Courses: Previous Semesters

Courses Spring 2010

 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS

 

The curriculum is designed to give students an understanding of political organization and political forces in modern society, to provide knowledge and a basis for insight and judgment on the problems involved in the relationship of the individual to government and of governments to one another. Students are prepared for the intelligent performance of the functions of citizenship, for careers in public service, foreign relations, teaching at the secondary level, the study of law and for study at the graduate level.

 

[for course times and locations see below]

 

POLT 10100-01, 02 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Juan Arroyo, Muller 308, Ext. 4-3969

ENROLLMENT: 25 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: Institutions, processes, and cultural/ideological roots of U.S. politics. We begin by studying a framework of ideologies that will help us to understand the political-economic institutions that have evolved to reflect the conditions of U.S. society: Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, judiciary, parties, interest groups, media, and the electoral process. Throughout, we will constantly ask: how democratic is this place? What are your criteria for measuring democracy? Students will be invited to consider how money affects the ability of citizens to influence the political process. Analysis of specific policies may include social security, abortion, health care, taxes, civil liberties, foreign policy, etc.

STUDENTS: Open to all students.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Discussion/lecture

REQUIREMENTS: Readings, active participation in class discussions, 2-3 short papers (3-5 pages), 1 medium paper (5-7 pages), final paper (7-10 pages)

 

POLT 10100-03 U.S. POLITICS SS LA 1b h

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258

ENROLLMENT: 22

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES. This course has three main purposes. In ascending order of importance, it seeks to familiarize students with the role of voters, interest groups, the media, and parties in the American political system. We will examine the dynamics of American political institutions and (some of) the origins of (some of) the current political cleavages in the U.S.; it will examine the gap between the ideals and practices of American politics.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture/discussion

 

POLT 10200-01 and 02-06 MEDIA AND POLITICS SS LA

You must enroll in Section 01 (Lecture) as well as one discussion section (02-06)

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544

ENROLLMENT: Lecture of 75 with 5 discussion sections of 15 students each

PREREQUISITE: None

OBJECTIVES: 1. To understand the symbiotic, mutually reinforcing nature of the relationship of governmental institutions and institutions of mass media. 2. To explore the myth of the adversary relationship between the press and the public order. 3. To see how issues of public policy are presented to mass audiences in terms of symbolic valence. 4. To comprehend the ways in which elections are influenced by media. 5. To explain the salient differences in method of news presentation by alternative media sources; to see how differing methods produce different outlooks. 6. To learn how governmental regulation of electronic media is qualitatively different from the forms of regulation imposed on print media; to understand the results of that difference. 7. To identify alternative forms of governmental regulation of public media in other nations. 8. To assess the relevance of this course material for the future of American democracy, for future prospects for citizen participation in public life, and for personal development; to ask "So What?" 9. To understand that political disputation and argument are integral to political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse, to know that everybody is biased, and properly so. 10. To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding--and great fun!

STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines at Ithaca College are encouraged to take this course. Students from Communications are especially welcomed, as are students from Business and all Humanities and Sciences departments. Seniors, juniors, sophomores and first-year students are all invited to apply for this course. NOTE: This course does not meet any specific Politics Department distributional requirements.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Two lectures, and one discussion class per week, and student involvement is actively sought. This course will make extensive use of films and other video materials.

REQUIREMENTS: Course requirements include approximately five books, the daily reading of The New York Times, attention to at least one weekly periodical magazine of political opinion, and at least one daily television news program. Three take-home papers are required, and these may be rewritten so that students may be afforded the chance to learn from their errors. Most fundamentally, students are expected to bring interest and enthusiasm into this course.

GRADING: Traditional A, B, C, D, F grading will be used.

 

POLT 12200-01, 02 POLITICS AND SOCIETY SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 25 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: This introductory course explores the impact of social forces and societal dynamics on politics of diverse countries, as well as the influence of politics and the state on society. The course is structured as a series of questions that address the main themes of the course and current world events: democracy and democratic breakdown, sources and consequences of state power, reasons and consequences of revolutionary action, impact of citizen activism in global and national political and economic issues, and the role of international actors in reconstructing governments. In the process of examining these issues we will also learn about the history and political events in a variety of countries, such as Chile, North Korea, Russia, Venezuela, Sudan, China, and others. Students will be learning and analyzing current world political events that are not so well covered in the mainstream media.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion, films/speakers

GRADING: short opinion papers, exams, discussion & presentations

 

POLT 12800-01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SS LA 1b, g

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Chip Gagnon, Muller 324, Ext. 4-1103

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: We examine and discuss issues of security ranging from security of the state to security of individuals. Issues include the future of war, terrorism, the global economy, nationalism, ethnic and religious conflict, and the role of the media in how we think about the international. We also study how different perspectives lead us to see different worlds, looking specifically at realism, liberalism, global humanism, and theories of identity.

STUDENTS: Open to all.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussions, films.

REQUIREMENTS: Attendance and participation in class discussions; readings for each class; three take-home exam essays.

GRADING: Standard, based on above requirements.

 

POLT 12900-01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES SS LA 1b G

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller, ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT: 30 per section

PREREQUISITES: None

OBJECTIVES: The course will expose participants to critical global challenges such as the protection of human security in a competitive marketplace; questions of sovereignty and state violence; and globalization and its socio-political and economic consequences. It will foster critical thinking and writing skills and provide fundamental analytical frames through which students can address on-going debates on representation, identity, eurocentrism and global histories. We will also seek to facilitate dialogue that engenders global citizenship and contributes to the growth of all participants.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lectures, discussions, and collaborative work.

REQUIREMENTS: Regular attendance, full participation, presentations, tests, essays and project. Open to those who are interested in the subject matter.

Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: POLT 12900, ANTH 12900, HPS 12900.

 

POLT 14100-01 POWER: RACE, SEX AND CLASS SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext. 4-3554

ENROLLMENT: 30

OBJECTIVES: We will deal with the distribution of power in the U.S. according to economic class, sex, and race hierarchies. We discuss what power is, where it comes from, where it is located. This involves the analysis of power in terms of issues of capitalism, globalism, patriarchy, and racism, as well as the specific issues they raise for policy making, persons, the family, and corporate power. The analysis will hopefully help us understand the relations of power defining black working class women, white male workers, white middle class women, etc. The premise of the course is that in order to understand capitalist society one must understand the racialized aspects of sexuality as a form of power, as well as the sexualized aspects of race. Some specific topics discussed are: the present global and national economic crisis; changing aspects of the nation-state; Bush/Cheney’s wars of/on terror; the Gulf Wars 1991-2009; the Chilean 1973 Coup; Obama’s politics of hope; the changing realities of the middle/working class; the global racialized sexual division of labor; the rise of China in the global market; the O.J. Simpson trial, and so on.

STUDENTS: Majors and non-majors alike.

REQUIREMENTS: Students will read a variety of books, and see several films. They write two 7-page analytical papers based on the course readings and films.

 

POLT 14200-01, 02 IDEAS AND IDEOLOGIES SS LA 1a, 1b

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 321, Ext. 4-3581

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

OBJECTIVES: The course explores the philosophical and ideological roots of political life and political inquiry. Through readings, film, art, music and your own observations, the course focuses on key political ideas and the ideological debates over their meaning and practice. We will examine a range of views on concepts such as liberty, equality, democracy, security, authority, and community. We will consider how these and other political ideas developed historically, why certain ideas endure, and why they remain important to understanding politics today. Ideological perspectives we will explore include liberalism and conservatism (and their “neo” variants), socialism, anarchism, and fascism. The course encourages critical reflection on aspects of political life that we take for granted. Encounters with political theories different from our own subjective views help bring to light our unconscious assumptions and also what is distinctive about our political views.

FORMAT AND STYLE: lecture and discussion

REQUIREMENTS: active participation, weekly blog, two papers and a final project

GRADING: Based on above requirements

 

POLT 29900-01 FIELD STUDY

(SEE 310-40500 INTERNSHIPS FOR FURTHER INFORMATION)

1 TO 6 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT: 5

PREREQUISITES: 310-10100, one other course in the social sciences, and permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES: Opportunity for students to explore and experience facets of political life through work experience and/or field research. Academic credit contingent upon completion of study design with departmental faculty member. (Course may not be used to satisfy 100-level distribution requirements.)

 

POLT 30100-01 LEGISLATIVE BEHAVIOR SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Martin Brownstein, Muller 307, Ext. 4-3544

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: 1. To understand those political structures that are common in legislative decisional bodies. 2. To comprehend those institutional structures which are unique to the United States Congress. 3. To learn about the processes and social interactions most crucial to the functioning of the Congress. 4. To examine executive-legislative conflicts within comparative perspective, both intra-American and international. 5. To evaluate some prominent suggestions for Congressional reform; to place the whole question of institutional change. 6. To generate a sensitive understanding of the social and psychological dynamics of legislators, both within the formal legislative arena and between legislators and constituents. 7. To develop one or more in-class legislative gaming models to aid in comprehending the social dynamics of collegial decision-making bodies; to begin a conceptualize a general theory of collegiality. 8. To simulate a model of the U.S. Senate. 9. To understand that political disputation and argument are integral to political education, that a wide variety of political beliefs is both legitimate and necessary for constructive public discourse; to know that everybody is biased, and properly so. 10. To reaffirm my sense that the study of politics is both intellectually rewarding--and great fun.

STUDENTS: Politics majors of upper-class status; other social science majors (history, sociology, economics, etc.): communications majors, business majors. This is a course for students with sophomore status or beyond. This course is a particularly useful one to take for students who are contemplating field work or internship in Washington, D.C. during the summer of 2010.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Two classes per week with the class tending more towards the discussion mode than the lecture mode. A major part of this course will involve an extended legislative simulation or game, with each student role-playing a specific U.S. Senator throughout the semester.

REQUIREMENTS: 1. A genuine interest in politics, or a genuine desire to learn. 2. Regular attendance at classes. 3. Careful reading of all course materials, to be completed by the dates assigned. 4. Daily reading of The New York Times. 5. Four papers. 6. Participation in an extended game model of the U.S. Senate.

GRADING: Standard A, B, C, D, and F grades will be used.

 

POLT 30300-01, 02 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext: 4-3517

ENROLLMENT: 28 per section

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: Throughout this course we will attempt to come to terms with the content, character and role of constitutional norms in modern America. Our studies typically will begin with significant Supreme Court decisions, but we also will examine the broader political and social conflicts, debates and cultural practices involving the basic rights. We will give attention to the role of race, class, gender and citizenship in the scope of the judicial protection of rights. Our inquiry will focus on two general categories of constitutionally authorized civil liberties: 1) the right of suspected criminals to due process, and 2) the rights to belief, expression, religion and association.

STUDENTS: Primarily politics and legal studies majors, but open to all who meet prerequisites.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Students will discuss significant Supreme Court decisions and supplementary readings. Students will develop and present group projects that explore legal debates and analyze the significance of constitutional doctrine in political conflicts. Students must be willing to prepare for class by briefing cases, participate in class discussions, and work in groups outside of the class period to prepare group projects.

REQUIREMENTS: Texts will include a casebook of Supreme Court opinions, a text concerning judicial review of anti-terrorism policies, and A Promise of Justice, by David Protess and Rob Warden.

GRADING: Grades will be based on open-note exams, essays and in-class presentations.

 

POLT 30600-01 US FOREIGN POLICY LA SS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITE: Three courses in the social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVE:

The course will include an historical overview of U.S. Foreign Policy, but is focused on contemporary issues such as the war with Al Qaeda, the occupation of Iraq, and U.S. Middle East policy. Attention will be paid to the politics of intervention in cases of genocide. We will also consider the normative issues surrounding the cost and consequences of being a super-power/empire.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and Discussion

REQUIREMENTS: Read 5-6 book and assigned articles. There will be a Two exams (mid-term and a final exam) and a research paper.

GRADING: Letter or SDU

 

POLT 33100-01 LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Patricia Rodriguez, Muller 312, Ext. 4-5714

ENROLLMENT: 28

OBJECTIVES: This course examines the contemporary politics of Latin America through the lens of the manner in which democratic processes have occurred in recent years, and the problems and promises of historical, cultural, socio-economic, and political development patterns. The past and current role of governmental institutions, political parties, electoral rules, the military, revolutionary groups, and citizens in channeling political action and policies will be examined throughout the course. We will analyze in great depth the impact of the Latin American leftist governments in Bolivia, Brazil, and Venezuela, the actions of embattled presidents and political parties in South America, violent and non-violent reactions to political and economic trends in Argentina, Colombia and Honduras, and consider the influence and problems with US foreign policy toward Central and South America.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture, discussion, speakers/films

GRADING: research paper, opinion papers, group and individual presentations.

 

POLT 34003-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN CP/IR SS LA

TOPIC: POLITICS OF SECURITY IN EAST ASIA: CHINA, TAIWAN, THE KOREAS AND JAPAN

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Kelly Dietz, Muller 321, ext. 4-3581

ENROLLMENT: 28

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences.

OBJECTIVES: This course will investigate contested notions and practices related to security in the East Asian context. As a central theme of national politics and international relations, ‘security’ is typically a taken-for-granted concept used to analyze and/or justify state-centric military and political actions. This course takes a broad view of security as an historically contested and multi-dimensional component of all social relationships. We will examine cases of popular struggles and social change in China, Taiwan, the Koreas and Japan as a way of understanding how different conceptions of security form and get expressed at the individual, community, national and inter/transnational scales. Through this lens, we will also consider how security issues become ‘nationalized’ and how broader conceptions of security become intertwined with and marginalized by dominant notions of ‘security problems’. Cases will include clandestine resistance to internet controls in China; popular efforts to reunite North and South Korea; anti-US military base struggles in (and across) South Korea, Okinawa, and Japan; autonomist struggles in China and Japan; grassroots ties between Taiwan and China; mobilization by former military sex slaves (so-called ‘comfort women’) in Korea; labor unrest in China; transnational environmental efforts; nationalist disputes over islands in the South China Sea and Sea of Japan; and popular resistance in Japan to the ‘securitization of society’ in the context of the ‘war on terror’.

FORMAT AND STYLE: lecture and discussion

REQUIREMENTS: active participation, student presentations, two papers and a final project

GRADING: Based on above requirements

 

POLT 34007-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN CP/IR SS LA

TOPIC: THE EUROPEAN UNION: PROCESS AND POLITICS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Juan M. Arroyo, Muller 308, ext. 4-3969

ENROLLMENT: 24

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences.

OBJECTIVES: Exploration and discussion of the European Union on many levels. First we consider the origins and the changing scope of the EU. At first, the link the European citizen was distant, at best. Now there are formal democratic procedures that involve European citizens (parties and elections), but much controversy about a “democratic deficit.” There is a on-going struggle over the definition of European identity. What can be the basis for this aspect of unity? The case of Turkey as possible future member of the EU will be considered.

The European Union is a supranational institution with real authority over its members. How does it work? The course will look at the design of the institutions, weighing the democratic ideals and the messier reality.

What does it do? We will look in-depth at specific policies adopted by the EU on issues such as immigration, the open market, the environment, etc. Throughout the course we will consider the reactions of the member states to the policies of an EU that they belong to.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture and discussion.

REQUIREMENTS: Readings; participation in class discussions; class presentation. Three medium (about 8-10 pages) papers.

 

POLT 34300-01 FEMINIST THEORY(ies) SS LA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Zillah Eisenstein, Muller 316, Ext 4-3554

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITES: you need to be at least a sophomore

OBJECTIVES: This course introduces and then explores the multiple meanings and varieties of feminisms. In order to do this we also interrogate the very meanings and multiplicities of sex and gender and race. We start with clarifying several forms of ‘western feminisms’ and then critically compare these strains to feminisms defined by women of color—African American, Chicana/Mexicana, inside the US. The course also examines feminisms in Eastern Europe and feminisms in several Arab and/or Muslim countries. The course will end with an examination of feminisms in the Afghan and Iraq wars. Students are asked to assess the similarities and the differences that exist within each feminism and between them and to query whether feminism is inherently ‘western’ as it so often is thought to be, or rather, a more complex mix of global and cultural and economic flows.

 

POLT 35000-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY SS LA

Topic: CAPITALISM AND ECOLOGY

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Naeem Inayatullah, Muller 325, Ext. 43028.

ENROLLMENT: 25

PREREQUISITE: Interest

OBJECTICES

Many ecologists unknowingly make two assumptions that undermine their commitments and weaken the power of the ecological movement. First, they ignore the question of “who can speak for nature?” They assume either that Nature speaks transparently and therefore that it is easy for humans to translate Nature’s messages. Or, that ecologists themselves can straightforwardly and accurately speak for Nature. Both of these moves avoid the complexity of politics.

 

Second, most ecologists either disregard or disparage the role of capitalism in what they think of us as our planet’s ecological crisis. Even when ecologists address capitalism, they claim that ecological problems result from capitalism’s obsession with continuous technological innovation, wealth creation, and profit taking. This accusation contains a powerful insight. Nevertheless, most ecologists undervalue how wealth can serve to protect humans from Nature’s indifference (and perhaps malice) towards its species.

 

At the center of this course is a critical examination of the relationship between humans and Nature. We ask the following questions: Where do humans fit into Nature? What roles do humans have in Nature’s process and purposes? What is the relationship between the values of the ecological movement and the values of capitalism? How are the two antagonistic? How might they be complimentary? How might wealth creation change by taking ecology seriously? How might the ecological movement benefit by better understanding the human need for wealth?

 

The purpose of this course is to deepen an appreciation of the social, philosophical, and political problems at the core of the ecological movement. Without attention to these problems ecological activism will likely come to little.

 

Possible books include:

 

STUDENTS: Open to all who meet the prerequisites.

 

POLT 36600-01 ENVIRONMENTAL POLTICS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Alex Moon, Muller 308, Ext. 4-1258

ENROLLMENT: 33

OBJECTIVES: Course considers an array of environmental topics from multiple political perspectives: feminist environmentalism, environmental justice, climate change, food and agriculture, water scarcity, radical action, species depletion. Course topics will be connected to screenings and events connected to the Finger Lakes Environmental Film Festival. Possible texts include:Eric Klinenberg, Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster, Kimberly Smith, African-American Environmental Thought, Michael Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, Craig Rosebraugh, Burning Rage of a Dying Planet: Speaking for the Earth Liberation Front. Tom Shevory, Toxic Burn, Kenneth Murchison, The Snail Darter Case.

FORMAT: Class will consist of reading, lecture, and class discussion. Four papers on class readings will be required.

 

POLT 40100-01 SEMINAR in CP/IR SS LA

TOPIC: POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE HOLOCAUST

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and three courses in social sciences or the equivalent

OBJECTIVES: The seminar will explore portions of the voluminous literature on the Holocaust to extract implications for politics. Among the topics to be considered are the conditions that permit people to participate in genocide and the human capacity for self-deception that enables people to rationalize their actions. This section of the seminar will consider the controversy raised by Daniel Goldhagen’s book Hitler’s Willing Executioners. We will also explore the academic politics of Holocaust studies by reading works that both proclaim the uniqueness of the Holocaust and by considering authors who argue that too much attention has been paid the Holocaust to the neglect of other historical instances of genocide. The ethical lessons that can be gleaned from global indifference to the destruction of the European Jews will form another segment of the seminar. The global response to atrocities in Rwanda and Bosnia will be included for comparative purposes.

STUDENTS: Juniors and Seniors

FORMAT AND STYLE: The seminar will employ a discussion format

REQUIREMENTS: Five to six short papers; read 8- 10 books; regular class attendance and participation

GRADING: Standard

 

POLT 40101-01 SEMINAR IN CP/IR SS LA

TOPIC: WITNESS TO WAR, OCCUPATION AND DISPLACEMENT: PALESTINE, COLOMBIA, IRAQ

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Beth Harris, Muller 310, Ext. 4-3517

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or equivalent; permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES: This course will explore the role of law in administering the U.S. government’s occupation of Iraq and Israeli government’s occupation of Palestine. We will also examine U.S., Israeli and Colombian policies that have contributed to the creation of large refugee and internally displaced populations of Iraqis, Colombians and Palestinians and the consequences of these forced migrations. We will study multiple strategies of resistance, including various approaches to acting as witnesses, to official and unofficial forms of repression. Witnessing approaches include litigation, reporting, film-making, religious practices, the creation of art, accompaniment, and non-violent direct action. For final projects, students will serve as witnesses to injustices experienced by people living outside the protections of state law. Students may work alone or in groups on these projects.

FORMAT AND STYLE: Classes will include discussions, student presentations and films.

REQUIREMENTS: Students are required read assigned material, conduct independent research, lead class discussions, complete a final witnessing project related to Iraq, Colombia, or Palestine, write brief reflections on the readings and complete two 6-8 page analytical essays.

 

POLT 40102-01 SEMINAR: COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES LA SS

TOPIC: CATHOLICS AND POLITICS

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: J. M. Arroyo, Muller 308, ext. 4-3969

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: The Catholic Church is against abortion and supports the free market. It is also against the death penalty and supports labor unions. So is the Catholic Church liberal or conservative or something else? This seminar will examine the Catholic Church as a complex political actor in various contexts. What are the possibilities for and limits of Church influence in advancing its social and economic doctrine?

The course will start with the Church’s conceptual approach to the separation of church and state, before moving on to economic doctrine as developed in the late 19th century. We will then look more specifically at the interaction of Church and politics in Europe and the US, with commentary on other world regions. Key topics will include the Church’s relationship to Fascism and Communism, and the evolution of Christian Democracy in Europe. The Church’s relationship to secularism, and to the Jewish and Muslim worlds will be addressed in the context of contemporary European politics. We will discuss the positions of the Church in the US, from the time of the Know-Nothings to the progressives of the early 1900s. Roosevelt’s New Deal Coalition included a large Catholic base, which turned increasingly to the Republicans in the 1970s and 1980s. What changes in demographics and in ideological priorities were responsible for this shift? However, in the 1980s the US bishops came out strongly against US nuclear missile deployment and against Reaganomics. Finally, Vatican II set the stage for a different interpretation of the Church’s role in politics and policy, especially with regard to the poor. Liberation Theology emerged in Latin America to develop this thinking into a call for the Church’s active intervention to change repressive social and economic structures. This has led to Vatican disciplinary action against its own priests. Is there a contradiction here?

FORMAT AND STYLE: Some lecture and much discussion.

REQUIREMENTS: Reading; participation in class discussions; class presentation. Two medium (about 15 pages) papers.

 

POLT 40103-01 SEMINAR: COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES LA SS

TOPIC: TRANSATIONAL AFRICA

3 CREDITS

INSTRUCTOR: Peyi Soyinka-Airewele, 314 Muller, ext. 4-3508

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences or the equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: Study of the effervescent transnationalization of African communities in America and the complex cross-currents and connections of old and new Diaspora, continental and transnational experiences. Our themes embrace the real life experiences of Africans in an age of globalization and an exploration of how race, ethnicity, religion, gender and class shape the assertion of African and black identities. We will follow the trail of transnational Africa in music, cinema, religion, literature, exile, migrations, chattel slavery, identity redefinition and community building, through and beyond Obama politics. Our effort to re-conceptualize transnational Africa, to complicate its issues, narratives and experiences cannot take place only within our classroom setting. All participants must be prepared to engage in a range of activities outside our formal classroom. The course draws from Okome and Vaughan’s ongoing work on Transnational Africa.

FORMAT: Discussion, guest lectures, and participation in local events.

STUDENTS: Open only to those who fulfill prerequisites and are very interested in the subject matter.

GRADING: Based on attendance, active participation, field work, essays, projects and discussion facilitation.

 

POLT 40500-01 INTERNSHIPS NLA

VARIABLE CREDIT

INSTRUCTOR: Don Beachler, Muller 333, Ext. 4-1249

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: Permission of instructor and three courses in social sciences or equivalent.

OBJECTIVES: The Politics Department offers a wide variety of internship opportunities for students in different fields. Faculty will work with students to find internships that meet their needs. Internships are available in Ithaca and the surrounding areas. Internship/Field Study can be used to meet both 300 and 400 level requirements. Possible internship sites include: Tompkins County Environmental Management Council; Citizen's Environmental Coalition; Offender Aid and Restoration (working with jail inmates); Planned Parenthood; Assemblyman Marty Luster; Congressman Maurice Hinchey; Community Dispute Resolution Agency; Dispositional Alternatives (Youth Bureau); Red Cross; Human Services Coalition; Mayor's Office; City Attorney's Office; Prisoner's Legal Services; Loaves and Fishes; Alternatives Credit Union; Women's Community Center; Cornell Environmental Law Society; Eco-Justice Task Force; City of Ithaca, Dept. of Planning and Development; Tompkins County Planning Department; Tompkins County Solid Waste Management Division; Rune Hill Earth Awareness School; New York Public Interest Research Group; Science Center; Battered Women Task Force; GIAC; Downtown Business Council; Day Care Council; Human Rights Commission.

STUDENTS: Interested students should see Tom Shevory, Muller 315, to register for an internship.

REQUIREMENTS: Students receive one hour credit for every 60 hours of internship-related work. Students are required to keep a journal and undertake internship-oriented research and writing.

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Politics courses Spring 2010: Schedule

Politics Select CRN Subj Crse Sec Cmp Cred Title Days Time Cap Act Rem XL Cap XL Act XL Rem Instructor Date (MM/DD) Location Attribute NR 40227 POLT 10100 01 ITH 3.000 U.S. Politics MWF 09:00 am-09:50 am 25 0 25 0 0 0 Juan M. Arroyo (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 207 GE 1: Self & Society and GE h: Historical Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 40228 POLT 10100 02 ITH 3.000 U.S. Politics MWF 10:00 am-10:50 am 25 0 25 0 0 0 Juan M. Arroyo (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 207 GE 1: Self & Society and GE h: Historical Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43348 POLT 10100 03 ITH 0.000/3.000 U.S. Politics TR 10:50 am-12:05 pm 22 0 22 0 0 0 Alexander C. Moon (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 302 GE 1: Self & Society and GE h: Historical Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41518 POLT 10200 01 ITH 3.000 Media and Politics TR 10:50 am-12:05 pm 75 0 75 0 0 0 Martin L L. Brownstein (P) 01/25-05/14 PARK AUD Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41519 POLT 10200 02 ITH 0.000 Media and Politics M 03:00 pm-03:50 pm 15 0 15 0 0 0 Martin L L. Brownstein (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 102 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41521 POLT 10200 03 ITH 0.000 Media and Politics W 03:00 pm-03:50 pm 15 0 15 0 0 0 Martin L L. Brownstein (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 210 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41522 POLT 10200 04 ITH 0.000 Media and Politics M 12:00 pm-12:50 pm 15 0 15 0 0 0 Martin L L. Brownstein (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 102 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41523 POLT 10200 05 ITH 0.000 Media and Politics W 12:00 pm-12:50 pm 15 0 15 0 0 0 Martin L L. Brownstein (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 102 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43342 POLT 10200 06 ITH 0.000/3.000 Media and Politics M 05:25 pm-06:15 pm 15 0 15 0 0 0 Martin L L. Brownstein (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 102 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41903 POLT 12200 01 ITH 3.000 Politics and Society MWF 10:00 am-10:50 am 25 0 25 0 0 0 Patricia M. Rodriguez (P) 01/25-05/14 CNS 118 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41904 POLT 12200 02 ITH 3.000 Politics and Society MWF 11:00 am-11:50 am 25 0 25 0 0 0 Patricia M. Rodriguez (P) 01/25-05/14 CNS 118 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 42350 POLT 12800 01 ITH 3.000 Introduction to International Relations MWF 11:00 am-11:50 am 28 0 28 0 0 0 Chip P. Gagnon (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 309 GE 1: Self & Society and GE g: Global Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 42351 POLT 12800 02 ITH 3.000 Introduction to International Relations MWF 12:00 pm-12:50 pm 28 0 28 0 0 0 Chip P. Gagnon (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 309 GE 1: Self & Society and GE g: Global Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 40229 POLT 12900 01 ITH 3.000 Introduction to Global Studies TR 09:25 am-10:40 am 30 0 30 0 0 0 Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 207 GE 1: Self & Society and GE g: Global Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43346 POLT 12900 02 ITH 3.000 Introduction to Global Studies TR 10:50 am-12:05 pm 30 0 30 0 0 0 Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 207 GE 1: Self & Society and GE g: Global Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43347 POLT 14100 01 ITH 3.000 Power: Race, Sex, and Class TR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm 30 0 30 0 0 0 Zillah R. Eisenstein (P) 01/25-05/14 WILL 211 GE 1: Self & Society and GE g: Global Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 40230 POLT 14200 01 ITH 3.000 Ideas and Ideologies MWF 12:00 pm-12:50 pm 28 0 28 0 0 0 Kelly L. Dietz (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 207 GE 1: Self & Society and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 40231 POLT 14200 02 ITH 3.000 Ideas and Ideologies MWF 01:00 pm-01:50 pm 28 0 28 0 0 0 Kelly L. Dietz (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 207 GE 1: Self & Society and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43380 POLT 22001 01 ITH 3.000 Honors Intermediate Seminar TR 01:10 pm-02:25 pm 20 0 20 0 0 0 Alexander C. Moon (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 301 GE 1: Self & Society and GE g: Global Perspective and GE h: Historical Perspective and Liberal Arts NR 42359 POLT 29900 01 ITH 1.000-6.000 Field Study: Politics   TBA 5 0 5 0 0 0 Donald W. Beachler (P) 01/25-05/14 TBA Non-Liberal Arts NR 43351 POLT 30100 01 ITH 3.000 Legislative Behavior TR 02:35 pm-03:50 pm 28 0 28 0 0 0 Martin L L. Brownstein (P) 01/25-05/14 BUS 104 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 42355 POLT 30300 01 ITH 3.000 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties TR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm 28 0 28 0 0 0 Beth E. Harris (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 309 GE 1: Self & Society and GE h: Historical Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 42356 POLT 30300 02 ITH 3.000 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties TR 02:35 pm-03:50 pm 28 0 28 0 0 0 Beth E. Harris (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 309 GE 1: Self & Society and GE h: Historical Perspective and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 42357 POLT 30600 01 ITH 3.000 U.S. Foreign Policy TR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm 28 0 28 0 0 0 Donald W. Beachler (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 207 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41905 POLT 33100 01 ITH 3.000 Latin American Politics MWF 02:00 pm-02:50 pm 28 0 28 0 0 0 Patricia M. Rodriguez (P) 01/25-05/14 TBA Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41907 POLT 34003 01 ITH 3.000 ST: Pol of Scrty in East Asia MW 04:00 pm-05:15 pm 25 0 25 0 0 0 Kelly L. Dietz (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 309 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43356 POLT 34007 01 ITH 3.000 ST: European Union MWF 01:00 pm-01:50 pm 24 0 24 0 0 0 Juan M. Arroyo (P) 01/25-05/14 CNS 115 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43350 POLT 34300 01 ITH 3.000 Feminist Theory TR 01:10 pm-02:25 pm 25 0 25 0 0 0 Zillah R. Eisenstein (P) 01/25-05/14 CNS 119 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41524 POLT 35000 01 ITH 3.000 ST: Capitalism & Ecology TR 05:25 pm-06:40 pm 25 0 25 0 0 0 Naeem Inayatullah (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 207 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 40290 POLT 36600 01 ITH 3.000 Environmental Politics TR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm 33 0 33 0 0 0 Alexander C. Moon (P) 01/25-05/14 WILL 313 GE 1: Self & Society and Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 40291 POLT 40100 01 ITH 3.000 Sem: Pol Impl of the Holocaus W 04:00 pm-06:30 pm 15 0 15 0 0 0 Donald W. Beachler (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 209 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43490 POLT 40101 01 ITH 3.000 Sem: Dsplcmnt: Col, Irq & Pal T 06:50 pm-09:20 pm 15 0 15 0 0 0 Beth E. Harris (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 102 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43491 POLT 40102 01 ITH 3.000 Sem: Catholics & Politics M 04:00 pm-06:30 pm 10 0 10 0 0 0 Juan M. Arroyo (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 104 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 43492 POLT 40103 01 ITH 3.000 Sem: Transnational Africa W 03:00 pm-05:30 pm 10 0 10 0 0 0 Peyi S. Soyinka-Airewele (P) 01/25-05/14 FRND 102 Liberal Arts and Social Sciences NR 41757 POLT 40500 01 ITH 1.000-12.000 Internship: Politics   TBA 5 0 5 0 0 0 Donald W. Beachler (P) 01/25-05/14 TBA Non-Liberal Arts NR 42933 POLT 49900 01 ITH 1.000-5.000 Directed Study: Politics   TBA 1 0 1 0 0 0 TBA 01/25-05/14 TBA Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

 

 

 

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