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Important Message for the Campus Community | 47 Comments |
The following comments are the opinions of the individuals who posted them. They do not necessarily represent the position of Intercom or Ithaca College, and the editors reserve the right to monitor and delete comments that violate College policies.
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Important Message for the Campus Community Comment from aerkan on 04/26/2005
I am one of the lucky people who knew Morgan. He was a student in both of the courses I'm teaching this semester. His intelligence, his uniqueness, and his overall wonderful nature were reasons why I felt privileged to be teaching here. Having read the eloquent words of Gavin and Dung, I don't think I have much to add to our need to be caring for one another.

But I do have one thing to bring forth, something often at the back of my mind but can never the find the right words to mention in a conversion or to add to my syllabi. As faculty members, we genuinely care about what goes on in the lives of our students. Unfortunately we cannot always initiate a conversion on emotional and delicate matters because we also don't want to invade anyone's privacy. So here is what you should keep in mind... From the day you get to know us to the day you forget we exist (i.e. well beyond graduation), you should always remember that we would be more than happy to help you in any way possible as you handle the potentially most turbulent years of your life. In fact, at least in my case though I'm sure most of my colleagues would agree, you would be doing us a favor; the greatest thing about being a teacher is not the lecturing, or the grading, or the taking of the attendance but having the feeling that we have been in some way, at some level, useful in a person's life.

Ali