Courses: Current and Upcoming

Next Semester Courses

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY
Spring 2015 Courses

*All courses are 3 credits except where noted*
(course descriptions will be updated as information becomes available)
 

We have an interest in providing experience that permits students to examine social forms of life, and at the same time explore their values and beliefs. One of our interests is to help students begin to participate in the public domain. We will do this by assisting students in identifying coursework, internships, research, and other intentional experiments that can provide the fundamental theoretical and research tools for roles in intervention.

SOCI 10100-01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (THEME: POWER & JUSTICE) LA SS 1
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM (01); MWF 12:00-12:50 PM (02)
INSTRUCTOR: Bhavani Arabandi, Muller 111, Ext. 4-7024, barabandi@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30 students per section
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To understand the relations between our personal lives (biography) and history through the exploration of the sociological imagination. To see the ways our lives and history intersect within a society and have different consequences depending on our position within that society. This kind of study has been called "a terrible and a magnificent lesson." By looking at the development of and the major theoretical perspectives within sociology, we will focus these "lessons" on various forms of oppression, crime, race/ethnicity, work, war, intimacy, gender, inequality, health, families and "deviance."
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Your grade will be based upon your papers, examinations and participation.

SOCI 10100-03 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY LA SS 1
TR 9:25-10:40 AM
INSTRUCTOR: Julian Euell, Muller 114, Ext. 4-3522, euell@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Basic concepts related to an integral sociology that explores the relationships between the interior of the individual and the exterior practices and behaviors of individuals as understood by social science. The interior of groups as exhibited in language, codes symbols, representations and beliefs, and the exterior of social systems, as institutions in economies, technology, and recurring structural processes. We will use film and other media as the basis for this quest.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students will be expected to engage in projects of sentepensante- those that emphasize the harmonic, complementary relationship between the sentir of intuition and the pensar of intellect and scholarship. For each topic students will create a project. The form of this project is entirely up to you, you can produce a video, create an art installation, stage a performance or event, curate and critically annotate an online alternative cultural “museum” of textual, visual, and musical objects, and so on. You are welcome to produce more traditional research papers. You will be expected to employ conceptualization and visualization to demonstrate your understanding of the basic concepts of the week.

SOCI 10100-04, -05 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY SS 1 LA
TR 1:10-2:25 PM (04); 2:35-3:50 PM (05)
INSTRUCTOR: Rebecca Plante, Muller 110, Ext. 4-3311, rplante@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30 per section
PREREQUISITES: None
STUDENTS: All are welcome; seniors should know that they will be outnumbered, however.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Objectives are: to develop tools and skills necessary for seeing 'the big picture' of how United States society is structured; how it is reproduced; and how it affects individuals. To learn how to understand ourselves within this broader society. To consider ways to challenge and change ourselves and our world.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion, every T/Th.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams and brief papers. Engaged, conscientious attendance and participation in lecture is required and will be graded. Reading and thinking is required. No electronic devices are permitted in class.

SOCI 10100-06 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY LA SS 1
MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Sarah Grunberg
ENROLLMENT: 30 students per section
PREREQUISITES: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Sociology as a field of study examines human social behavior, the causes and consequences of these social behaviors, as well as social change. Sociologists examine how social structures shape our daily interactions, while also exploring how society constructs social categories and cultural meanings.
The course will introduce the relationship between sociological perspectives and the way society is structured by investigating forms of oppression, crime, race/ethnicity, work, war, intimacy, gender, inequality, health, families and "deviance." The course encourages students to be interested in and critical of the world they live in by exploring major theoretical perspectives connected to issues and activities encountered in everyday life.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Your grade will be based upon your papers, examinations and participation.

SOCI 13000-01, -02 YOUTH AND YOUTH CULTURES (IDENTITIES THEME) 1 LA SS
MWF 9:00-9:50 AM (01); MWF 10:00-10:50 AM (02)
INSTRUCTOR: Jim Rothenberg, Muller 108, Ext. 4-1251, rothenbe@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 30 per section
PREREQUISITES: None
STUDENTS: Freshmen and sophomores only
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The transition to adulthood in western societies has become protracted, and a clearly defined social category, youth, clearly emerged after World War II. Though a transitional status, youth nonetheless has come to be a quite distinctive social category, often evincing distinctive norms and politics. In this course we focus on the forces that have shaped and are continuing to shape the current generation of youth as well as the different experiences that youth have based on variations in social class, gender, race and ethnicity. We also examine the forces that shape student life in colleges and universities and the political activities of contemporary youth.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, lecture and student presentations.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Based on the quality of assigned papers and projects..

SOCI 21400-01, 02 DEFINITIONS OF NORMALITY LA SS 1
TR 8:00-9:15 AM (01); 9:25-10:40 AM (02)
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Laskowitz, Muller 327, Ext. 4-3520, jlaskowi@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Using our sociological imagination we will be curious about what it means to be considered an outsider. We will think critically about the “social forces” and “coercions”, in particular historical moments, that define what is normal and what is not. In so doing we will reveal the power relations that define and control individuals and groups as “bad”, “mad”, “sad”, and “awe”-ful.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings, daily engagement, facilitation of readings, discussions, analytic essays, exams.

SOCI 21600-01 ALTERNATIVE CULTURE LA SS
TR 9:25-10:40 AM
INSTRUCTOR: Julian Euell, Muller 114, Ext. 4-3522, euell@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the social sciences or sophomore standing
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is a course on changing Culture. It is an exploration in Social Artistry and radicalism. Social Artistry includes imagining and a discovery of alternative individual functioning, moral agreements and alternative social structures.
We will examine Pragmatics-Practices based on human possibilities for evolution or post-conventional existence. So the series of work will be on Social Artistry and Post-conventional practice. This is a movement of consciousness not simply an oppositional voice. The first is evolutionary and is vertical movement; the second is horizontal and tends to rely upon conventional ideas of economy, politics and relationship. We will have Thursday conversations [salons] based upon the class preparations requested.
I want you to play an active role in seeking plausible alternatives in the areas of:

  • The Personal: Everyday Practices
  • The Arts in Social Artistry
  • Polities and world governance
  • Localized economies—slow food movement
  • Alternatives to Capitalism
  • Living on the Land

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students will be expected to engage in projects of sentepensante- those that emphasize the harmonic, complementary relationship between the sentir of intuition and the pensar of intellect and scholarship. For each topic above students will create a project. The form of this project is entirely up to you, you can produce a video, create an art installation, stage a performance or event, curate and critically annotate an online alternative cultural “museum” of textual, visual, and musical objects, and so on. You are welcome to produce more traditional research papers.

SOCI 21700-01 MENTAL HEALTH IN HISTORICAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS LA SS
MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Katherine Cohen-Filipic, Muller 113, Ext. 4-5122, kcohenfilipic@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course or PSYC 10300
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores the historical and contemporary contexts of mental health and distress from both sociological and psychological perspectives. Examination of the social construction of mental health through time, and consideration of how social and cultural factors such as race, class, and gender intersect with diagnostic paradigms and clinical treatment models employed by practitioners. Cross listed as PSYC 21700. Students may not receive credit for PSYC 21700 and SOCI 21700.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussions, small group activities.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: A wide variety of learning activities, including papers, presentations, exams, and class participation.

SOCI 25000-01 GENDER, THE ENVIRONMENT, AND GLOBAL CHANGE LA SS
MWF 11:00-11:50 AM
INSTRUCTOR: Alicia Swords, Muller 109, Ext. 4-1209, aswords@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One social science course
STUDENTS: This course is recommended for students who wish to explore the intersections of social and environmental issues.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores the interconnections between gender and human relations with the environment. We study the histories and contemporary realities of patriarchy, colonialism, capitalist development, globalization, and environmental crises. Authors include historians, ecologists, feminists, and social and environmental activists. Special focus is on US and international case studies of social movements that propose alternatives to current gender hierarchies and environmental degradation, including feminist, indigenous, food justice, and environmental justice movements.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, in-class interactive exercises, films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance and participation, midterm exam, reflective and analytical essays and mini-projects.

SOCI 25300-01, 02 SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS LA SS 1
MWF 10:00-10:50 AM (01); MWF 1:00-1:50 PM (02)
INSTRUCTOR: Joslyn Brenton, Muller 115, Ext. 4-7384, jbrenton@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 students per section
PREREQUISITES: One course in the social sciences
COURSE DESCRIPTION: What does it mean to be healthy? How does power shape the development of health and illness categories? In this course we will use sociological concepts and vocabulary to explore these questions. At the beginning of the course we will identify health and illness are socially produced and distributed. How can we explain, for example, why the rich tend to be relatively healthy while the poor are often sick? To answer these questions we will focus on how multiple and intersecting inequalities (e.g., race, class, gender, sexuality) shape the way people experience and negotiate health. For the remainder of the course we will focus on how ideas about health and illness are constructed, by whom, and with what consequences. The overarching goal of this course is to develop an understanding of what patterns in health and illness tell us about how societies are organized.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, group work, film, some lecture, and student-led research projects.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: A willingness to engage and become part of a learning community. This process requires your commitment to attending class, doing 100% of the reading before you come to class, and a willingness to listen, share, and develop your critical thinking skills. Students learning is gauged by reflection papers, other writing, and a final course project.

SOCI 31100-01 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY LA SS
MWF 2:00-2:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Jim Rothenberg, Muller 108, Ext. 4-1251, rothenbe@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Sociology majors or minors, SOCI-10100 and three courses in social sciences
STUDENTS: Sociology majors and minors only
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course we will study the major theoretical traditions in Sociology. Among others, we will examine the ideas of Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim, and G. H. Mead, the primary theorists on which these traditions are based. We will pose several basic questions about each approach: According to each thinker, what is the general nature of society, the individual, and the relationship between the two? What role do ideas have in shaping society? What are the prospects for human freedom and happiness? We will conclude the course with a look at current theoretical trends, including a brief examination of feminist theories.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Quizzes and papers.

SOCI 32200-01 FORMS OF PUNISHMENT SS
MW 4:00-5:15 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Laskowitz, Muller 327, Ext. 4-3520, jlaskowi@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course; two additional social science courses; sophomore standing
STUDENTS: This is a course recommended to those who are interested in the study of law, criminal and juvenile justice, counseling, social work and history. It is also for those of you who never liked being 'sent to your room', 'docked' and/or 'hit'.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We make less mysterious the origins of punishment by linking ideas about punishment to the social, political, and economic "moments" out of which they emerge. We are curious about the public spectacle of early forms of punishment: asylums, poor-houses, jails, prisons, and other non-voluntary forms of "treatment." We do not remain restricted to the study of stone walls and iron bars as the architecture of power, control, and punishment takes many surprising forms.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/lecture/student facilitation.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Lots of reading, 3 analytic essays and a final research paper. Based on quality of work and participation.

SOCI 33701-01 ST: GLOBAL RACE & ETHNICITY LA SS 1
MW 4:00-5:15 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Bhavani Arabandi, Muller 111, Ext. 4-7024, barabandi@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course; two additional social science courses
Course Description: This course uses comparative data from diverse societies to investigate how racial and ethnic identities are constructed and differences maintained. Sociological theories and concepts are introduced to understand the continuing presence of racism, prejudice, conflict, discrimination in a globalizing world, and engage with the possibility of a future post-racial society. Some of the issues that will be explored are majority-minority politics in South Africa, ethnic conflict in Bosnia or Rwanda, balkanization of Yugoslavia, debates about immigration in the United States, and cyber racism.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Readings, student-led discussion, films, and some lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Grades will be assigned based on short papers, leading discussion on assigned topics, and a final project.

SOCI 34000-01 ESSENTIAL ISSUES IN MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENT LA SS
MWF 2:00-2:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Katherine Cohen-Filipic, Muller 113, Ext. 4-5122, kcohenfilipic@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: SOCI 21700 or PSYC 21700
COURSE DESCRIPTION: A theoretical approach to counseling and treatment in long-term therapeutic settings. The prevalence and causes of issues such as substance and sexual abuse, trauma and family violence, and eating disorders, are explored, and treatment modalities are considered with attention to diversity, ethical issues, and media representation of mental health challenges.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, small group activities
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, presentations, exams, class participation

SOCI 35300-01 RESEARCH METHODS I LA SS
TR 9:25-10:40 AM
INSTRUCTOR: Stephen Sweet, Muller 107, Ext. 4-3910, ssweet@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course; two other sociology courses.
STUDENTS: Primarily sociology majors; others who need an equivalent research course.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The first half of a two-semester sequence, this course presents the methods used by sociologists to answer questions. Sociology majors should be familiar with the essential elements of social science research, so they will be well prepared for work or further education, and also so they will be informed consumers of research. After completing this course a student will be able to:

  • Describe the logic of research and theories about causation.
  • Devise a research question and do a review of relevant scholarly literature on the topic.
  • Describe and practice common methods of social science research, including observation and interviewing, survey research, content analysis, and experiments.
  • Develop group problem-solving skills using cooperative learning methods.
  • Discuss crucial controversies in social science research, including the ethics and politics of research and the possibilities for activist research.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: The course uses a textbook and a reader, which will also be used in the second semester. It involves lecture, small group exercises, projects applying the various methods (content analysis, observation, interviews, and quantitative analysis) and library research. Each student will carry out the first two stages of an original research project, to be completed in the second semester of the course sequence. The papers are a statement of the research question and a review of the literature (a major paper involving extensive use of scholarly library sources).
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Quizzes, 5 applications projects, and two papers.

SOCI 35400-01 RESEARCH METHODS II LA SS
TR 9:25-10:40 AM
INSTRUCTOR: Alicia Swords, Muller 109, Ext. 4-1209, aswords@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: SOCI 35300.
STUDENTS: Primarily sociology majors; others who need an equivalent research course.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The second half of a two-semester sequence, this course involves collecting and analyzing data from both qualitative and quantitative sources. A major part of the course is the student’s individual research project involving a proposal, data collection, data analysis, and presentation of research results. After completing this course a student will be able to:

  • Analyze existing survey data, using statistical software.
  • Prepare a research plan including protection of human subjects, instrument design, and sampling plan.
  • Collect original data, by conducting interviews or survey.
  • Analyze original data using qualitative and quantitative methods, including frequencies, percentage tables, correlations, and statistical tests.
  • Write a formal research report and present in a public symposium.
  • Demonstrate the ability to manipulate data by recoding, constructing scales or indexes, and performing bivariate analysis.
  • Understand the theory and application of probability sampling and tests of statistical significance.
  • Understand the logic of and demonstrate basic data analysis.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: The course meets in a computer lab and part of the time is spent on the individual student research projects. Students learn theory and practice and carry out a qualitative study and learn to analyze quantitative data.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Data analysis exercises, applications projects, three papers including a major research report, and a symposium presentation.

SOCI 38100-01 RACE AND THE FAMILY
TR 2:35-3:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Phuong Tran Nguyen
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the social sciences
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examines the intersection of the institutions of race and the family. Considering the extent that the average American family is defined in a racialized manner, the ways that parents are scripted teach their children of color about race and racism, how life chances are linked to racial/family ties, how race shapes family and personal identity, and the ways families of color are presented in the mainstream media. Particular emphasis is placed on racial/ethnic diversities as intersecting with concerns such as social class, family structure, and life stage positioning.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE:
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:

SOCI 40100-01 COMMUNITY ORGANIZING LA SS
TR 1:10-2:25 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Alicia Swords, Muller 109, Ext. 4-1209, aswords@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITES: One of the following courses: SOCI 20800, SOCI 20700, or SOCI 32600; senior standing.
STUDENTS: This is an upper-level seminar.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course, students learn about the theory and practice of community organizing. There are three components to the course: study of historical and contemporary community organizing, developing awareness about social realities in the communities around us, and the practice of organizing skills. Our study of organizing strategies draws from civil rights and Black Freedom movements, liberation theology, anti-racism, indigenous movements, food justice and poor peoples’ movements. We learn techniques for community organizing, including power analysis, consensus decision-making, facilitation, relationship building, networking and written and oral communication.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar, discussion, weekly participation in community activities on or off-campus for a minimum of 10 hours during the semester.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Bi-weekly reading responses and discussion questions; written reflections on observations of community workshops and organizing events; a final teach-in.

SOCI 40800-01 COUNSELING METHODS NLA
TR 2:35-3:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Katherine Cohen-Filipic, Muller 113, Ext. 4-5122, kcohenfilipic@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITES: SOCI 30800 or PSYC 34100
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Counseling Methods will help students who have a basic knowledge of counseling advance their skills by creating a conceptual framework while clarifying theoretical orientations. They will develop an integrative approach that pays attention to what clients are thinking, feeling and doing. Combining these three dimensions will be the basis for exploring counseling practice. The student will gain a comprehensive knowledge of the four primary areas of counseling: Establishing an effective therapeutic relationship, understanding assessment and goal setting, the selection and implementation of treatment strategies and evaluating the counseling process prior to termination. A balance of theory, evidence based practice, clinical instruction and engagement activities will create an optimal experience for learning.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, role plays, small group activities
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, presentations, class participation

SOCI 43702-01 ST: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES ON HEALTH LA SS 1
R 4:00-6:40 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Joslyn Brenton, Muller 115, Ext. 4-7384, jbrenton@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course; three social science courses with at least one at level 3; junior standing
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this upper-level course we will discover how different cultures around the world define health. Our journey will be guided by the following questions: What practices are thought to lead to good health? What do ideas about health (and illness) tell us about what a culture values and fears? Is good health possible to achieve in capitalist economies? To begin answering these questions we will learn about bodily and mental health practices, including consumption practices, happening around the globe. We will also embody this process of inquiry by engaging in physical exercise, mediation, and other forms of health practice in order to further explore course ideas and concepts.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: A movement toward rigorous thinking through creative play, reading, writing, group discussion, asking questions, and critical thinking exercises.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: A willingness to engage and become part of a learning community. This process requires your commitment to attending class, doing 100% of the reading before you come to class, and a willingness to listen, share, and develop critical thinking skills. Grading will be based on intensive writing exercises and other assessments we will identify together as a class.

SOCI 43802-01 ST: ADVANCED SEXUALITIES STUDIES
TR 10:50 AM-12:05 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Rebecca Plante, Muller 110, Ext. 4-3311, rplante@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITES: One 100-level sociology course; three social science courses with at least one at level 3; junior standing or above.
STUDENTS: Curious, hard-working, engaged sociology/social science and women’s & gender studies students will benefit most. Caution: this class will be quite rigorous in both reading and writing workload; the prerequisites are vital. Preparation via previous rigorous seminars/classes will be helpful.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This upper-level seminar will further students' existing academic knowledge of genders and sexualities. Together we will analyze theories and empirical studies of gender and sexual diversity, relationships, and sexualities; content will address trans/gender, intersex/uality, hegemony, cisgender, power, queer sexualities, and hetero/sex. Our focus will be North American but there will be some cross-cultural material and we will weave class, race, and ethnicity and class throughout our coursework. The course is intended to challenge and engage students, inspire sociological, structural analyses, and further advanced students' analytical skills.
COURSE FORMAT/ STYLE: Seminar style, relying on engaged participation from ALL members. Discussion and analysis-heavy. Preparation is crucial: reading, writing, and thinking prior to every class and in every week.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Reading-heavy, writing-heavy. There are no exams. Demonstrable participation, engagement, and attendance count a lot.

SOCI 43804-01 ST: BODIES: THE HUMAN POTENTIAL MOVEMENT SS LA
T 4:00-6:40 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Julian Euell, Muller 114, Ext. 4-3522, euell@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITE: One 100-level sociology course; three social science courses with at least one at level 3; junior standing or above
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Human Potential Movement (HPM) arose out of the counterculture milieu of the 1960s and formed around the concept of cultivating extraordinary potential that its advocates believed to lie largely untapped in all people. The movement took as its premise the belief that through the development of "human potential", humans can experience an exceptional quality of life filled with happiness, creativity, and fulfillment. Since that movement there has been continued research base on these premises. Also the movement towards self-actualization and societal evolution has developed into Integral life practices along with the Integral movement, and the millennial movement which advocate the convergence of technologies and biology and the development of the ‘superhuman’. We will study these movements as conceptions and as practices. This course is an inquiry into the social effects on the ideas of the good life, the beautiful mind, and the beautiful body.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING:
Students will be expected to engage in projects of sentepensante- those that emphasize the harmonic, complementary relationship between the sentir of intuition and the pensar of intellect and scholarship.
For each topic above students will create a project. The form of this project is entirely up to you, you can produce a video, create an art installation, stage a performance or event, curate and critically annotate an online alternative cultural “museum” of textual, visual, and musical objects, and so on. You are welcome to produce more traditional research papers.
 
SOCI 47601-01 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SOCIOLOGY
(Credits can vary from 1 to 4 credits, but typically students do independent study for 3 credits)
Students will NOT be able to enroll in this course during registration since they will need to submit an application first to the instructor and then to the dean’s office in H&S. Students who are interested in the class should email Jim Rothenberg in advance. We will find a regular time to meet that based on the schedules of students enrolling in this course.
Sociology majors and minors will get credit for a 400 level sociology course and they also can get credit for one of the Core Areas of Sociological Inquiry (Social Change, Inequality, Social Institutions and Organizations, or Individual, Culture, and Society). Topics for investigation do not have to fit one of these areas and students may take the course as a general 400 level sociology course. The specific course number will vary depending on which area is chosen for study.
INSTRUCTOR: Jim Rothenberg, Muller 108, Ext. 4-1251, rothenbe@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in social sciences; permission of instructor
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students choose a sociologically relevant topic of interest to themselves. Students are expected to do a sophisticated exploration and analysis of their topics based on library research. A proposal for the topic and specific plans must be approved by the instructor early in the semester. During weekly class meetings, students share their ideas and lead discussions about their topics. Students meet individually with the instructor on a regular basis. During the second half of the semester, students read and comment on other students’ chapters.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Meet once a week as a group for discussion and presentations and meet individually with the instructor on a regular basis.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students are required to write an extensive report based on library research in their chosen topic. Grades are based on the quality of class presentations, drafts of individual sections of the paper turned in during the term, and on the overall quality of the final report.

SOCI 49801-01 INTERNSHIP IN SOCIOLOGY COURSE NLA
(Credits vary)
M 4:00-4:50 PM
INSTRUCTOR: Katherine Cohen-Filipic, Muller 113, Ext. 4-5122, kcohenfilipic@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 12
PREREQUISITES: Counseling minors and permission of instructor
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students in this course arrange for internships in local agencies. Students meet as a group each week to share their experiences and report on their progress. Students meet individually with the course professor on a regular basis to discuss their work. Internship sites should be obtained before the end of the fall semester.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Internship in local agency, including some direct work with clients, weekly internship seminar
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation in internship setting and during seminar, weekly journaling, reflective paper
 

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