Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses: Spring 2009

(for course schedules see below)

Spring 2009 Course Descriptions

(from the H&S Supplement)


POLT 10100-01, 02 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1 h
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: Institutions, processes, and cultural/ideological roots of U.S. politics. We begin by studying a framework of ideologies that will help us to understand the political-economic institutions that have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society: Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process. Throughout, we will constantly ask: how democratic is this place? What are your criteria for measuring democracy? Students will be invited to consider how money affects the ability of citizens to influence the political process. Analysis of specific policies may include social security, abortion, health care, taxes, civil liberties, foreign policy, etc.
STUDENTS: Open to all students.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion/lecture

POLT 10200-01 and 02-05 MEDIA AND POLITICS SS LA
You must enroll in Section 01 (Lecture) as well as one discussion section (02-05)
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544
ENROLLMENT: Lecture of 60 with 4 discussion sections of 15 students each
PREREQUISITE: None
OBJECTIVES: 1. To understand the symbiotic, mutually reinforcing nature of the relationship of governmental institutions and institutions of mass media. 2. To explore the myth of the adversary relationship between the press and the public order. 3. To see how issues of public policy are presented to mass audiences in terms of symbolic valence. 4. To comprehend the ways in which elections are influenced by media. 5. To explain the salient differences in method of news presentation by alternative media sources; to see how differing methods produce different outlooks. 6. To learn how governmental regulation of electronic media is qualitatively different from the forms of regulation imposed on print media; to understand the results of that difference. 7. To identify alternative forms of governmental regulation of public media in other nations. 8. To assess the relevance of this course material for the future of American democracy, for future prospects for citizen participation in public life, and for personal development; to ask "So What?" 9. To understand that political disputation and argument are integral to political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse, to know that everybody is biased, and properly so. 10. To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding--and great fun!
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines at Ithaca College are encouraged to take this course. Students from Communications are especially welcomed, as are students from Business and all Humanities and Sciences departments. Seniors, juniors, sophomores and first-year students are all invited to apply for this course. NOTE: This course does not meet any specific Politics Department distributional requirements.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Two lectures, and one discussion class per week, and student involvement is actively sought. This course will make extensive use of films and other video materials.
REQUIREMENTS: Course requirements include approximately five books, the daily reading of The New York Times, attention to at least one weekly periodical magazine of political opinion, and at least one daily television news program. Three take-home papers are required, and these may be rewritten so that students may be afforded the chance to learn from their errors. Most fundamentally, students are expected to bring interest and enthusiasm into this course.
GRADING: Traditional A, B, C, D, F grading will be used.

POLT 12200-01, 02 POLITICS AND SOCIETY SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: This course explores the impact of social forces and societal dynamics on politics, as well as the influence of politics and the state on society. The course is structured as a series of questions that address the main themes of the course and current world events: democracy and democratic breakdown, sources and consequences of state power, reasons and consequences of revolutionary action, impact of citizen activism in global and national political and economic issues, and the role of international actors in reconstructing governments. In the process of examining these issues we will also learn about the history and political events in a variety of countries, such as Chile, North Korea, Russia, Venezuela, Sudan, China, and others.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion
GRADING: short opinion papers, exams, presentations

POLT 12800-01 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SS LA 1 g
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Naeem Inayatullah, Muller 325, Ext. 4-3028
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES:
We ask the following types of questions about the world: How do we begin to think about the world? Why is the world divided territorially? How do religious beliefs affect world politics? How do we find out what’s going on in the world? How do nation-states work? Do colonialism and slavery belong to the past? How is the world organized economically? Why are some people better off than others? How can we end poverty? Why does world politics turn to violence? What makes the world dangerous? What can we do to stop people harming others? Can we move beyond conflict? What can we do to change the world?

We also pose the following types of questions about how we learn: How can we think, rigorously, creatively, purposefully and precisely about the relations between nations, states, cultures, and individuals? How can each of us better understand our role in participating in the central global problems of our times? How can we respond to ways of thinking that strike us as politically or ethically repulsive, that are alien to our thinking, or that threaten to undermine our way of life?

Within the context of these themes we have three goals: (1) To better understand why we hold our specific values, (2) to start recognizing the themes that characterize our way of thinking; and (3) to assess the ethics of our actions in the world. Thinking and understanding are fulfilling but they can also be dangerous. Learning can bring a change in our life style, our worldview, and our relations with others. In combination, these goals amount to the idea that along with "covering" things altogether new, we also hope to "uncover" things we already know.

STUDENTS: Open to all
FORMAT AND STYLE: discussion
REQUIREMENTS: three essays
GRADING: Standard, based on above requirements

POLT 12800-02 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SS LA 1 g
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: We examine and discuss issues of security ranging from security of the state to security of individuals. Issues include the future of war, terrorism, the global economy, nationalism, ethnic and religious conflict, and the role of the media in how we think about the international. We also study how different perspectives lead us to see different worlds, looking specifically at realism, liberalism, global humanism, and theories of identity.
STUDENTS: Open to all.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussions, films.
REQUIREMENTS: Attendance and participation in class discussions; readings for each class; three take-home exam essays.
GRADING: Standard, based on above requirements.

POLT 12900-01 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES SS LA 1 g
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller, ext. 4-3508
ENROLLMENT: 60
PREREQUISITES: None
OBJECTIVES: 1) To expose participants to critical global challenges such as the protection of human security in a competitive marketplace, sovereignty and state violence, globalization and its socio-political consequences. 2) To foster critical thinking and writing skills and provide fundamental analytical frames through which students can address on-going debates on representation, identity, eurocentrism and global histories. 3) To facilitate dialogue that engenders global citizenship and contributes to the growth of all participants.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussions, and collaborative work.
REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance, full participation, presentations, tests, essays and project. Open to those who are interested in the subject matter.
Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: POLT 12900, ANTH 12900, HPS 12900.

POLT 14200-01, 02 IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES SS LA 1
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 321, Ext. 4-3581
ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
OBJECTIVES: The course explores the philosophical and ideological roots of political life and political inquiry. Through readings, film, art, music and your own observations, the course focuses on key political ideas and the ideological debates over their meaning and practice. We will examine a range of views on concepts such as liberty, equality, democracy, security, authority, and community. We will consider how these and other political ideas developed historically, why certain ideas endured, and why they remain important to understanding politics today. Ideological perspectives we will explore include liberalism and conservatism (and their “neo” variants), socialism, anarchism, and fascism. The course encourages critical reflection on aspects of political life that we take for granted. Encounters with political theories different from our own subjective views help bring to light our unconscious assumptions and also what is distinctive about our political views.”
FORMAT AND STYLE: lecture and discussion
REQUIREMENTS: active participation, weekly blog, two papers and a final project
GRADING: Based on above requirements

POLT 14200-03 IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES SS LA 1
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, ext. 4-1258
ENROLLMENT: 28
OBJECTIVES: The course will explore the philosophical and ideological roots of political life. We will examine central political concepts such as equality, freedom, authority, obligation, democracy, and justice. Then we will study some of the major political ideologies in the Western tradition: liberalism, Marxism, conservatism, fascism, and anarchism. Throughout we will focus on critical reading and the analysis of arguments.
FORMAT AND STYLE: lecture and discussion
REQUIREMENTS: active participation, weekly on-line discussion posting, two five-page papers.
GRADING: Based on above requirements

POLT 23000-01 THE HOLOCAUST SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: One social science or humanities course
OBJECTIVES: This course is an introductory survey of major issues related to the Holocaust. We will examine the role of Anti-Semitism in Western Culture and the rise of the racial anti-Semitism that animated Nazi hatred of the Jews. Among the topics to be covered are: The rise of Hitler to power; the initial policies of persecution and dispossession of the Jews and Jewish responses to these policies; the evolution of Nazi policy from expulsion of the Jews to extermination; the role of Jewish community leadership in attempting to cope with a murderous onslaught by establishing Jews in vital industries; the cooperation of many German bureaucrats in the final solution; the relationship of the Holocaust to the Nazi’s overall racial views and their war of racial supremacy in eastern Europe; the ongoing controversy over whether more Jews could have been rescued by the nations opposing Hitler and his regime.

POLT 29900-01 FIELD STUDY
(SEE POLT 40500 INTERNSHIPS FOR FURTHER INFORMATION)
1 TO 6 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: POLT 10100, one other course in the social sciences, and permission of instructor.
OBJECTIVES: Opportunity for students to explore and experience facets of political life through work experience and/or field research. Academic credit contingent upon completion of study design with departmental faculty member. (Course may not be used to satisfy 100-level distribution requirements.)

POLT 30300-01, 02 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext: 4-3517
ENROLLMENT: 28 per section
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: Throughout this course we will attempt to come to terms with the content, character and role of constitutional norms in modern America. Our studies typically will begin with significant Supreme Court decisions, but we also will examine the broader political and social conflicts, debates and cultural practices involving the basic rights. We will give attention to the role of race, class, gender, and citizenship in the scope of the judicial protection of rights. Our inquiry will focus on two general categories of constitutionally authorized civil liberties: 1) the right of suspected criminals to due process, and 2) the rights to belief, expression, religion, and association.
STUDENTS: Primarily politics and legal studies majors, but open to all who meet prerequisites.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Students will discuss significant Supreme Court decisions and supplementary readings. Students will develop and present group projects that explore legal debates and analyze the significance of constitutional doctrine in political conflicts. Students must be willing to prepare for class by briefing cases, participate in class discussions, and work in groups outside of the class period to prepare group projects.
REQUIREMENTS: Texts will include a casebook of Supreme Court opinions, a text concerning judicial review of anti-terrorism policies, and A Promise of Justice, by David Protess and Rob Warden.
GRADING: Grades will be based on open-note exams, essays, and in-class presentations.

POLT 30600-01 US FOREIGN POLICY LA SS
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT: 27
PREREQUISITE: Three courses in the social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVE: The course will include an historical overview of U.S. Foreign Policy, but is focused on contemporary issues such as the war with Al Qaeda, the occupation of Iraq, and U.S. Middle East policy. Attention will be paid to the politics of intervention in cases of genocide. We will also consider the normative issues surrounding the cost and consequences of being a super-power/empire.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and Discussion
REQUIREMENTS: Read 5-6 book and assigned articles. There will be two exams (mid-term and a final exam) and a research paper.
GRADING: Letter

POLT 33000-01 EUROPEAN POLITICS LA SS
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: We start with the question of European identity: do we only mean the EU or something more general? Who is included or excluded, and how is this decided? This will lead to a discussion of “European” values. We will address tensions affecting the creation of a new geo-political entity called Europe out of many separate European countries. We consider the structures and selected policies of the European Union. The focus will be on the ideals of such a union, as contrasted with the reality of including different nations with very different policy priorities.

The course will introduce further tools for understanding European politics by looking at some of the key European ideological/political groups that are less familiar in the U.S. (Social Democracy, Christian Democracy, the Greens, post-Communism and the far right). Similarly, the course will look at the ideas and practices behind welfare state policies: education, welfare, immigration, employment policy, and the environment.

Finally, students will examine the political systems of selected European countries, with their distinct sets of actors and policy priorities. The emphasis will be on institutional and policy variations in how each country responds to the same needs or issues, such as economics, civil rights, regional identity, and nationalism. Students will also consider Europe’s interaction with the rest of the world, both at the level of a union and of the individual countries.

POLT 33100-01 LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714
ENROLLMENT: 28
OBJECTIVES: This course examines the contemporary politics of Latin America by examining the manner in which democratic processes have occurred in recent years, and the problems and promises of historical, cultural, socio-economic, and political development patterns. The past and current role of governmental institutions, political parties, electoral rules, the military, revolutionary groups, and citizens in channeling political action and policies will be examined throughout the course. We will analyze current issues such as the impact of the Latin American leftist governments in Bolivia, Brazil, and Venezuela, the actions of embattled presidents and political parties in South America, violent and non-violent reactions to political and economic trends in Argentina, Colombia and Mexico, and the influence and problems with US foreign policy toward Central and South America.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture, discussion, speakers/films
GRADING: research paper, opinion papers, group and individual presentations.

POLT 33500-01 CROSSING BORDERS/GLOBAL MIGRATION SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: The course will address such questions as: Why do people move across borders? Why is immigration such a volatile political issue around the world? What are the effects on national and cultural identity and boundaries? Immigration and population movements have in fact become the focus of politics throughout the globe, often linked to xenophobia and other forms of violence. We’ll explore the phenomenon of global migration, including labor migration and refugees; consider how immigration/emigration differs from other kinds of movement; how population mobility highlights the construction and reconstruction of nation-states; the ways in which the resulting cultural diversity plays into local and nation-state politics; and how cultural diasporas influence politics in their home and host countries. We’ll also consider these questions as they affect local communities (including western NY State) and explore the gendered nature of migration.
STUDENTS: Open to all interested students who fulfill the prerequisites.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion, lecture, films, fiction and nonfiction readings.
REQUIREMENTS: Three papers and a take-home exam.
GRADING: Standard grading

POLT 33700 POLITICS OF MEMORY SS LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, ext. 4-3508
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences
OBJECTIVES: Exploration of the political and social dilemmas surrounding concepts such as collective memory, truth, justice, confession, forgiveness, healing and reconciliation in socio-political spaces. How, for instance, will the political suppression or mobilization of memory vie for space with efforts to address the systematization of unconscionable crimes against humanity and create a just peace? What lessons do the experiences of South Africa, the USA, Chile, and Rwanda offer other polarized societies? Students engage memory theory and the narratives of victims and perpetrators in examining Czech writer Milan Kundera’s suggestion that “the struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.”
REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance, active participation, research, essays & presentations. Open to those who fulfill prerequisites and are interested in the subject matter.
GRADING: Based on fulfillment of above requirements.

POLT 34003-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN CP/IR SS LA
TOPIC: POLITICS OF SECURITY IN EAST ASIA: CHINA, TAIWAN, THE KOREAS AND JAPAN
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 321, ext. 4-3581
ENROLLMENT: 28
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences.
OBJECTIVES: This course will investigate contested notions and practices related to security in the East Asian context. As a central theme of national politics and international relations, ‘security’ is typically a taken-for-granted concept used to analyze and/or justify state-centric military and political actions. This course takes a broad view of security as an historically contested and multi-dimensional component of all social relationships. We will examine cases of popular struggles and social change in China, Taiwan, the Koreas and Japan as a way of understanding how different conceptions of security form and get expressed at the individual, community, national and inter/transnational scales. Through this lens, we will also consider how security issues become ‘nationalized’ and how broader conceptions of security become intertwined with and marginalized by dominant notions of ‘security problems’. Cases will include clandestine resistance to internet controls in China; popular efforts to reunite North and South Korea; anti-US military base struggles in (and across) South Korea, Okinawa, and Japan; autonomist struggles in China and Japan; grassroots ties between Taiwan and China; mobilization by former military sex slaves (so-called ‘comfort women’) in Korea; labor unrest in China; transnational environmental efforts; nationalist disputes over islands in the South China Sea and Sea of Japan; and popular resistance in Japan to the ‘securitization of society’ in the context of the ‘war on terror’.
FORMAT AND STYLE: lecture and discussion
REQUIREMENTS: active participation, student presentations, two papers and a final project
GRADING: Based on above requirements

POLT 35000-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY SS LA
TOPIC: VARIETIES OF CONSERVATISM
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, ext. 4-1258
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: A critical survey of the main sources and currents of conservative thought. We begin with the hierarchical visions of Plato, Aquinas, and Nietzsche. Next, we look at anti-statism, from Locke to Hayek. The third section covers conservatives who emphasize the value of tradition and scepticism about the possibility of improvement in human affairs, such as Burke and Oakeshott. Last, we survey modern American variations on these themes, from paleocons to neocons.

POLT 36600-01, 02 ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS SS LA 1
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Tom Shevory, 315 Muller Faculty Center, 4-1347
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
OBJECTIVES: Course considers an array of environmental topics from multiple political perspectives: feminist environmentalism, environmental justice, climate change, food and agriculture, water scarcity, radical action, species depletion. Course topics will be connected to screenings and events connected to the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival. Possible texts include: Eric Klinenberg, Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster, Kimberly Smith, African-American Environmental Thought, Michael Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, Craig Rosebraugh, Burning Rage of a Dying Planet: Speaking for the Earth Liberation Front. Tom Shevory, Toxic Burn, Kenneth Murchison, The Snail Darter Case.
FORMAT: Class will consist of reading, lecture, and class discussion. Four papers on class readings will be required.

POLT 40100-01 SEMINAR IN CP/IR SS LA
TOPIC: POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE HOLOCAUST
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and three courses in social sciences or the equivalent
OBJECTIVES: The seminar will explore portions of the voluminous literature on the Holocaust to extract implications for politics. Among the topics to be considered are the conditions that permit people to participate in genocide and the human capacity for self-deception that enables people to rationalize their actions. This section of the seminar will consider the controversy raised by Daniel Goldhagen’s book Hitler’s Willing Executioners. We will also explore the academic politics of Holocaust studies by reading works that both proclaim the uniqueness of the Holocaust and by considering authors who argue that too much attention has been paid the Holocaust to the neglect of other historical instances of genocide. The ethical lessons that can be gleaned from global indifference to the destruction of the European Jews will form another segment of the seminar. The global response to atrocities in Rwanda and Bosnia will be included for comparative purposes.
STUDENTS: Juniors and Seniors
FORMAT AND STYLE: The seminar will employ a discussion format
REQUIREMENTS: Five to six short papers; read 8- 10 books; regular class attendance and participation
GRADING: Standard

POLT 40100-02 SEMINAR IN CP/IR SS LA
TOPIC: WITNESS TO WAR, OCCUPATION AND DISPLACEMENT: IRAQ, COLOMBIA, PALESTINE
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent; permission of instructor.
OBJECTIVES: This course will explore the role of law in administering the U.S. government’s occupation of Iraq and Israeli government’s occupation of Palestine. We will also examine U.S., Israeli and Colombian policies that have contributed to the creation of large refugee and internally displaced populations of Iraqis, Colombians and Palestinians and the consequences of these forced migrations. We will study multiple strategies of resistance, including various approaches to acting as witnesses, to official and unofficial forms of repression. Witnessing approaches include litigation, reporting, film-making, religious practices, the creation of art, accompaniment, and non-violent direct action. For final projects, students will serve as witnesses to injustices experienced by people living outside the protections of state law. Students may work alone or in groups on these projects.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Classes will include discussions, student presentations and films.
REQUIREMENTS: Students are required to read assigned material, conduct independent research, lead class discussions, complete a final witnessing project related to Iraq, Colombia, or Palestine, write brief reflections on the readings and complete two 6-8 page analytical essays.

POLT 40200-01 SEMINAR SS LA
TOPIC : POLITICS OF PRISONS
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: This tutorial covers the theory and practice of punishment. We begin with justifications and critiques of the idea of punishment. In order to evaluate these theories and contemporary practice, we examine historical and current prison conditions. The last section of the course will deal with the politics of prison construction and its intersection with the politics of race in the United States.

POLT 40200-02 SEMINAR SS LA
TOPIC: FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT AND THE ACTIVE/POSITIVE PRESIDENCY
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: To explore the character and transformational Presidency of Franklin Roosevelt; to test the FDR Presidency as a model for the next US President; to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the Roosevelt Presidency.
STUDENTS: Predominantly upper-level politics majors and minors, but all interested upper-level students are invited to apply.
FORMAT AND STYLE: One seminar meeting per week, with heavy emphasis on lively class discussion.
REQUIREMENTS: Approximately ten to twelve books will be required. Three take-home essay examinations will be required.
GRADING: Traditional A-F grading will be used.

POLT 40300-01 TUTORIAL SS LA
TOPIC: EUROPEAN PARTIES AND IDEOLOGIES
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: Building on other courses, such as “Ideas and Ideologies,” this tutorial will study the tensions within political parties as they struggle to adapt their theories to the conditions of the real world. For a variety of ideological families, we will study the theoretical background first. Then we will look at contemporary parties, their platforms, politicians, factions and constituents. What compromises have they made? Which factions have dominated at different times, and what helps or hinders factions in the internal political battles? Examples will be drawn primarily from Europe, but with references to other parties around the world.
REQUIREMENTS: Two 12-15 page papers, readings, class participation

POLT 40300-02 TUTORIAL SS LA
TOPIC: DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, Muller 314, ext. 4-3508
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: Through international case studies, projects and engaged research, students will problematize development discourse, humanize the issues related to poverty and social injustice and discuss some successful initiatives for political and socio-economic change in various societies. Apart from a critical study of the existing literature and traditional “development” paradigms, the course will help students to rethink their own point of entry into the subject matter, to divine their areas of passion and to explore the question of complicities, responsibilities and capacities. Participants should be interested in developing their ability to: work as informed scholar-practitioners on social advocacy and development issues; design context-aware projects; write proposals; collaboratively execute and evaluate projects that address issues such as peace-building, poverty alleviation and democratic engineering etc.
FORMAT: Research, Discussion, Practicum
REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance, active participation, research & field work, projects, presentations & essays. Open only to those who fulfill prerequisites and are interested in the subject matter. Participants must enjoy and have a strong capacity for independent and collaborative research and writing.
GRADING: Based on fulfillment of above requirements.

POLT 40500-01 INTERNSHIPS NLA
VARIABLE CREDIT
INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.
OBJECTIVES: The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields. Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs. Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas. Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements. Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.
STUDENTS: Interested students should see Don Beachler, Muller 333, to register for an internship.
REQUIREMENTS: Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work. Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.

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U.S. Politics - 40252 - POLT 10100 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     10:00 am - 10:50 am     MWF     Smiddy Hall 112     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Juan M. Arroyo (P)


U.S. Politics - 40253 - POLT 10100 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     11:00 am - 11:50 am     MWF     Smiddy Hall 112     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Juan M. Arroyo (P)


Media and Politics - 41671 - POLT 10200 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     10:50 am - 12:05 pm     TR     Textor Hall 103     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 41672 - POLT 10200 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     2:00 pm - 2:50 pm     M     Williams Hall 219     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Discussion     Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 41674 - POLT 10200 - 03
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     3:00 pm - 3:50 pm     M     Friends Hall 309     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Discussion     Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 41675 - POLT 10200 - 04
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     3:00 pm - 3:50 pm     W     Friends Hall 309     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Discussion     Martin L L. Brownstein (P)

Media and Politics - 41676 - POLT 10200 - 05
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Discussion Schedule Type
Discussion Instructional Method
0.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     3:00 pm - 3:50 pm     F     Friends Hall 309     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Discussion     Martin L L. Brownstein (P)


Politics and Society - 42240 - POLT 12200 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Patricia M Rodriguez (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     9:00 am - 9:50 am     MWF     Williams Hall 221     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Patricia M. Rodriguez (P)E-mail


Politics and Society - 42241 - POLT 12200 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Patricia M Rodriguez (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     10:00 am - 10:50 am     MWF     Williams Hall 221     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Patricia M. Rodriguez (P)E-mail


Introduction to International Relations - 42880 - POLT 12800 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Naeem Inayatullah (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     9:25 am - 10:40 am     TR     Williams Hall 313     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Naeem Inayatullah (P)


Introduction to International Relations - 42881 - POLT 12800 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Chip P Gagnon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     10:50 am - 12:05 pm     TR     Friends Hall 304     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Chip P. Gagnon (P)


Introduction to Global Studies - 40255 - POLT 12900 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Peyi S Soyinka-Airewele (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     9:25 am - 10:40 am     TR     Textor Hall 101     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P)


Ideas and Ideologies - 40257 - POLT 14200 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Kelly L Dietz (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     12:00 pm - 12:50 pm     MWF     Friends Hall 302     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Kelly L. Dietz (P)E-mail


Ideas and Ideologies - 40258 - POLT 14200 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Kelly L Dietz (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     1:00 pm - 1:50 pm     MWF     Friends Hall 302     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Kelly L. Dietz (P)E-mail


Ideas and Ideologies - 42987 - POLT 14200 - 03
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     11:00 am - 11:50 am     MWF     Center for Natural Sciences 333     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Alexander C. Moon (P)


Honors Intermediate Seminar: Afghanistan - 43395 - POLT 20221 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts
Instructors: Naeem Inayatullah (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     1:10 pm - 2:25 pm     TR     Williams Hall 211     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Naeem Inayatullah (P)


The Holocaust - 42882 - POLT 23000 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE g: Global Perspective, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     1:10 pm - 2:25 pm     TR     Friends Hall 303     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Donald W. Beachler (P)


Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties - 42885 - POLT 30300 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     2:35 pm - 3:50 pm     TR     Friends Hall 301     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Beth E. Harris (P)


Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties - 42886 - POLT 30300 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, GE h: Historical Perspective, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     4:00 pm - 5:15 pm     TR     Friends Hall 301     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Beth E. Harris (P)


U.S. Foreign Policy - 42887 - POLT 30600 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     4:00 pm - 5:15 pm     TR     Williams Hall 221     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Donald W. Beachler (P)


European Politics - 40318 - POLT 33000 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     2:00 pm - 2:50 pm     MWF     Friends Hall 302     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Juan M. Arroyo (P)


Latin American Politics
- 42242 - POLT 33100 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Patricia M Rodriguez (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     1:00 pm - 1:50 pm     MWF     Williams Hall 211     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Patricia M. Rodriguez (P)E-mail


Crossing Borders/Global Migration - 42883 - POLT 33500 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Chip P Gagnon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     1:10 pm - 2:25 pm     TR     Williams Hall 202     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Chip P. Gagnon (P)


Politics of Memory - 42884 - POLT 33700 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Peyi S Soyinka-Airewele (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     2:35 pm - 3:50 pm     TR     Friends Hall 304     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P)


ST: POLITICS OF SECURITY IN EAST ASIA: CHINA, TAIWAN, THE KOREAS AND JAPAN - 42245 - POLT 34003 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Kelly L Dietz (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     4:00 pm - 5:15 pm     MW     Friends Hall 301     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Kelly L. Dietz (P)E-mail


ST: VARIETIES OF CONSERVATISM - 41681 - POLT 35000 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     1:00 pm - 1:50 pm     MWF     Williams Hall 221     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Alexander C. Moon (P)


Environmental Politics - 40319 - POLT 36600 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Thomas C Shevory (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     4:00 pm - 5:15 pm     MW     Friends Hall 309     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Thomas C. Shevory (P)


Environmental Politics - 42416 - POLT 36600 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: GE 1: Self & Society, Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Thomas C Shevory (P)
Ithaca Campus
Lecture Schedule Type
Lecture Format Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     5:25 pm - 6:40 pm     MW     Friends Hall 309     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Lecture     Thomas C. Shevory (P)


Sem: Political Implications of the Holocaust - 40320 - POLT 40100 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     4:00 pm - 6:30 pm     W     Williams Hall 317     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Seminar     Donald W. Beachler (P)


Sem: Witnessing Occupation and Displacement: Colombia, Iraq and Palestine - 40321 - POLT 40100 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Beth E Harris (P)
Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     6:50 pm - 9:20 pm     W     Friends Hall 309     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Seminar     Beth E. Harris (P)


SEM: POLITICS OF PRISONS - 40322 - POLT 40200 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Alexander C Moon (P)
Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     6:50 pm - 9:20 pm     M     Friends Hall 202     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Seminar     Alexander C. Moon (P)


SEM: FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT AND THE ACTIVE/POSITIVE PRESIDENCY - 42879 - POLT 40200 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Martin L L Brownstein (P)
Ithaca Campus
Seminar Schedule Type
Seminar Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     6:50 pm - 9:20 pm     W     Friends Hall 202     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Seminar     Martin L L. Brownstein (P)


TUT: EUROPEAN PARTIES AND IDEOLOGIES
- 40323 - POLT 40300 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Juan M Arroyo (P)
Ithaca Campus
Tutorial Schedule Type
Tutorial Instructional Method
3.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     4:00 pm - 6:30 pm     M     Instructor's Office OFFC     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Tutorial     Juan M. Arroyo (P)


TUT: DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION
- 42888 - POLT 40300 - 02
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Liberal Arts, Social Sciences
Instructors: Peyi S Soyinka-Airewele (P)
Ithaca Campus
Tutorial Schedule Type
Tutorial Instructional Method
1.000 TO 4.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     4:00 pm - 6:30 pm     R     Instructor's Office OFFC     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Tutorial     Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P)


Internship: Politics - 41963 - POLT 40500 - 01
Associated Term: Spring 2009
Registration Dates: Nov 03, 2008 to Jan 26, 2009
Levels: Undergraduate
Attributes: Non-Liberal Arts
Instructors: Donald W Beachler (P)
Ithaca Campus
Internship Schedule Type
Internship Instructional Method
1.000 TO 12.000 Credits
View Catalog Entry
Scheduled Meeting Times Type     Time     Days     Where     Date Range     Schedule Type     Instructors
Class     TBA           TBA     Jan 20, 2009 - May 17, 2009     Internship     Donald W. Beachler (P)


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