Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses Spring 2012

 

 DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS

 

All Politics Department courses are open to all students who meet the prerequisites. For information on requirements for an Politics major or minor, please see Chip Gagnon, Politics Department, 324 Muller Faculty Center, vgagnon@ithaca.edu.

Course schedule: /hs/depts/politics/docs/schedules/s12schedule/

Course Descriptions:

POLT 10100-01,02 U.S. POLITICS LA SS, h
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None
STUDENTS:  Open to all students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  Institutions, processes, and cultural/ideological roots of U.S. politics.  We begin by studying a framework of ideologies that will help us to understand the political-economic institutions that have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society: Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process. Throughout, we will constantly ask: how democratic is this place? What are your criteria for measuring democracy? The class will consider the many ways in which money affects the ability of citizens to influence the political process. The 2010 health care reform will be analyzed in greater detail from a variety of perspectives, along with other prominent issues in social, economic and foreign policy.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Discussion/lecture
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, active participation in class discussions, class presentation, 2 short papers (5 pages), final paper (7-10 pages)

 

POLT 10100-03 U.S. POLITICS LA SS, h
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258
ENROLLMENT: 90
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course has three main purposes. In ascending order of importance, it seeks to familiarize students with the role of voters, interest groups, the media, and parties in the American political system. We will examine the dynamics of American political institutions and (some of) the origins of (some of) the current political cleavages in the U.S.; it will examine the gap between the ideals and practices of American politics.
COURSE FORMAT/ STYLE: Lecture/discussion

 

POLT 12200-01,02 POLITICS AND SOCIETY LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714
ENROLLMENT: 27
PREREQUISITES:  None
STUDENTS:  Open to all
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This politics introductory course explores the impact of social forces and societal dynamics on politics of diverse countries, as well as the influence of politics and the state on society. Students will be learning and analyzing current world political events that are not so well covered in the mainstream media, such as why/when do democracies emerge but also breakdown, why is state power wielded in repressive manners in different types of political systems, what impact does citizen activism have in global and national political and economic issues, and what role do international actors play in reconstructing governments. In the process of examining these issues we will also learn about the history and political processes and events in a variety of countries, such as Chile, North Korea, Venezuela, Sudan, Rwanda, China, and others. Students will analyze the political conflicts in these different countries from a political-sociological approach.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, group discussion, films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: short opinion papers, exams, group discussion

 

POLT 12300-01,02 POLITICAL JUSTICE SS LA 1b g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517

ENROLLMENT: 27 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

COURSE DECSRIPTION: We examine the relationships between collective identities, law, politics, power, witnessing, and justice in comparative contexts. The readings and films draw on a number of disciplinary and professional approaches, including law, the social sciences, the humanities, and journalism. We use case studies to analyze conflicts between nation building/national security strategies and those social and politics groups whose civil liberties are threatened by official legal and political strategies. This course is included within the interdisciplinary, transnational Classrooms Beyond Borders project. Through the use of digital technologies, students will share and discuss several readings with students at An Najah University in the West Bank. The case studies may explore: 1) the legal dimensions of conflicts between Native Americans, American settlers, and the United States government; 2) the legal consolidation of the Third Reich in Germany and its impact on Jewish people under its rule; 3) the legal construction of Israel’s military rule over the West Bank and Gaza Strip and the impact of military occupation on the Palestinian population; and 4) recent transformations of law and “official” norms of justice within the United States.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion of readings and videos, video conferences, student presentations of group research projects; and blog communications beyond classroom borders.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Reading, watching videos, open-note exam, writing case briefs and essays, maintaining blogs with commentaries related to course curriculum; researching and preparing group projects, and presenting group projects in class.

 

POLT 12800-01 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SS LA 1b, g
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR:  Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103

ENROLLMENT:  30

PREREQUISITES:  None
STUDENTS:  Open to all.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  We examine and discuss issues of security ranging from security of the state to security of individuals. Issues include the future of war, terrorism, the global economy, nationalism, ethnic and religious conflict, and the role of the media in how we think about the international.  We also study how different perspectives lead us to see different worlds, looking specifically at realism, liberalism, global humanism, and theories of identity. This course counts as a Comparative and International Studies course for the purposes of the Politics major, the Concentration in International Studies, and the International Politics minor.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Lectures, discussions, films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Attendance and participation in class discussions; readings for each class; three take-home exam essays.

 

POLT 12800-02 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SS LA 1b, g
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR:  Lisa Sansoucy, Ext. 4-7040
ENROLLMENT:  27
PREREQUISITES:  None
STUDENTS:  Open to all.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We examine and discuss issues of security ranging from security of the state to security of individuals. Issues include the future of war, terrorism, the global economy, nationalism, ethnic and religious conflict, and the role of the media in how we think about the international.  We also study how different perspectives lead us to see different worlds, looking specifically at
realism, liberalism, global humanism, and theories of identity.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussions, films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance and participation in class discussions; readings for each class; three take-home exam essays.

 

POLT 12900-1 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES  LA SS, g
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller, ext. 4-3508
ENROLLMENT: 30
PREREQUISITES: None
STUDENTS:  Open to those who are interested in the subject matter. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: POLT 12900, ANTH 12900, HPS 12900.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will expose participants to critical global challenges such as the protection of human security in a competitive marketplace; questions of sovereignty and state violence; and globalization and its socio-political and economic consequences.  It will foster critical thinking and writing skills and provide fundamental analytical frames through which students can address on-going debates on representation, identity, Eurocentrism and global histories. We will seek to facilitate dialogue that engenders global citizenship and contributes to the growth of all participants.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Regular attendance, full participation, presentations, tests, essays and project.

 

 

POLT 14100-01 POWER: RACE, SEX AND CLASS LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext. 4-3554
ENROLLMENT: 43
PREREQUISITES:  None
STUDENTS: Majors and non-majors alike.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We will deal with the distribution of power in the U.S. according to economic class, sex, and race hierarchies. We discuss what power is, where it comes from, where it is located. This involves the analysis of power in terms of issues of capitalism, globalism, patriarchy, and racism, as well as the specific issues they raise for policy making, persons, the family, and corporate power. The analysis will hopefully help us understand the relations of power defining black working class women, white male workers, white middle class women, etc. The premise of the course is that in order to understand capitalist society one must understand the racialized aspects of sexuality as a form of power, as well as the sexualized aspects of race. Some specific topics discussed are: the present global and national economic crisis; changing aspects of the nation-state; Bush/Cheney’s wars of/on terror; the Gulf Wars 1991-2010; the Chilean 1973 Coup; Obama’s politics of hope; the changing realities of the middle/working class; the global racialized sexual division of labor; the rise of China in the global market; the continued aftermath of the O.J. Simpson trial, and so on.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students will read a variety of books and see several films.  They write two 7-page analytical papers based on the course readings and films. Grading is based on the two writing projects and class participation. Both essays must be completed for course credit.

 

POLT 14200-01,02 IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES SS LA 1a, 1b

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 323, Ext. 4-3581

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course explores the ideological roots of political life and political inquiry. Through readings, film, art, music and your own observations, the course focuses on key political ideas and the ideological debates over their meaning and practice. We will examine a range of views on concepts such as liberty, equality, democracy, rationality, security, order, authority, community and nation. We will consider how these and other political ideas developed historically, why certain ideas endure, and why they remain important to understanding politics today. In doing so we will also pay close attention to how political ideas intertwine with constructions of class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. The course encourages critical reflection on where our views about the world come from, and on aspects of political life that we take for granted. Encounters with political theories different from our own subjective views help bring to light our unconscious assumptions and also what is distinctive about our political views. Ideological perspectives the course explores include liberalism and conservatism (and their “neo” variants), socialism, anarchism, and fascism.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture and discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: active participation, weekly blog contributions and a semester-long final project. Grading is based on above requirements.

 

 

POLT 30300-01 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES SS LA

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext: 4-3517

ENROLLMENT: 30 per section

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

STUDENTS: Primarily politics and legal studies majors, but open to all who meet prerequisites.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Throughout this course we will attempt to come to terms with the content, character and role of constitutional norms in modern America. Our studies typically will begin with significant Supreme Court decisions, but we also will examine the broader political and social conflicts, debates and cultural practices involving basic rights. We will give attention to the role of race, class, gender and citizenship in the scope of the judicial protection of rights. Our inquiry will focus on two general categories of constitutionally authorized civil liberties: 1) the rights of suspected criminals related to due process, and 2) the rights to belief, expression, religion and association.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Students will discuss significant Supreme Court decisions and supplementary readings. Students will develop and present group projects that explore legal debates and analyze the significance of constitutional doctrine in political conflicts. Students must be willing to prepare for class by briefing cases, participate in class discussions, and work in groups outside of the class period to prepare group projects.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADES: Texts may include a casebook of Supreme Court opinions, a text concerning judicial review of anti-terrorism policies, and A Promise of Justice, by David Protess and Rob Warden. Grades will be based on open-note exams, essays and in-class presentations.

 

POLT 30600-01 US FOREIGN POLICY LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Muller 333, ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT:  30
PREREQUISITE:  Three courses in the social sciences or equivalent.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will include an historical overview of U.S. Foreign Policy, but is focused on contemporary issues such as the war with Al Qaeda, the occupation of Iraq, and U.S. Middle East policy. Attention will be paid to the politics of intervention in cases of genocide. We will also consider the normative issues surrounding the cost and consequences of being a super-power/empire.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Lecture and Discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Read 5-6 book and assigned articles.  There will be two exams (mid-term and a final exam) and a research paper.

 

 

POLT 32000-01 ST: Politics of Work in the US

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Jenny Stepp Breen

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: 3 courses in the social sciences

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores the topic of work in the United States from a political and social perspective, drawing heavily upon theoretical and historical accounts to help us understand the deeper issues at stake in political battles regarding work and how these understandings have changed over time. The course is structured around four major categories of labor and its social organization in the United States: slavery, industrialization, women’s work, and post-industrialization. We will study these topics conceptually with an eye toward understanding the unique theoretical, political, and moral arguments at stake with each type of labor. Readings will be primarily theoretical and historical.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion of the readings

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Essays and class participation

 

POLT 33500-01 CROSSING BORDERS/GLOBAL MIGRATION SS LA
3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103

ENROLLMENT:  29
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences or equivalent.
STUDENTS: Open to all interested students who fulfill the prerequisites.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Why do people move across borders? Why is immigration such a volatile political issue around the world? What are the effects on national and cultural identity and boundaries? Immigration and population movements have in fact become the focus of politics throughout the globe, often linked to xenophobia and other forms of violence. We’ll explore the phenomenon of global migration, including labor migration and refugees; consider how immigration/emigration differs from other kinds of movement; how population mobility highlights the construction and reconstruction of nation-states; the ways in which the resulting cultural diversity plays into local and nation-state politics; and how cultural diasporas influence politics in their home and host countries. We’ll also consider these questions as they affect local communities (including upstate NY) and explore the gendered nature of migration. This course counts as a Comparative and International Studies course for the purposes of the Politics major, the Concentration in International Studies, and the International Politics minor.
COURSE FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion, lecture, films, fiction and nonfiction readings.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three papers and a take-home exam. Standard grading

 

POLT 33700–1 POLITICS OF MEMORY LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller, ext. 4-3508
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None
STUDENTS:  Open to those who are interested in the subject matter.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Exploration of the political and social dilemmas surrounding concepts such as collective memory, truth, justice, confession, forgiveness, healing and reconciliation in socio-political spaces. How, for instance, will the political suppression or mobilization of memory vie for space with efforts to address the systematization of unconscionable crimes against humanity and create a just peace? What lessons do the experiences of South Africa, the USA, Chile, and Rwanda offer other polarized societies? Students engage memory theory and the narratives of victims and perpetrators in examining Czech writer Milan Kundera’s suggestion that “the struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.”  This course counts as a Comparative and International Studies course for the purposes of the Politics major, the Concentration in International Studies, and the International Politics minor.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Regular attendance, full participation, presentations, tests, essays.

 

POLT 34003-01 ST: COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES LA SS

TOPIC: MILITARIZATION OF EVERYDAY LIFE

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 315, Ext. 4-3581

ENROLLMENT: 25

COURSE DESCRIPTION: From fashion trends, Hollywood films and video games, to military recruitment in public schools, privatization of the military and the politics of US bases overseas, this course examines the ways in which people and social relations become objects of militarization. The course takes a broad view of militarization as an everyday, “peacetime” process in order to better understand our relationships to state power as individuals, as citizens, and as members of local and global communities. The course begins by looking at some of the central ways American culture and institutions are militarized. We then broaden our scope to explore how these taken-for-granted processes intersect with the militarization of social, political and economic relations globally. Throughout the course, we explore how and why militarization plays out differently for different people, particularly in terms of gender, class, race, sexuality and citizenship. Through readings, films and your own experiences, we will critically examine the processes that give rise to and sustain militarization--and the ways in which we are all complicit in the militarization of everyday life. This course counts as a Comparative and International Studies course for the purposes of the Politics major, the Concentration in International Studies, and the International Politics minor.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture/discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: active participation, weekly blog contributions, one paper and a final take-home exam.

 

POLT 34004-01 ST: COMPARATIVE-INTERNATIONAL: THE POLITICS OF GLOBAL CAPITALISM LA SS

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, beachler@ithaca.edu, 274-1249, 333 Muller Faculty Center

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in Social Sciences or Equivalent

STUDENTS: Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will deal with a variety of issues confronting the global political economy. These issues will be addressed from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Among the topics covered are the politics of trade, currency values (especially with respect to the U.S Dollar, the Euro the Chinese RMB), foreign aid, debt, development, trans-national corporations, the global financial crisis, and international organizations such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. The political and ethical consequences of policy decisions are a core concern of the course.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/Discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Read 3-4 books and other assigned readings available on Blackboard. There will be three take-home essay exams(the final will be the third exam).

 

POLT 34051-01 ST: COMP/INTERNATIONAL STUDIES: EUROPEAN UNION LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
STUDENTS:  Open to all students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  The course will be organized into a number of themes. We begin by asking how the EU started; how a specific group of politicians created this entity in response to social and political challenges. Students will be introduced to different theoretical frameworks that explain the emergence and evolution of the EU. Second, how does it work? Institutions and organization of the EU. Third: The policies produced by the EU, and the resulting tensions with member states and with other international actors. Fourth: Expansion. Where does Europe end? What kind of union is this? What is the basis for European identity? The case of Turkey as possible future member of the EU will be considered. Fifth: In-class simulation of a meeting of the Council of the European Union to decide EU policy on a pressing policy issue. Sixth: Foreign policy. The EU foreign policy structures and specific expressions of EU relations with other countries/regions of the world. Finally, we will take a step back and evaluate the EU. Why is it democratic or not? Why does it work, or not? This course counts as a Comparative and International Studies course for the purposes of the Politics major, the Concentration in International Studies, and the International Politics minor.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:  Lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 1 map quiz, three papers (8-10 pages each), one in-class presentation, and active class participation.

 

POLT 34300-01 FEMINIST THEORY(ies) SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext 4-3554

ENROLLMENT: 29

PREREQUISITES: you need to be at least a sophomore

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course introduces and then explores the multiple meanings and varieties of feminisms. In order to do this we also interrogate the very meanings and multiplicities of sex and gender and race. We start with clarifying several forms of ‘western feminisms’ and then critically compare these strains to feminisms defined by women of color—African American, Chicana/Mexicana, inside the US. The course also examines feminisms in Eastern Europe and feminisms in several Arab and/or Muslim countries. The course will end with an examination of feminisms in the Afghan and Iraq wars. Students are asked to assess the similarities and the differences that exist within each feminism and between them and to query whether feminism is inherently ‘western’ as it so often is thought to be, or rather, a more complex mix of global and cultural and economic flows.

 

 

POLT 35000-01 ST IN POLITICAL THEORY: RELIGION AND POLITICS LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Prior to the 17th century, most justifications of political authority were based on religious beliefs.  Beginning in the 17th century, political theorists increasingly tried to justify political authority on secular grounds.  Why is this so?  We will examine this question through study of canonical texts of political and social theory, historical materials, and theological writings.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: several two-page papers, final, class participation

 

POLT 36600-all sections ENVIRONMENTAL POLTICS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tom Shevory, 315 Muller Faculty Center, Ext. 4-1347
ENROLLMENT: 30 per section
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Course considers an array of environmental topics from multiple political perspectives:  feminist environmentalism, environmental justice, climate change, food and agriculture, water scarcity, radical action, species depletion. Course topics will be connected to screenings and events connected to the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival. Possible texts include:Eric Klinenberg, Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster, Kimberly Smith, African-American Environmental Thought, Michael Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, Craig Rosebraugh, Burning Rage of a Dying Planet: Speaking for the Earth Liberation Front, Tom Shevory, Toxic Burn, Kenneth Murchison, The Snail Darter Case.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Class will consist of reading, lecture, and class discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Four papers on class readings will be required.

 

POLT 40101-01 SEM: CITIZENSHIP/MOBILIZATION LA SS

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent

STUDENTS: Open to all

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This seminar focuses on a topic of great relevance in the contemporary world: citizen activism and its impact. The course will look at the major theoretical debates surrounding the emergence, buildup, and sustained impact of social movements struggling for human rights, labor and social rights, gender, environmental and other rights in a variety of political contexts in Latin America, Africa, Asia, and Middle East. By examining the goals, strategies, constraints and consequences of activism in different parts of the world, we attempt to understand what it means to exercise voice regarding alternative visions of social, economic, political, and cultural processes, and especially the personal and political challenges that voice both confronts and poses. A few of the readings included in the course will be: “From the Mines to the Streets: A Bolivian Activist’s Life” by Benjamin Kohl, Linda Farthing and Felix Muruchi (2011); “Movers and Shakers: Social Movements in Africa” by Stephen Ellis and Ineke van Kessel (eds.) (2009); “Solidarity Transformed: Labor Responses to Globalization and Crises” by Mark Anner (2011).

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: lecture, discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: papers, participation

 

POLT 40102–1 SEM: CONSPIRACY POLITICS: THEORY AND RESEARCH LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller, ext. 4-3508
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITES: 3 courses in the Social Sciences or the equivalent.
STUDENTS:  Open to those who fulfill requirements and are very interested in the subject matter.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will explore the universe of conspiracy theory and conduct collaborative research into politically charged socio-political mysteries. Cases will be drawn from within the States and other parts of the global system and may include the HIV virus debate, CIA mysteries, 9-11 controversies, alien landings and political assassinations.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and Seminar Discussions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Regular attendance, active participation, field research, presentations, projects and essays.

 

POLT 40103-01 SEMINAR: POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE HOLOCAUST SS  LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and three courses in social sciences or the equivalent
STUDENTS: Juniors and Seniors
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The seminar will explore portions of the voluminous literature on the Holocaust to extract implications for politics. Among the topics to be considered are the conditions that permit people to participate in genocide and the human capacity for self-deception that enables people to rationalize their actions. This section of the seminar will consider the controversy raised by Daniel Goldhagen’s book Hitler’s Willing Executioners. We will also explore the academic politics of Holocaust studies by reading works that both proclaim the uniqueness of the Holocaust and by considering authors who argue that too much attention has been paid the Holocaust to the neglect of other historical instances of genocide. The ethical lessons that can be gleaned from global indifference to the destruction of the European Jews will form another segment of the seminar. The global response to atrocities in Rwanda and Bosnia will be included for comparative purposes.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: The seminar will employ a discussion format
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Five to six short papers; read 8- 10 books; regular class attendance and participation

 

POLT 40500-01 INTERNSHIPS NLA
Variable Credit
INSTRUCTOR:  Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT:  5
PREREQUISITES:  Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
STUDENTS:  Interested students should see Tom Shevory, Muller 315, to register for an internship.
COURSE DESCRIPTION:  The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields.  Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs.  Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas.  Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements.  Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:  Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work.  Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.

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