IC Courses in Antigua

10/22/2004

Contributed by Melissa Gattine

Two courses will be offered in Antigua in January as part of the College's growing relationship with the Caribbean island nation.

Screenwriting: Thinking Critically on Location in Antigua and Photojournalism Workshop will be offered through the Park School but will be open to all students. In addition, students from Antigua, Barbuda, and other Caribbean islands may enroll in the courses as part of an effort to boost the filmmaking and video-production industry there.

For information about the screenwriting course, contact Elisabeth Nonas; for the photojournalism course, the contact is Janice Levy.

In May, 10 students from the Ithaca campus and 8 from Antigua completed a two-week course in sound gathering and audio production taught by assistant professor Meg Jamieson. The student teams produced a 15-minute documentary as the final project for the course. Listening to Antigua provides a historical perspective on the recent change in government in Antigua. The documentary was broadcast on Observer Radio in Antigua.

Also in May Garry Brodhead and Janice Levy embarked on a fact-finding mission to explore possibilities for additional courses in music, literature, business, and the health sciences. They met with government officials and representatives of the business community and health services in Antigua.

This summer Kimberlyn David, a senior in culture and communication in the Division of Interdisciplinary and International Studies, spent six weeks in Antigua working as an intern with the HAMA film production company and the Daily Observer newspaper. David is the fourth Ithaca College student to complete an internship in Antigua since the summer of 2003.

Over the next several months, representatives of other IC schools will meet with Antiguan officials to discuss programs that would be open to students from the United States and the Caribbean.

Janice Levy emphasizes that Ithaca College involves Antiguans in the courses it offers. "It's not just students from the U.S. going to the Caribbean; it's a shared approach that includes the people of Antigua and Barbuda in our workshops and classes," she says. "The result is a positive outcome for the people of Antigua who learn the subject matters we teach while the Ithaca students also learn about Caribbean culture."

Contributed by Melissa Gattine

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