Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses Fall 2006

Dept of Politics, Fall 2006

10100 01 U.S. Politics LEC 25 Juan Arroyo MWF 10:00 AM 10:50 AM SMID-108

10100 02 U.S. Politics LEC 25 Juan Arroyo MWF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM SMID-108

10100 03 U.S. Politics LEC 25 Alex Moon MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM SMID-111

10100 04 U.S. Politics LEC 25 Alex Moon MWF 01:00 PM 01:50 PM SMID-111

10100 05 U.S. Politics LEC 28 Thomas Shevory TR 08:00 AM 09:15 AM FRND-301

10100 12 U.S. Politics LEC 90 Martin Brownstein TR 10:50 AM 12:05 PM PARK-AUD
Discussion sections of 10100-12:
10100 06 U.S. Politics DIS 15 Martin Brownstein T 04:00 PM 05:15 PM FRND-307
10100 07 U.S. Politics DIS 15 Martin Brownstein R 04:00 PM 05:15 PM FRND-307
10100 08 U.S. Politics DIS 15 Martin Brownstein T 05:25 PM 06:40 PM FRND-102
10100 09 U.S. Politics DIS 15 Martin Brownstein W 05:25 PM 06:40 PM FRND-301
10100 10 U.S. Politics DIS 15 Martin Brownstein R 05:25 PM 06:40 PM FRND-301
10100 11 U.S. Politics DIS 15 Martin Brownstein W 04:00 PM 05:15 PM SMID-107

10110 01 First Year Seminar: Democracy or Deception? LEC 20 Donald Beachler MWF 02:00 PM 02:50 PM SMID-108, F 03:00 PM 03:50 PM SMID-108

12300 01 Political Justice LEC 28 Beth Harris TR 09:25 AM 10:40 AM SMID-107

12300 02 Political Justice LEC 28 Beth Harris TR 02:35 PM 03:50 PM SMID-108

12800 01 Intro to Int'l Relations LEC 28 Tomas Larsson MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM FRND-303

12800 02 Intro to Int'l Relations LEC 28 Tomas Larsson MWF 01:00 PM 01:50 PM FRND-303

12900 01 Intro to Global Studies LEC 60 Peyi Soyinka-Airewele TR 10:50 AM 12:05 PM TEXT-101

14200 01 Ideas and Ideologies LEC 28 Charles Venator Santiago TR 04:00 PM 05:15 PM FRND-302

14200 02 Ideas and Ideologies LEC 28 Charles Venator Santiago TR 05:25 PM 06:40 PM FRND-302

14300 01 Understanding Capitalism LEC 28 Naeem Inayatullah MWF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM FRND-301

14500 01 Politics of Identity LEC 20 Asma Barlas TR 01:10 PM 02:25 PM SMID-114

20230 01 Hnrs Int Sem: Pop Music LEC 20 Thomas Shevory TR 02:35 PM 03:50 PM SMID-107

23000 01 The Holocaust LEC 30 Donald Beachler MW 06:50 PM 08:05 PM FRND-304

31900 01 Race & US Politics LEC 25 Alex Moon MWF 03:00 PM 03:50 PM SMID-111

33000 01 European Politics LEC 25 Juan Arroyo MWF 02:00 PM 02:50 PM SMID-111

33100 01 Latin American Politics LEC 28 Charles Venator Santiago TR 01:10 PM 02:25 PM FRND-302

34001 01 Africa Through Film LEC 27 Peyi Soyinka- Airewele T 04:00 PM 06:30 PM SMID-108

34300 01 Feminist Theory LEC 22 Zillah Eisenstein TR 09:25 AM 10:40 AM SMID-114

37000 01 Politics of Wealth & Poverty LEC 28 Donald Beachler MW 04:00 PM 05:15 PM FRND-303

Seminars:

40100 02 European Parties & Ideologies SEM 10 Juan Arroyo M 04:00 PM 06:30 PM FRND-104

40100 01 Global Political Econ of Oil SEM 15 Naeem Inayatullah W 03:00 PM 05:30 PM SMID-108

40200 01 Gay Politics SEM 15 Martin Brownstein M 06:50 PM 09:20 PM FRND-307

Tutorials:

40300 01 Development & Social Transf TUT 5 Peyi Soyinka-Airewele W 03:00 PM 05:30 PM CHS-413

40400 01 Theory & Practice of Toleratio TUT 5 Alex Moon T 06:50 PM 09:20 PM FRND-307

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Course Descriptions Fall 2006

The following descriptions are from the H&S Supplement:

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS (310)

The curriculum is designed to give students an understanding of political organization and political forces in modern society, to provide knowledge and a basis for insight and judgment on the problems involved in the relationship of the individual to government and of governments to one another.  Students are prepared for the intelligent performance of the functions of citizenship, for careers in public service, foreign relations, teaching at the secondary level, the study of law and for study at the graduate level.

POLT-10100-01, 02      U.S. POLITICS       SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo

ENROLLMENT: 25 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: Institutions, processes, and cultural roots of U.S. politics.   Complex interrelationships among a highly specific set of political-economic institutions which have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society; Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process.  Analysis of specific policies, such as social security, abortion, the drinking age, health care, taxes, etc.

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion/lecture

 

POLT-10100-03, 04     U.S. POLITICS      SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR:  Alex Moon

ENROLLMENT: 25 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES. This course has three main purposes.  In ascending order of importance, it seeks to familiarize students with the role of voters, interest groups, the media and parties in the American political system.  We will examine the dynamics of American political institutions and (some of) the origins of (some of) the current political cleavages in the U.S.; it will examine the gap between the ideals and practices of American politics.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture/discussion

 

POLT-10100-05     U.S. POLITICS     SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Tom Shevory, Muller 315, Ext. 4-1347

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: Course involves critical approaches to U.S. politics.  A historical overview is provided, including attention to arguments regarding the meaning of the constitution and contemporary criticism of it.  An analysis and critique of the U.S. political economy is offered with specific reference to challenges and opportunities resulting from ?globalization.?  Institutional aspects of U.S. politics are considered: Congress, the Presidency, the courts, and the electoral system.  Civil rights and liberties are discussed in relation to issues of race and gender.  Considerable attention is given to American foreign policy, particularly the war in Iraq. 

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture/discussion.

REQUIREMENTS: Three take-home exams.  Books include: Robert
Dahl, How Democratic is the American Constitution, Jeremy Rifkin, The European Dream,  Mike Royko, Boss, Evan Wright, Generation Kill.

GRADING: Standard

 

POLT-10100-06-11     U.S. POLITICS     SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544.

ENROLLMENT: Lecture: 90; each section: 15

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: 1) To define the reality of who actually holds political power in America. 2) To describe the institutional structures and processes of American political life. 3) To underscore the interrelationship of economics, race and politics in the United States. 4) To appreciate the sexual political tensions that infuse American politics; to recognize the centrality of feminism and gay liberation in contemporary American politics. 5) To comprehend the subtleties of personality that cause variation with the predictable patterns of American politics. 6) To understand both the repressive reality and the potential for hope and progress in American politics. 7) To understand that political disputation and argument are integral in political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse; to know that everybody is biased, and properly so. 8) To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding and great fun.

STUDENTS: A wide variety of students is encouraged to enroll in this lower-level course. Politics majors as well as majors from economics, history, and other humanities and social science majors are welcomed, as are students from business, communication, and other professional programs. Seniors welcome.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

REQUIREMENTS: Four essays and five to six books.

GRADING: Standard; re-writes welcomed.

 

POLT-12300-01, 02     POLITICAL JUSTICE     SS LA 1b g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517

ENROLLMENT:28 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES:We examine the relationships between law, politics, power, witnessing, and justice in a comparative context.  The readings and films draw on a number of disciplinary and professional approaches, including law, the social sciences, the humanities, and journalism.  We use case studies to analyze conflicts between nation building/national security strategies and those social and politics groups whose civil liberties are threatened by official legal and political strategies.  The case studies may explore:   1) the legal dimensions of conflicts between the Cherokee Nation, American settlers, and the United States government;  2) the legal consolidation of the Third Reich in Germany and its impact on Jewish people under its rule;  3) the legal construction of Israel?s military rule over the West Bank and Gaza Strip and the impact of military occupation on the Palestinian population;  4) the transformation of law and consequences of ?official? justice within the United States in response to threats to national security; 5) the relationship between law, violence, occupation and the reconstruction of nations within Iraq. 

FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion of readings and videos, student presentations of group research projects.

REQUIREMENTS:Reading, watching videos, open-note exams, writing, researching and preparing group projects and presenting dramatizations and group projects in class.

 

POLT-12800-01, 02   INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS   SS LA 1b, g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Staff

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: Introduces students to basic perspectives and events in world politics (international relations).  Different theoretical positions (realism, nationalism, liberalism, transnationalism, globalism, Marxism, and feminism) and methodological approaches (case study, quantitative analysis, strategic modeling) are examined critically.  The central purpose of the course is to provide the beginning student of international relations/world politics with the analytic tools necessary to understand contemporary events and to undertake advanced study in these areas. 

 

POLT-12900-01      INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES    SS LA 1b g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314

ENROLLMENT: 60

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: 1) To expose participants to critical global challenges such as the protection of human rights in a competitive marketplace and the resolution of conflicts emanating from issues such as identity politics, weapons proliferation, the use of natural resources and the globalization of capitalist production.  2) To provide fundamental analytical frames through which students can address the on-going debates on culture, global histories and the moral use of power. 3) To foster dialogue that will contribute to the personal growth of all participants.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussions, and collaborative work.

STUDENTS: Open to all interested students

REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance, full participation, presentations, tests, essays and project.

GRADING: Based on above requirements.

 

POLT-14200-01, 02     IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES      SS LA 1a, 1b

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Charles R. Venator Santiago, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

OBJECTIVES: Exploration of the philosophical and ideological roots of political life and political inquiry.  The course will address notions such as social responsibility, civil disobedience, conscientious objection, the French Revolution, Marxism, Fascism, Nazism, cultural politics, Western Liberalism, conservatism, international law and justice, human rights, patriotism, nationalism, homeland security, and identity and violence.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Two lectures Tu-Th

GRADING: Students are expected to write five short papers, to complete a journal, and to actively participate in class.

 

POLT-14300-01     UNDERSTANDING CAPITALISM     SS LA 1a 1b

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Naeem Inayatullah, Muller 325, Ext. 4-3028

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: We will explore the role of class conflict/cooperation in the making of contemporary political and social life.  We will apply mainly theoretical and some historical materials to assess capitalism?s complex relationship to such ideals as progress, freedom, equality, individuality, and justice.  We will also try to understand the personal, regional, national, and global scope of capitalism.  Topics include capitalism?s relationship with: the media, foreign policy, democratic processes, and cultural consumption such as film and music, education, and arms production.  We will try to develop an awareness of capitalism?s influence on our every day lives. 

STUDENTS: Open to all

FORMAT: Discussion and close reading of texts.

REQUIREMENTS: Eight 2-3 page papers or two 8 page papers and a comprehensive final essay.

 

POLT-14500-01 POLITICS OF IDENTITY: CULTURE, RACE, AND ETHNICITY

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Asma Barlas, CHS 101, Ext. 4-3557

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITIES: None; students who took POLT-12000-01 (FYS) may not take this course for credit.

OBJECTIVES: In this course, we will examine how people?s conceptions of race and ethnicity impact their sense of themselves and of others. Our aim in doing this will be (a) to enable a critical engagement with your own identity, and (b) to explore the social implications of identity differences.  The course won?t give you any pre-set answers, though!  Instead, it will allow you to engage such open-ended questions as: what is race?  Do racial and cultural diversity threaten ?national unity??  What are the social and psychological implications of thinking in terms of Self/ Other, white/ black, similarity/ difference?  Why are people invested in the idea of difference?  Do women and men have similar attitudes to race (and racism)?  Is being color-blind the same as being antiracist?  Is it possible to feel solidarity with people who are different from oneself?

Texts: Patrick Buchanan, The Death of the West; William Finnegan, Cold New World;  bell hooks, Black Looks; and Ruth Frankenberg, White Women, Race Matters.

FORMAT: Discussions, led by students.

 

POLT-23000-01   THE HOLOCAUST       SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  30

PREREQUISITES: One social science or humanities course.

OBJECTIVES: This course is an introductory survey of major issues related to the Holocaust.  We will examine the role of Anti-Semitism in Western Culture and the rise of the racial anti-Semitism that animated Nazi hatred of the Jews.  Among the topics to be covered are: The rise of Hitler to power; the initial policies of persecution and dispossession of the Jews and Jewish responses to these policies; the evolution of Nazi policy from expulsion of the Jews to extermination;  the role of Jewish community leadership in attempting to cope with a murderous onslaught by establishing Jews in vital industries; the cooperation of many German bureaucrats in the final solution; the relationship of the Holocaust to the Nazi?s overall racial views and their war of racial supremacy in eastern Europe; the ongoing controversy over whether more Jews could have been rescued by the nations opposing Hitler and his regime.

 

POLT-29900-01   FIELD STUDY

(SEE POLT-40500 INTERNSHIPS FOR FURTHER INFORMATION)

1 TO 6 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT:  5

PREREQUISITES: POLT-10100, one other course in the social sciences, and permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES: Opportunity for students to explore and experience facets of political life through work experience and/or field research.  Academic credit contingent upon completion of study design with departmental faculty member.  (Course may not be used to satisfy 100-level distribution requirements.)

 

POLT-31900-01  SELECTED TOPICS: RACE AND US POLITICS 

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences.

OBJECTIVES: Course begins with a short section on the history of racial subjugation and civil rights struggle in the United States.  Next, we examine the role of the South's interest in racial subjugation in accounting for the history of party alignments, retarded welfare state development, and decline of the New Deal coalition.  We end with an examination of the role of attitudes towards race in accounting for citizen views on affirmative action,
taxation, welfare, and crime.

 

POLT-33000-01    EUROPEAN POLITICS    

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: We start with the question of European identity: do we only mean the EU or something more general? Who is included or excluded, and how is this decided? Can one identify specifically European values? We will address tensions affecting the creation of a new geo-political entity called ?Europe? out of many separate European countries. We consider the mechanisms and values of the European Union. The focus will be on the ideals of such a union, as contrasted with the reality of including different nations with very different policy priorities.

 

The course provides further background by looking at some of the key European  ideological/political variations that are less familiar in the U.S. (social democracy, Christian democracy, post-communism and the far right).

 

Students will examine the political systems or selected European countries, with their distinct sets of actors and policy priorities. The emphasis will be on institutional and policy variations in how each country responds to the same needs or issues, such as economics, civil rights, immigration, regional identity, and nationalism. Students will also consider Europe?s interaction with the rest of the world, both at the level of a union and of the individual countries.

 

POLT-33100-01  LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS  SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Charles R. Venator Santiago, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 28

OBJECTIVES: Legal documents such as the Capitulaciones de Santa Fe and Fray Bartolome de las Casas? defense of the Indians stand as historical markers that set the ideological foundations for the eventual creation of political institutions in Latin America.  This course will provide the students with an introduction to the formation of Latin America through a discussion of legal texts and events that have shaped the historical contours of Latin America.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Two lectures Tu-Th

GRADING: Students are expected to write two research papers, and journal entries.

 

POLT-34001-01     SELECTED TOPICS: AFRICA THROUGH FILM     SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, Ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT: 27

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: ?Africa Through Film? will introduce participants to the politics, historiographies, cultures and societies of Africa through a variety of cinematic and visual lenses.  We will study power, marginality, resistance, socio-political change, memory, culture, gender relations and contested identity and interrogate some of the dominant representations of African societies and issues.  Our background readings will engage self-defining narratives, counter-narratives and alternative paradigms, so that participants gain an introduction to African societies and also discover rich and under-explored sources that elicit the complexities of the African continent.

STUDENTS: Open to all.

REQUIREMENTS: Attendance, active participation, essays/exams.

GRADING: Based on above.

              

POLT-34300-01    FEMINIST THEORY   SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext 4-3554

ENROLLMENT: 22

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: This course introduces and then explores the multiple meanings and varieties of feminism.  In order to do this we also interrogate the very meanings and multiplicities of sex and gender and race.  We start with clarifying several forms of ?western feminism? and then critically compare these strains to feminisms defined by women of color?African American, Chicana/Mexicana, inside the US.  The course also examines feminisms in Eastern Europe and feminisms in several Arab countries.  The course will end with an examination of feminisms in the Afghan and Iraq wars.  Students are asked to assess the similarities and the differences that exist within each feminism and between them and to query whether feminism is inherently ?western? as it so often is thought to be.

 

POLT-37000-01  SELECTED TOPICS IN PUBLIC POLICY    SS LA

POLITICS OF WEALTH AND POVERTY    

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249.

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: The course will focus on the politics of wealth and poverty.  After an extensive consideration of various policy approaches to the global economy, the course will focus on domestic problems.  Among the topics to be covered are economic inequality, the attack on America?s modest welfare state, the working poor, and welfare reform. 

STUDENTS: Open to all interested student who meet the prerequisites.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

REQUIREMENTS: 5-6 books, in-class midterm and final exam, research paper on a policy issue.

GRADING: Standard.

 

POLT-40100-01     SEMINAR     SS LA

THE GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF OIL

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Naeem Inayatullah, Muller 325, Ext. 4-3028

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent 

OBJECTIVES: First, we will be interested in understanding the market structure of oil.  By market structure I mean: Which firms and states produce oil?  How much do they produce?  How much control do they have over production?  Which peoples and states consume oil?  How much do they consume?  Is the world oil market ?free? or is it closer to an oligopoly?  Is oil scarce or is there a glut?  We will be examining all these questions historically.  That is, we will want to know how the answers to these questions changed over time.

 

Second, we will be concerned with understanding the geopolitical consequences of the oil market.  Reciprocally, we wish to know how oil markets can shape geopolitics.  Put simply, we will want to examine the relationship between oil markets and international relations.  Again, we will proceed with these questions historically. 

 

The goal of the course will be to assess the overlap between global capitalism and the international state system by examining the crucial commodity of oil.

 

Representative books include: Daniel Yergin, The Prize, William Engdahl, A Century of War, Michael Klare, Blood and Oil, and the novel by Abdelrahman Munif, Cities of Salt.

 

FORMAT: Discussion

ASSESSMENT: Some combination of short, medium, and long papers

 

POLT-40100-02     SEMINAR     SS LA

EUROPEAN PARTIES AND IDEOLOGIES

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent. 

OBJECTIVES: Ideas and ideologies are covered in other courses, so this one concentrates on how political parties translate their ideologies into specific policies. Who is addressed by and who supports these ideologies? How do the parties push their programs? For example, the political process may often lead to an adaptation of the ideology, or alliances/coalitions with other political forces. What role do leaders play in representing the parties? thinking? The course focuses on the families of political parties in Europe: Social Democracy, Christian Democracy, Liberal Democrats, the Radical Right, the Communists and post-communists, the Greens, and

separatist/regionalist parties. There will also be room for including different parties from other regions of the world. After briefly reviewing their philosophical roots, we turn to look at their specific policies as responses to their own definitions of what the nation?s problems are. We examine specific political conflicts to find patterns of inputs that help or hinder parties in achieving their goals. We end each unit by reflecting on the possible future of that family of parties.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Some lecture and much discussion.

REQUIREMENTS: Participation in class discussions; written, annotated bibliography on party family of your choice, and presentation thereof in class; readings. Two medium (8-12 pages) papers, to be incorporated into the final one of approx. 30 pages.

 

POLT-40200-01     SEMINAR     SS  LA

GAY POLITICS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544.

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: To explore the convergence of psychosexual and political concerns; to study some of the prominent areas where public policy is affected by sexual identification; to place some emphasis on AIDS, gay/military issues, and same-sex marriages; to explore the rediscovery of the gay past and to learn the importance of that rediscovery for contemporary gay politics.

STUDENTS: Predominantly upper-level politics majors and minors, but all interested upper-level students are invited to apply.

FORMAT AND STYLE: One seminar meeting per week, with heavy emphasis on lively class discussion.

REQUIREMENTS:   Approximately ten to twelve books will be required.  Three take-home essay examinations will be required.

GRADING: Traditional A-F grading will be used.

 

POLT-40300-01    TUTORIAL     SS LA

DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: Through international case studies, projects and engaged research, students will problematize development discourse, humanize the issues related to poverty and social injustice and discuss some successful initiatives for political and socio-economic change in various societies. Apart from a critical study of the existing literature and traditional ?development? paradigms, the course will help students to rethink their own point of entry into the subject matter, to divine their areas of passion and to explore the question of complicities, responsibilities and capacities. Participants should be interested in developing their ability to: work as informed scholar-practitioners on social advocacy and development issues; design context-aware projects; write proposals; collaboratively execute and evaluate projects that address issues such as peace-building, poverty alleviation and democratic engineering etc.

FORMAT: Research, Discussion, Practicum

STUDENTS: Open only to those who fulfill prerequisites and are interested in the subject matter. Participants must enjoy and have a strong capacity for independent and collaborative research and writing.

REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance, active participation, research & field work, projects, presentations & essays.

GRADING: Based on fulfillment of above requirements.

 

POLT-40400-01     TUTORIAL     SS LA

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF TOLERATION

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent; permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES: What are the limits of toleration?  Why have most societies in the history of the world not been tolerant?  Course covers history of the concept of toleration from its development in the 16th and 17th centuries; justifications of it based on the value of public order, autonomy, happiness, moral skepticism, and political rationality; criticism of it as incoherent, repressive, ethnocentric, or inegalitarian; and contemporary issues such as hate speech, pornography, and the Salman Rushdie case.  Throughout we will try to answer questions about what toleration actually requires: Does it require simply leaving different groups and people alone?  Does it require enabling all groups to enjoy some measure of equality?  Does it require recognition, maybe even affirmation, of tolerated groups and their ways of life?

FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion

REQUIREMENTS: Two ten-page papers.

GRADING: Standard

 

POLT-40500-01  INTERNSHIPS  NLA

VARIABLE CREDIT

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields.  Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs.  Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas.  Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements.  Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

STUDENTS: Interested students should see Tom Shevory, Muller 315, to register for an internship.

REQUIREMENTS: Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work.  Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.

 

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