List of past highlighted ICC courses:

November 17, 2014
THEA 19600 U.S. Social Activist Theatre and Performance
 

November 10, 2014
COMP10500 Introduction to Website Development
 

November 3, 2014
LNGS19405 Sex and Gender in the City
 

October 29, 2014
CNPH21400 Hollywood and American Film
 

May 19, 2014
ENGL19412 Banned Books and Censorship Trials: Obscenity in the 20th Century
 

May 12, 2014
LNGS19401 The Protagonist in French Literature: Hero and Anti-Hero in French Literature
 

May 5, 2014
ARTH20400 Visual Culture of Science
 

April 28, 2014
RLST24000 Writing about Religion: Heaven and Hell
 

April 21, 2014
OTBS20600 Culture of Disability
 

April 11, 2014
PHIL20400 Choosing Wisely
 

March 24, 2014
LNGS19403 The Novel in the Mirror: Latin American Literature on Film
 

March 10, 2014

ENGL22100 Survey of African-American Literature
 

February 24, 2014
WRTG19401 Writing the West: The Construction of Self and Other from 1492 to the Present
 

February 10, 2014
PSYC23500 Conservation Psychology: Psychology for a Sustainable World
 

January 27, 2014
JWST29400 - Contemporary Jewish Identities: Gender, Race, and Power
 

January 13, 2014
BINT21000 - Boom, Bust and the American Economic Cycle


December 9, 2013
ENGL19410 - Engendering Modernity: 20th Century Women Writers
 

Descriptions:

November 17, 2014
THEA19600 U.S. Social Activist Theatre and Performance

Themes: Power and Justice
Perspectives: Creative Arts

Theatre scholars and practitioners alike are engaged by questions of how politics and performance combine to produce or influence social change.  This course is a combination of history, theory, and praxis exploring the potential of social activist theatre and performance.   Students explore the U.S. history and defining theories of contemporary Theatre for Social Change before developing their own performances. 

Students are introduced to the constitutive elements of all theatre practice before evaluating the components, intentions, and possible efficacy of a variety of U.S. performances, engaging social issues such as racism, classism, gender and sexuality equality, and environmental concerns.   Additionally, students will be guided through the process of creating works of theatre for social change.

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November 10, 2014
COMP10500 Introduction to Website Development

Themes: The Quest for a Sustainable Future
Perspectives: Creative Arts

This course serves as an introduction to the Internet, web browsers, and using the Internet as a research resource.  Students will study web-page design techniques and concepts, and use these to develop web pages with basic HTML and more advanced features such as tables, frames, forms, and style sheets.

The coursework will include the basics of storing and displaying graphics, including file formats for graphics files, creating images for the web, and optimizing colors and size for display on browsers.  Additionally, the use of scripting languages such as JavaScript is introduced.  Prior experience using Microsoft Windows or the Mac OS is expected.

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November 3, 2014
LNGS19405 Sex and Gender in the City

Themes: Identities
Perspectives: Humanities

This course will examine the gendered dimensions of cities and how public architectural structures as well as private spaces come to be encoded with gendered meanings. The course will examine how architecture and landscape influence (or are impacted by) literary characters’ sexuality and performance of gender. 

Through the reading of carefully selected texts—written and audio-visual—students will be compelled to consider the notions of “identity” and “identity formation” throughout the course of the semester. The course work will involve constantly thinking about identity vis-à-vis one’s gender and sexuality. Students will likewise consider how it is that the spaces we occupy, primarily cities, might be understood as encoded with gender and therefore impacting the way we ourselves behave within these environments.

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October 29, 2014
CNPH21400 Hollywood and American Film

Themes: Identities and A World of Systems
Perspectives: Creative Arts and Humanities

This course focuses on the historical, economic, cultural, ideological, political, and social formations in the evolution of a wide range of American cinemas, including Hollywood, independent, experimental, and hybrid forms. Marketing and exhibition strategies are examined, as well as changing aesthetic concerns throughout different historical periods.

Topics covered include the early years and rise of Hollywood, the technical and economic impact of sound, the golden age of the studio system, the Production Code and its impact on content and style, World War II film, the Paramount decree and the break up of the studio system, the 'new' Hollywood, the emergence of 'independent' film, and the development of many niche cinematic markets and aesthetics. The course will analyze a cross-section of American films, directors, actors, styles, and genres.

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May 19, 2014
ENGL19412 Banned Books and Censorship Trials: Obscenity in the 20th Century
 

Themes: Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation
Perspective: Humanities

Censorship as a cultural practice in the west is in fact older than the printing press. Books of history, fictional narrative, religion, and science have all at one time or another been targeted by various forms of authority in an effort to draw a border around different cultural discourses. In the twentieth century, in the United Kingdom and the United States, the focus of official efforts toward the censorship of literature began to coalesce around a now famously slippery descriptive category known as “the obscene.” James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, and Vladimir Nabokov among others all saw novels they had written challenged or banned outright based on the claim that their subject matter was obscene, and the notion of obscenity continues to exert a powerful influence on public discourse even today.

The main work of the course involves close textual analysis, and in thinking about perspectives on the question of obscenity within twentieth-century literature, students will begin to think carefully about the centrality of language both to self-representation and to the ways in which authors and readers characterize the world around them. The “obscenity” debate surrounding Joyce’s Ulysses, for example, hinged largely on a reading of the final chapter, an extremely dense section of prose that contains almost no punctuation and narrates a character’s thoughts as she begins falling asleep. Does the atmosphere created by the stream-of-consciousness style and the ways in which graphic depictions of sex jar up against reflections on more mundane aspects of daily life insulate the text effectively from charges of obscenity? For this writer, as for the others on the syllabus, the specific use of language that each employs is central to the creation of a particular field of aesthetic (and perhaps ethical) effects that enable a continued dialogue between the category of the “obscene” and that of the privileged and licit exploration of different aspects of human sexuality.

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May 12, 2014
LNGS19401 The Protagonist in French Literature: Hero and Anti-Hero in French Literature


Themes: Identities
Perspective: Humanities

This course will examine how the identity of the main character is represented and developed in major French novels (in translation) from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Texts to be studied include The Song of Roland, Pantagruel, The Princess of Cleves, Manon Lescaut, Old Goriot, and The Stranger. (Note: Details for specific editions available at the bookstore will be listed under Required Materials).

Through the study of works of literature in translation, students will gain knowledge of the works of major French authors and an understanding of literary and cultural movements in France from the Middle Ages through the 20th century.  Students will explore and describe the representation of the main character and its development in the French novel.  Students will learn basic library research skills through an extended cultural study group.  They will also hone their skills in literary and cultural analysis through active class discussion, an online discussion forum, class presentations, and midterm and final papers.  Suggested e-portfolio artifacts are either the mid-term or final paper or a video or powerpoint from the presentation.

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May 5, 2014
ARTH20400 ARTH20400 Visual Culture of Science

Themes: Inquiry, Imagination, and Innovation and World of Systems
Perspective: Creative Arts

This course explores the intersection of visual culture and science. Students will examine and analyze the ways in which images have been used to document and explain the methods and discoveries of scientific inquiry. Through lecture and discussion, we will consider conventions of representation, semantic encoding, and cultural references of scientific illustrations and visualizations. We will also consider the impact of science on popular visual culture and art since the early 17th century. Examples will be drawn from astronomy, biology, chemistry, and physics, among other fields.

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April 28, 2014
RLST24000 Writing about Religion: Heaven and Hell

ICC Designation: Writing Intensive

This seminar is an interdisciplinary introduction to how portrayals of heaven and hell have been transformed over time, with a focus on learning how to write about religion from a secularly minded but religiously-informed context.  We will focus on various myths, including the Genesis account of the Garden of Eden and its vision of paradise; the Jewish story of the fall of the watchers; legends about Lilith, the supposed first wife of Adam; medieval stories about heaven and hell; analysis of the historical development of stories about Satan; and contemporary pop culture portrayals of heaven and hell. As we move through our chronological analysis, we will look at how the same stories are shaped and changed by the social and historical movements that provide their context. We’ll learn how writing can help you process ideas that are complicated, intertwined, and that are transformed through time. At the end of the course, you’ll be aware of how the notion of heaven and hell developed in Judeo-Christian and Muslim tradition, and how these ideas still shape culture and society today, whether they are actually believed to exist or not. Throughout the course, you will be invited to think critically about the material you encounter, placing it in its historical context and assessing it, reflecting upon, and synthesizing it as a product of human thought as expressed through writing.  You will practice discussion skills, listening skills, and basic research skills, and you will also be encouraged to actively practice your writing skills through a series of short papers and one long paper, composed through a series of iterations with careful editing and revision.

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April 21, 2014
OTBS20600 Culture of Disability

ICC Designation: Diversity

In this course students study the notion of disability as it has been constructed throughout Western history, providing an in depth look at the extent to which disability has been influenced by social, economic, political and historical contexts. Students develop a history timeline of events that have impacted the construction of disability as well as define disability from legislative, economic and other statistical sources.  Multiple definitions based on historically embedded events, which have evolved over time are studied setting the background for the development of disability identity. Because disability is never a singular identity, the construction of individual and group identification of disability as a culture separate from or combined with other identities is discussed as well as this impacts power discussions among groups who may typically be disenfranchised  (i.e women, people of color and LGBT).  Comparisons are made between the impact that these other identity groups have as influencing power structures as compared to those who have disabilities and how the movements have been similar and different on the road to eliminating discrimination.

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April 11, 2014
PHIL20400 Choosing Wisely

ICC Designation: Quantitative Literacy

This class serves as an introduction to rational choice theory. Rational choice theory is fundamentally about using numbers to capture preference order (I prefer x to y) and preference strength (I prefer x to y much more than I prefer x to z), and trying to use those numbers to come to uniquely rational choices. Rational choice theory also considers the probability of various events occurring to further refine our choices.

Rational choice theory is an interdisciplinary study; the product of the joint efforts of philosophers, mathematicians, economists, social scientists, and others. It is both used to describe how people do in fact behave and to prescribe how people ought to behave. Besides becoming comfortable with the formal tools of rational choice theory, this class will primarily be concerned with some of the contentious assumptions behind the theory. We will also have a chance to look at both philosophical applications of the theory and uses of the theory in other disciplines; e.g. political science and evolutionary biology.

This course is roughly divided into thirds. The first third deals with individuals making decisions independently of others (decision theory). The second third of the course will consider people making choices in the context of other individuals (game theory). The final third of the course will investigate aggregating individual preferences to come to group decisions (social choice theory).

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March 24, 2014
LNGS19403 The Novel in the Mirror: Latin American Literature on Film

ICC Designation: Diversity
Theme: Identities
Perspective: Humanities

This course focuses on the collaboration of Latin American writers and filmmakers from Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, and Brazil. Students will study how authors from each of these countries bring the question of who I am as an individual and as a community to the forefront by depicting race, ethnicity, social class, and gender dilemmas that the different Latin American countries have experienced over time.

Members of the class will read about and watch how the Cuban revolution, the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the long military conflicts in the 20th in Peru, and two brutal dictatorships in the sixties, seventies, and eighties in both Brazil and Argentina have shaped the identities of each of these Latin American nations.

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March 10, 2014
ENGL22100 Survey of African-American Literature

ICC Designation: Diversity

In this class, the way in which African-American writers establish their own aspects of their literary history will be explored in detail.  Beginning in the eighteenth century and moving forward through the present moment, students will examine the thematic and stylistic progression of this particular era of African American history, and/or significant transformations in their methods of literary expression.  A variety of texts by African American authors will be read followed by discussions regarding racial and gender stereotypes when they are apparent in, or relevant to, the literature the class is analyzing. 

One of the objectives of the course is to learn to identify and assess the literary devices, such as theme, style, narrative point-of-view, form, and structure, an African-American author uses to work together to make meaning within a text.  Another goal is to learn to accept differing views when discussing controversial subjects and to strive for a productive outcome for all involved when having disagreeable conversations.

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February 24, 2014
WRTG19401 Writing the West: The Construction of Self and Other from 1492 to the Present

Theme: Identities
Perspective: Humanities

Writing the West directly addresses the key question of “Who are we and how do we distinguish ourselves from others?”   in regard to the invention of the “West” and its modernity.  Students will evaluate the reasons why the West differentiated itself from the rest of the world over the course of numerous centuries.  Several admirable episodes that took place between the 15th century and the late 19th century will be studied to reveal and confirm the ways in which the West has formed its identity, often in opposition to groups, cultures, and nations it deems “other,” whether savage and pagan or peaceful and exotic. 

The course will examine significant texts that have served to construct the sense of identity of the “West” as well as the identities of those peoples and cultures that are seen as deficient in its own self-ascribed attributes of “civilization” and “progress.”  Topics that may be covered include Columbus and the voyages of discovery; the conquest of Mexico, the Cherokee removal, the Cold War, and the War on Terror.

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February 10, 2014
PSYC23500 Conservation Psychology: Psychology for a Sustainable World

Theme: The Quest for a Sustainable Future
Perspective: Social Sciences

This course will revolve around the question, “How can we effect human behavior change so that we can live sustainably on the planet?” The many ways in which psychology can help answer this question will be examined. Readings from ecopsychology writers, biologists and ecologists, as well as empirical research in psychology, will be interpreted and critically assessed.  Films in class predispose the connection between values, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors. All of these resources will signify that when it comes to sustainable behavior choices, values don’t always predict behavior.

Several class discussions and blog entries will ask students to relate their discoveries to their own development, identity, values and the role of personal beliefs and social factors in their own behavior (sustainable or not).  An interdisciplinary service learning project (a collaboration with the course, Conservation Biology) will also be assigned to students which will entail proposing new solutions and techniques for promoting sustainable behavior in humans. This project will require members of the class to conceive, design, and (at least partially) implement a campus-based conservation project.

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January 27, 2014
JWST29400 - Contemporary Jewish Identities: Gender, Race, and Power

Themes: Identities and Power and Justice
Perspective: Humanities

This course addresses the large number of contemporary Jewish identities, focusing on Jews in the United States and Israel, the two largest contemporary Jewish communities. Themes that will be discussed will address the meaning of being Jewish, if the identity people relate to is religious, ethnic, national or racial, and whether or not there is a common Jewish identity among Jews of widely varying ethnic origins, religious affiliation, and national allegiances. These themes will be explored through four different topics, namely Jews and Race, Post-Holocaust Jewish Identity, Jewish Identity in Israel, and Gender, Feminism, and Queer Identity.

While studying Jews and race, the focus will be on how Jews have been been viewed and treated by others. Students will read about and learn how the status of Jews in the contemporary world has been transformed by the Holocaust. Now that Israel is dominated by Jews, the existence of a large Arab minority and military occupation of the lands and its affect on Israeli Jewish identity will be studied. Last, but not least, the impact of women struggling for equality in Jewish life on contemporary Jewish identity in the United States and Israel and the movement for LGBT rights in both countries will be examined.

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January 13, 2014
BINT21000 - Boom, Bust and the American Economic Cycle

Theme: A World of Systems
Perspective: Social Sciences

This course will look at the historical developments in the U.S. economy, with special focus on the role of capital markets and the financial services industry, from the 1930s to the present.  Crucial events such as stock market collapses, major legislations governing the operations of financial markets & institutions, and milestones like the Great Recession and the Subprime Lending Crisis will be critically examined.  The common thread throughout the course is to identify and analyze the interrelationship of multiple political, regulatory, economic, technological, global, and socio-psychological forces that have shaped the boom and bust cycles in the US economy.

Various viewpoints focusing on the practical aspects of enforcement, social welfare through consumer protection, political roadblocks, and campaign finance reform will be evaluated.  Students will also analyze the consequences of economic volatility on companies and consumers alike, both in the United States and abroad.   It will become very apparent that complex, powerful and interwoven domestic and global forces that shape the behavior of the participants in capital markets and the financial services industry significantly impact the health of the economies around the world.

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December 9, 2013
ENGL19410 - Engendering Modernity: 20th Century Women Writers

Theme: Identities
Perspective: Humanities

In this class the role played by women authors that helped produce the cultural and historical phenomenon that we now refer to as “modernity” will be examined. Selected texts and other resources will be used to generate a series of questions that will allow students to build a fuller, more complex understanding of the status of gender in the modern (and postmodern) period. The focus on gender and authorship will give those in the class  the chance to study the ways culture is gendered and will come to understand the developmental process of identity formation.

The main work of the course will involve close textual analysis and contemplating the significance of the perspective offered by gender within literature. Members of the class will draw upon resources from an assortment of  media including works of Toni Morrison, Georgia O’Keeffe, and Virginia Woolf, just to name a few. Students will begin to think carefully about the centrality of language both to self-representation and to the ways in which authors and readers characterize the world around them.

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