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CAPS, Active Minds and TWLOHA invite you to hear Regi Carpenter tell the story of her teenage experience with mental health.  Snap!, My Teenage Life: Breaking Down and Finding Hope was described by The Harvard Crimson Review as "Harrowing, uplifting, haunting and surprisingly, hilarious."wing, uplifting, haunting & surprisingly hilarious.”

Thursday, February 28th.  7pm.  Emerson Suite B    

Regi Carpenter is a nationally acclaimed touring professional storyteller, writer and workshop presenter. She has performed at the National Storytelling Festival, the Ojai Storytelling Festival, Cape Girardeau Festival and numerous other festivals thoughout the country. Her book, “Where There’s Smoke, There’s Dinner—Stories of a Seared Childhood” will be published in 2013. 

Regi is a Lecturer in the Department of Communication Studies.  She will be accompanied by Cellist, Elizabeth Simkin, from the School of Music.

 Individuals with disabilities requiring accommodations should contact LeBron Rankins at lrankins@ithaca.edu or (607) 274-3136. We ask that requests for accommodations be made as soon as possible.

Mental Health Presentation - SNAP! My Teenage Life: Breaking Down and Finding Hope | 1 Comments |
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Mental Health Presentation - SNAP! My Teenage Life: Breaking Down and Finding Hope Comment from henderso on 02/20/2013
I had the pleasure of seeing Regina do this performance when she did it in one of our galleries. It is a really wonderful piece of work, capturing what it felt like (and may feel like now for many of our students) to face mental health challenges while still passing through adolescence into early adulthood. I hope people will strongly encourage students to attend--and I hope many faculty and staff will find the time. In addition to its educative value, it is simply wonderful art--we are very fortunate to have someone of Regi's gifts, stature, and skill as a teacher on our faculty.