation, identity, eurocentrism and global histories. We will also seek to facilitate dialogue that engenders global citizenship and contributes to the growth of all participants.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussions, and collaborative work.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Regular attendance, full participation, presentations, tests, essays and projects. Open to those who are interested in the subject matter. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: POLT 12900, ANTH 12900, HPS 12900.

 

 

POLT 14200-01, 02 IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES SS LA 1

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 323, Ext. 4-3581

ENROLLMENT: 30

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course explores the ideological roots of political life and political inquiry. Through readings, film, art, music and your own observations, the course focuses on key political ideas and the ideological debates over their meaning and practice. We will examine a range of views on concepts such as liberty, equality, democracy, rationality, security, order, authority, community and nation. We will consider how these and other political ideas developed historically, why certain ideas endure, and why they remain important to understanding politics today. In doing so we will also pay close attention to how political ideas intertwine with constructions of class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. All of this involves critical reflection on where our own views about the world come from, and on aspects of political life that we take for granted. Encounters with political theories different from our own subjective views help bring to light our unconscious assumptions and also what is distinctive about our political views. Ideological perspectives the course explores include liberalism and conservatism (and their “neo” variants), socialism, anarchism, and fascism.

COURSE FORMAT AND STYLE: lecture and discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: active participation, weekly blog contributions and a semester-long final project. Grading based on above requirements.

 

 

 

POLT 22003-01 HNRS SEM: THE POLITICS OF THE WIRE LA SS 1

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Thomas Shevory

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: Enrollment in the honors program

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will view the first season of the HBO series, The Wire and will engage reading materials related to the social, political, and economic issues raised by show. Topics include, the politics of language, economics of the drug trade, institutional hierarchies of drug gangs and police departments, poverty issues, public housing policy, and race/gender politics. Some attention will also be given to media theory.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture/screenings

COURSE REQUIRMENTS AND GRADING: Three take-home exams; A-F.

 

 

POLT 23000-01 THE HOLOCAUST SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: David Furber

ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: One social science or humanities course
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introductory survey of major issues related to the Holocaust. We will examine the role of Anti-Semitism in Western Culture and the rise of the racial anti-Semitism that animated Nazi hatred of the Jews. Among the topics to be covered are: The rise of Hitler to power; the initial policies of persecution and dispossession of the Jews and Jewish responses to these policies; the evolution of Nazi policy from expulsion of the Jews to extermination; the role of Jewish community leadership in attempting to cope with a murderous onslaught by establishing Jews in vital industries; the cooperation of many German bureaucrats in the final solution; the relationship of the Holocaust to the Nazi’s overall racial views and their war of racial supremacy in eastern Europe; the ongoing controversy over whether more Jews could have been rescued by the nations opposing Hitler and his regime.

 

POLT 31900-01 Selected Topics: US Politics in the Long Term SS LA
3 Credits
Instructor: Simon Gilhooley
Enrollment: 28
Course Description: Why are there two parties in America? Why is there no universal healthcare? Why did the Civil Rights Movement happen in the 1950s and 1960s? This course takes up some of these questions by exploring the historical origins and development of contemporary issues in American politics. Taking up a different theme (such as race, welfare, or political parties) each week, the course will discuss the ways in which we can see these areas of politics as the consequence of developments occurring over long periods of time. Exploring the consequences of decisions made in the past, the unintended results of policies, and the development of institutions we shall attempt to understand how American politics has come to be the way that it is, and how and when political change has been effected in the United States.

 

 POLT 32000-01 Selected Topics in US Politics: : The U.S. Constitution as Political Text SS LA

3 Credits
Instructor: Simon Gilhooley
Enrollment: 28
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers a consideration of the United States Constitution as a constitutional document, seeking to consider the origins of the Constitution, the manner in which it has developed, and the influence and importance of it within contemporary America. In place of traditional constitutional law courses that cover the accepted and contested meanings of the law derived from the Constitution, this course would consider the influence that the Constitution has had upon American society. While it would necessarily engage with legal discussions, these interactions would be aimed at exploring the Constitution’s role within American society, not at providing a background in law. Proceeding in three broad parts, the course would initially introduce students to the debates within political thought regarding the nature of the Constitution. A second segment would draw from those actors operating after the Founding, and as such considering the Constitution as an existing institution. A final section would turn to the Constitution as it now exists in contemporary political life. Looking to the first two amendments of the Bill of Rights, the class would consider the way in which the text of the constitutional document shapes notions of free speech and fire-arms regulation within the American polity.  

 

POLT 33000-01 EUROPEAN POLITICS LA SS
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We start with the question of European identity: do we only mean the EU or something more general? Who is included or excluded, and how is this decided? This will lead to a discussion of “European” values. We will address tensions affecting the creation of a new geo-political entity called Europe out of many separate European countries. We briefly consider the structures and selected policies of the European Union. The course will introduce further tools for understanding European politics by looking at some of the key European ideological/political groups that are less familiar in the U.S. (Social Democracy, Christian Democracy, the Greens, post-Communism and the far right). Similarly, the course will look at the ideas and practices behind welfare state policies: education, welfare, immigration, employment policy, and the environment. Finally, students will examine the political systems of selected European countries, with their distinct sets of actors and policy priorities. The emphasis will be on institutional and policy variations in how each country responds to the same needs or issues, such as economics, civil rights, regional identity, and nationalism.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADES: Readings, active participation in class, 2-3 short analysis exercises (3-4 pages), 1 medium paper (5-7 pages), 1 final paper (8-12 pages).

 

 

POLT 33100-01 LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS SS LA

Credits 3

INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, ext 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 26

PREREQUISITES: three courses in social sciences

STUDENTS: open

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course introduces students to issues in contemporary Latin American Politics. It examines the historical experiences, internal political and socio-economic structures, and behaviors of national and international actors influencing Latin American countries’ politics and societies. The course will pay particular attention to discerning similar and diverse patterns and constraints on political and economic development through in-depth focus and comparisons of specific pairs of countries (Colombia and Bolivia; Haiti and Cuba). How do historical power relations within these countries and in the region influence their contemporary political conjunctures? How are indigenous and other social movements drawing on diverse set of tactics that confront the political dominance of elites in these countries, and to what effect? How are new left governments promoting social change in the region, and what challenges are they presenting to US influence in the region? How do the Bolivian and Cuban support for economic/social integrative proposals around ALBA (Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America) compare to free-trade arrangements in Haiti and Colombia? What diverse policy approaches are emerging in areas such as illicit drug production, agriculture, environmental policy, and others? The course will be taught through a combination of lecture, group discussions, speakers and documentary films, with a heavy component of critical comparative analysis of readings.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture and discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: papers, group discussion, participation

 

 

 

POLT 33200-01 AFRICA THROUGH FILM: IMAGES AND REALITY LA SS g h

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314

ENROLLMENT: 30

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

STUDENTS: Open to those who fulfill prerequisites and are interested in the subject matter.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: To examine popular representations of the African continent through a study of image and reality and to interrogate the foundation of these constructs. The course emphasizes the need for exposure to counter-narratives in the study of African countries and explores politics, historiographies, resistance, socio-political change, gender and contemporary issues through extensive readings and a comparative analysis of diverse films from Hollywood, radical African filmmakers, and popular African cinema. Students apply sociopolitical analysis to the subject matter, uncovering for instance, apartheid ideology behind the portrayal of Africans in the film "The gods must be crazy."

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: LECTURE

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Regular attendance and active participation, presentations/essays/exams/ projects. Participants must be willing to do extensive reading and analysis.

 

 

POLT 34050-01 POLITICS IN EAST ASIA SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 323, ext. 4-3581

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: Two courses in the social sciences.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines contemporary political relations in and with East Asia, focusing in particular on China, the Koreas and Japan. Through non-fiction, literature and film, we pay special attention to everyday experiences of life and popular movements as lenses on broader political and historical relations. Doing so allows us to gain a richer understanding of the range of actors, relations and processes that constitute ‘international relations.’ We will also explore how our own lives intertwine with political relations in the region. This involves examining the United States’ historical and contemporary relations with East Asia. It also involves interrogating dominant representations of the region we are often exposed to—the ‘Far East,’ the ‘China Threat,’ and North Korea’s inclusion in the ‘Axis of Evil’—in order to reflect on how such representations shape perceptions and political relationships. Some of the questions and issues the course focuses on include: How might we interpret claims that China poses a “threat” to the US—and why is the US increasingly characterized as a “threat” to China? How do popular and official memories of colonialism and World War II shape relations in the region today? How might environmental problems in the region, many of which transcend borders, be addressed given interstate rivalries and the emphasis on economic growth? What can we learn from the triple disaster in Fukushima, Japan? Why are China and Japan (and Korea and Japan, and Russia and Japan) fighting over small, often uninhabited islands? How likely is the reunification of North and South Korea? Why did an ongoing dispute over a US military base in Okinawa bring down a Japanese prime minister?

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture and discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: active participation, weekly blog contributions, one paper and a final exam. Grading based on above requirements.

 

 

POLT 35000-01 ST: PHILOSOPHY OF CONSERVATISM SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, ext. 4-1258

ENROLLMENT: 30

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: A critical survey of the main sources and currents of conservative thought. We begin with the hierarchical visions of Plato, Aquinas, and Nietzsche. Next, we look at anti-statism, from Locke to Hayek. The third section covers conservatives who emphasize the value of tradition and scepticism about the possibility of improvement in human affairs, such as Burke and Oakeshott. Last, we survey modern American variations on these themes, from paleocons to neocons.


 


 

POLT 37000-01 ST: PUBLIC POLICY: YOUTH POLICY: Polic(y)ing the Kids: The construction of youth in US public policy  LA SS

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR:  Adnan Selimović

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

STUDENTS: Open to all interested student who meet the prerequisites.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we will explore the engagement of policymakers with youth and the operating assumptions that undergird this engagement. We'll look at policy as a process of the definition and regulation of population; specifically youth. 


The course will engage with case studies of youth life in the West, covering themes such as: social responsibility, generational obligation, delinquency, protection and nurturing, and education. With our grasp of theory and an understanding of empirical conditions gleaned through analysis of case studies, we will be able to think carefully about the ways in which youth are constructed as subjects of educational, legal, political, and broadly social, regimes of power and knowledge. 

Each student will be required to undertake a half-semester-long research project investigating an issue of her or his choosing related to youth and public policy and engaging with the theoretical materials provided in class. Students will present their research to the class for discussion at the end of the semester.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: : Readings, regular active participation in class discussions. Small weekly reflection papers and a larger research paper.


 

 

POLT 40100-01 SEMINAR: WITNESS TO WAR, OCCUPATION AND DISPLACEMENT SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Junior/senior standing; three courses in the social sciences, of which at least one must be in Politics.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will explore the role of law in the struggles over land ownership in the Palestinian Territories and Colombia. We will also examine U.S., Israeli, Egyptian and Colombian policies that have contributed to the militarization of society, political repression, economic inequalities and displacements. We will study multiple strategies of resistance to injustices, including various approaches to acting as witnesses to official and unofficial forms of repression, in Palestine, Colombia and Egypt. Witnessing approaches include litigation, reporting, film-making, religious practices, street protests, the creation of art and literature, accompaniment, and non-violent direct action. This seminar will include Classrooms Beyond Borders teaching strategies, where students will be communicating directly with their peers in Palestine and Egypt. For final projects, students will serve as witnesses to injustices experienced by people living outside the protections of state law. Students may work alone or in groups on these projects.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Classes will include discussions, student presentations, films and possibly video conferences.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students are required read assigned material, conduct independent research, lead class discussions, complete a final witnessing project related to Iraq, Colombia, or Palestine, write brief reflections on the readings and complete analytical essays, and participate in Beyond Borders activities.

 

POLT 40102-01 SEMINAR IN CP/IR SS LA
Seminar: Violent Ethnic Conflict
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITE: Junior or Senior standing; and 3 courses in social sciences or equivalent, of which must be Politics.

STUDENTS: Open to interested students who meet prerequisites
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To what EXTENT ARE WARS MOTIVATED BY CULTURAL OR NATIONAL IDENTITY? Starting with this question we explore the sources of violent conflicts described as ethnic. We’ll look at the political, military, and cultural origins of the nation-state and the role of culturally-defined violence in constituting state, national, and group boundaries. Cases will include Yugoslavia/Bosnia, Rwanda, the United States and other cases.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance and active participation in Seminar; reaction papers for each reading; final research paper.


POLT 40201  Seminar: US Politics 

Topic: American Liberalisms
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR:   Adnan Selimović 
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITE: Junior or Senior standing; and 3 courses in social sciences or equivalent, of which must be Politics. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:This seminar course will explore the legacy of liberalism (as a political theory and an ideology) in the American political project. Liberalism has a complicated history of interaction with American democratic thought; its preoccupations with atomistic individualism, instrumental politics, and interestedness of political life have had a complex allegiance to the American political economy. Therefore, in this course we will ask: What are the many faces of America liberalism? What has American liberalism needed to sustain itself in American historical culture? What are its limitations and internal contradictions? What solutions is it not able to (or unwilling) to provide; what kinds of alternatives can we glimpse from these boundaries? Ultimately, how does studying American liberalism help us make sense of what is going on in the American political culture and institutions today?

 

We will follow the development of American liberalism from its first articulations to its many transformations (especially that of conservative liberalism of the 1950s towards its latest transformation of neoliberalism). Together we will struggle with the historical ambassadors of American liberal thought such as Jefferson, Dewey, Dahl, and Rawls, among others; as well as its many critics such as Tocqueville, Bourne, Marcuse, Harvey and other representatives of critical theoretical traditions. Examples of topics that will invariably arise are: imperial beginnings of liberalism, functionalism and rational choice doctrines, civic society and ideologies of consent, atomistic individualism and (anti-)democratic politics, political justice and doctrines of competitive individualism, and liberalism and capitalist ideology.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar discussions.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, regular active participation in class discussions. Small weekly reflection papers and a larger research paper.

 

POLT 40500-01 INTERNSHIPS: POLITICS NLA

POLT 40550-01 INTERNSHIPS: INTERNATIONAL POLITICS NLA

INSTRUCTOR: Thomas Shevory

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Junior or Senior standing; and 3 courses in social sciences or equivalent, of which must be Politics.

STUDENTS: Interested students should see Thomas Shevory to register for an internship.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields. Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs. Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas. Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements. Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work. Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.


 

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