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If students wish to fulfill requirements of the ICC using study abroad coursework credit, they may submit a petition request.

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Kerline Batista (Sport Media Class of 2016) published her research on the consequences of parental absences from children’s participation in sports.  Her blog appears in the website in One Million for Work Flexibility.

 

Batista read over 30 articles and book chapters in the process of writing this editorial, documenting that parental presence at children’s sporting events is an important vehicle for family bonding. And yet, many parents labor in jobs that do not provide for the types of flexibility that make this possible. This work was performed in Stephen Sweet’s sociology course “Work and Family.”

Read the article here:

http://www.workflexibility.org/millennial-voice-build-memories-not-resumes-analysis-decrease-parental-attendance-youth-sport/

 

Diethyl 4-(biphenyl-4-yl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate 
Acta Cryst. (2014), (E70), o791, Steiger, Monacelli, Li, Hunting and Natale.

The crystal structure of diethyl 4-(biphenyl-4-yl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate was solved using Ithaca College’s single crystal X-ray diffractometer. The compound was synthesized by our collaborators at the University of Montana.

1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs) are an extensively studied class of compounds that are known predominantly for their L-type gated calcium channel modulation. There have been extensive structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies done on DHPs that have revealed the basic structural requirements for robust binding affinity to calcium channels. Other studies in the field have shown DHPs bind to multiple receptors, most notably the multiple drug resistant protein 1 (MDR1).

Monday, November 17, 2014, 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. (Register here)
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center
Facilitated by Shaianne Osterreich, Associate Professor and Ithaca Seminar Coordinator; Danette Johnson, Vice Provost; Susan Adams Delaney, Assistant Professor

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Friday, November 21, 2014, 2 - 3 p.m. (Register here)
Center for Faculty Excellence, 316 Gannett Center

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Tuesday, November 18, 2014
4:00 - 5:30 p.m., Handwerker Gallery, Gannett Center

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This lively, engaging, and content-based presentation will give an overview of the history of this very misunderstood holiday.  Based on the only primary source documents that chronicle the “First Thanksgiving”, participants will learn accurate and culturally appropriate information about the English settlers at Plimoth and the Wampanoag, the Native people who inhabited that area.

Where: Textor 103

When: Tuesday, November 18, 7:00pm

The presentation will discuss the actual events of 1621 including the feast, the relationship between the English settlers and the Wampanoag and how this story became the holiday we know today.  The concept of thanksgiving held by many Native Americans will be emphasized throughout.

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While most folks have their feet planted firmly on the ground, IC Physics professor Luke Keller is engaged in observing space from a flying telescope. In collaboration with NASA and other researchers, Luke works aboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, an eight-foot-wide, 17-ton telescope situated within a modified Boeing 747. Work in the stratosphere and beyond with this and other observatories to study the formation of stars and planets has led him to wonder about how we define "the environment." Conclusion: It does not stop at the Earth's atmosphere! Luke will describe his work and how he came to be working on a flying telescope, then turn to a discussion of the "homo-sapiens-sphere," (also known as space debris and space "junk"), which now reaches to the edge of our solar system.

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Justine Vosloo, assistant professor in the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, and three ESS graduate students presented at the Association for Applied Sport Psychology conference in Las Vegas, NV last month. 

The presentation titles and student names were

  • Case Study: Implications of a season-long imagery program with a collegiate diving team
    Pat Pidgeon and Dr. Justine Vosloo (CC-AASP)
  • Making Exercise Behaviors Stick: The Experiences of a Neophyte Exercise Behavior Coach in a Workplace Wellness Facility.
    Sierra Yaple and Dr. Justine Vosloo (CC-AASP)
  • A foot in the door? Reflections on a mental skills internship in a high school athletic department.
    William Way and Dr. Justine Vosloo (CC-AASP).

All three presentations highlighted the applied consulting and fieldwork that our graduate students are engaging in within the IC and greater Ithaca community.

 

Stewart Auyash, associate professor and chair of the Department of Health Promotion and Physical Education was recently invited by New York University at Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) in the United Arab Emirates to present two lectures and discussions exploring international health and human rights: “War, Health, and the Crisis of Humanitarianism” and “Global Organizational Responses to Ebola.”

His visit was sponsored by the Office of the Vice Chancellor and the Division of Social Sciences at NYU Abu Dhabi.

He also co-presented a joint lecture and interactive workshop at NYUAD with Patricia R. Zimmermann entitled “Conflict Zones: Health, Human Rights, New Media, Ethics, Empathy,” which analyzed the complex ethical issues of humanitarian aid, emerging interfaces, and transnational projects in new media that rethink these relationships along more ethical and participatory vectors according to the human rights principle of “do no harm.”

The Strategic Sourcing initiative is well underway and the project team is eager to answer any questions that you may have. 

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Primitive Pursuits, a program affiliated with Cornell Cooperative Extension, will host an information session on Monday November 17 from 6:00 to 7:00 PM in CNS 1-B to describe their rigorous instructor training and certification program, and to field any questions you may have about how to connect with this awesome bunch of explorers and wilderness stewards. 

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Maya Schenwar will be visiting campus to give a talk based on her new book, Locked Down, Locked Out: Why Prison Doesn’t Work and How We Can Do Better. The talk will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 9, at 7:00 p.m. in School of Business 111 (the Carl Sgrecci Lecture Hall).

Using true stories of those behind bars and of the families — including her own — whose loved ones are incarcerated, she argues compellingly that our broken punishment system needs a major overhaul. With 2.3 million men, women, and teens currently behind bars, families and communities — especially poor communities of color — are often shattered.

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What are micro-aggressions, micro-inequities and unconscious bias? How do they manifest themselves in our everyday interactions? How does this bias impact our daily decision making process? These are some questions that will be explored doing this highly interactive workshop, facilitated by Dr. Belisa Gonzalez.  

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“Hide not your talents. They for use were made. What’s a sundial in the shade?” Benjamin Franklin

This workshop will help participants identify and leverage your strengths. Identifying and capitalizing on your strengths will lead to your success as an individual and as a team member. Get to the heart of building and sustaining strength-based performance and discover the power of you at your best.   

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It's only November, but graduation is right around the corner. Get prepared with Career Services!

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The IC Library and FLEFF have collaborated in the development of an extensive and unique collection of media materials that demonstrate the broad-ranging scope of the festival over the last ten years.  

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The next No Pressure Blood Pressure will be held on Wednesday, November 19th.

Important reasons not to miss the next screening:

1. 65 million Americans have hypertension (high blood pressure)

2. Many people don't even know their blood pressure is high because there are no symptoms in most cases

3. Hypertension can lead to heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and kidney disease

4. 66% of those IC employees measured at the last screening were pre-hypertensive   (above ideal )

5. A 20 point increase in systolic blood pressure (top number) or a 10 point increase in diastolic blood pressure (bottom number) doubles the risk of heart disease.

6. Poor diet, inactivity, and being overweight can lead to an increase in blood pressure

7. If one does not adopt a healthy lifestyle, the hypertensive individual will need to take costly medication with potential side effects

8. Physical and emotional stress can elevate your blood pressure

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The Cortaga Jug is this Saturday -- start your game day with a hot breakfast! Campus Center Dining Hall with have hot breakfast items available, starting at 8:30am, Saturday, November 15th.

So, fuel up and enjoy the game! Go Bombers!

After a rigorous and competitive bidding process—one which garnered participation from a large cross-section of the campus community—I am pleased to announce that Ithaca College has engaged with Unimarket to provide our first e-marketplace solution.

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