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Submitted on behalf of H&S Dean Leslie W. Lewis.

The National Science Foundation has awarded a grant of approximately $150,000 to four faculty members in the School of Humanities and Sciences.

The project, entitled "Multidisciplinary Sustainability Modules: Integrating STEM Courses," is under the direction of Ali S. Erkan, Department of Computer Science; Jason G. Hamilton, Department of Biology; Thomas J. Pfaff, Department of Mathematics; Michael Rogers, Department of Physics.

The proposed project will create a framework for incorporating multidisciplinary projects in scientific education. Specifically, the project will focus on the rich set of problems encountered in sustainability in order to formulate how they can be tackled by students from different disciplines working collectively, iteratively, but not necessarily simultaneously, over a set of online tools for exchanging data, code, reports, and expertise.

This award is effective June 1, 2009, and expires May 31, 2012.

NSF Grant Awarded to Four H&S Faculty Members | 1 Comments |
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NSF Grant Awarded to Four H&S Faculty Members Comment from malpass on 03/16/2009
Congratulations to these four faculty for working to get rare NSF funding for the
sustainability effort. IC students should be aware of these kinds of actions that
directly benefit them. This is an impressive grant that will keep IC at the
forefront of environmental issues---and presumably act as a draw for those
many high school students interested in this.