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Katalin Lustyik, associate professor in the Department of Media Arts, Sciences, and Studies, gave an invited talk at the Budapest Business School, Hungary on November 11.

The talk, focusing on her current research project, is entitled "Children and Media in the 21st century: research perspectives."

Kerline Batista (Sport Media Class of 2016) published her research on the consequences of parental absences from children’s participation in sports.  Her blog appears in the website in One Million for Work Flexibility.

 

Batista read over 30 articles and book chapters in the process of writing this editorial, documenting that parental presence at children’s sporting events is an important vehicle for family bonding. And yet, many parents labor in jobs that do not provide for the types of flexibility that make this possible. This work was performed in Stephen Sweet’s sociology course “Work and Family.”

Read the article here:

http://www.workflexibility.org/millennial-voice-build-memories-not-resumes-analysis-decrease-parental-attendance-youth-sport/

 

Diethyl 4-(biphenyl-4-yl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate 
Acta Cryst. (2014), (E70), o791, Steiger, Monacelli, Li, Hunting and Natale.

The crystal structure of diethyl 4-(biphenyl-4-yl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate was solved using Ithaca College’s single crystal X-ray diffractometer. The compound was synthesized by our collaborators at the University of Montana.

1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs) are an extensively studied class of compounds that are known predominantly for their L-type gated calcium channel modulation. There have been extensive structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies done on DHPs that have revealed the basic structural requirements for robust binding affinity to calcium channels. Other studies in the field have shown DHPs bind to multiple receptors, most notably the multiple drug resistant protein 1 (MDR1).

Justine Vosloo, assistant professor in the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, and three ESS graduate students presented at the Association for Applied Sport Psychology conference in Las Vegas, NV last month. 

The presentation titles and student names were

  • Case Study: Implications of a season-long imagery program with a collegiate diving team
    Pat Pidgeon and Dr. Justine Vosloo (CC-AASP)
  • Making Exercise Behaviors Stick: The Experiences of a Neophyte Exercise Behavior Coach in a Workplace Wellness Facility.
    Sierra Yaple and Dr. Justine Vosloo (CC-AASP)
  • A foot in the door? Reflections on a mental skills internship in a high school athletic department.
    William Way and Dr. Justine Vosloo (CC-AASP).

All three presentations highlighted the applied consulting and fieldwork that our graduate students are engaging in within the IC and greater Ithaca community.

 

Stewart Auyash, associate professor and chair of the Department of Health Promotion and Physical Education was recently invited by New York University at Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) in the United Arab Emirates to present two lectures and discussions exploring international health and human rights: “War, Health, and the Crisis of Humanitarianism” and “Global Organizational Responses to Ebola.”

His visit was sponsored by the Office of the Vice Chancellor and the Division of Social Sciences at NYU Abu Dhabi.

He also co-presented a joint lecture and interactive workshop at NYUAD with Patricia R. Zimmermann entitled “Conflict Zones: Health, Human Rights, New Media, Ethics, Empathy,” which analyzed the complex ethical issues of humanitarian aid, emerging interfaces, and transnational projects in new media that rethink these relationships along more ethical and participatory vectors according to the human rights principle of “do no harm.”

 

His paper "The Middle Horizon Site of Sonay: New Radiocarbon Dates (!) and Interpretations (?)" was presented at the 33rd annual Northeast Conference on Andean Archaeology and Ethnohistory at the University of Vermont on Oct. 18-19.

 

 

Read more . . . (125 words)

Susan Giarratano (HSHP senior), Ellie Fitts Fulmer, and Nia Nunn Makepeace (both Assistant Professors of Education) presented, "'Going Too Far?' Exploring Race and Humor in Teacher Education" at the National Association for Multicultural Education annual conference in Tucson, AZ. Their roundtable presentation featured the work of five undergraduate students and the two faculty members as they examined racial comedy media clips together in the context of a course on multicultural education. This analysis will inform their upcoming research to identify a Pedagogy for Racial Comedy. The research team is currently co-authoring a piece on this topic for journal submission this fall.

 

Hannah Steinfeld (Sociology Class of 2015) and Yanilsa Frias (Business Administration and Marketing Communication Class of 2015) published their research on the challenges confronting working parents raising children with special needs on the website in One Million for Work Flexibility.

Steinfeld and Frias read over 40 articles and book chapters in the process of writing this editorial, documenting that children caring for children with disabilities has profound effects on parents’ labor force attachment, career prospects, and strain. They conclude that employers can help make meaningful differences in the lives of these families by expanding access to flexible work options. This work was performed in Stephen Sweet’s sociology course “Work and Family.”

Read their article here:

http://www.workflexibility.org/millennial-voice-raising-children-with-special-needs-mothers-disabled/

Maki gave a seminar titled, "To Splice or Not to Splice: an Ultraconserved Mode of Gene Regulation," and guest lectured in an Advanced Biochemistry Course on the Molecular Biology of Cancer titled "My very own lung cancer case study: targeted therapies" in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department at Washington and Lee University. November 2014

Katie Hoover (HSHP senior) and professors Ellie Fitts Fulmer and Sherry Deckman (both Education) presented, “Heteronormativity and Ableism in Elementary and Middle School Health Textbooks” at the National Association for Multicultural Education Conference in Tucson, AZ. This roundtable presentation focused on Hoover, Fulmer, and Deckman’s current research on elementary and middle school textbooks’ depictions of race, class, gender, sexuality, and ability. This research team will present additional findings from this project at the American Educational Research Association conference in April in Chicago.

 

Nancy Reynolds, Program Director of Health Promotion in the Center for Counseling, Health and Wellness, presented a session at the annual conference of the New York State College Health Association (NYSCHA) on October 23, 2014. The NYSCHA conference is attended by college health professionals across NYS from disciplines including medical, nursing, counseling, and health promotion. 

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Beatriz Montilla (H&S senior) and Sherry Deckman (Assistant Professor of Education) presented, “Complicating Empathy and Critical Perspective-Taking in Multicultural Teacher Education Coursework” at the National Association for Multicultural Education Conference in Tucson, AZ. This interactive workshop drew on a book chapter the two co-authored that is to be published this winter. The workshop focused on the challenges of cultivating empathy in teacher education coursework that focuses on issues of race and equity.

 

In case you haven't heard, employers ARE researching candidates online before hiring them. Make sure you're not putting your candidacy in jeopardy because of your tweets, pictures, comments, blogs, etc. Come to this workshop to learn what employers are saying and what you should be doing to protect your professional image.

Read more . . . (124 words)


In an interview, Don Beachler provided an analysis of the ways that Ithaca contributed to Tom Reed's  landslide reelection win to the House of Representatives.

http://www.ithacajournal.com/story/news/local/2014/11/05/ithaca-aid-reeds-landslide-analyst-thinks/18557853/

 

Marella Feltrin-Morris, Assistant Professor of Italian, presented a paper at the 29th University of West Georgia Interdisciplinary Conference in the Humanities: Worlds and Words (October 30-November 1, 2014).

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Quoted in the media: Faculty members Diane Gayeski, Donald Bleacher, Michael McCall, Catherine Weidner, Zillah Eisenstein, Sandra Steingraber and Asma Barlas; Staff member John Bradac; Alumnus Steve Bell. For more information on the following articles, please visit the IC in the Media page.

IC in the Media

 

Read more . . . (186 words)

Ithaca College voice professor and mezzo-soprano, Dawn Pierce, just returned from singing Charlotte in Massenet’s opera, Werther with Mobile Opera in Alabama.  Tamara Ikenberg of AL.COM says; "As Charlotte, mezzo soprano Pierce, who is singing the role for the first time, nails Charlotte's strength and grace.

Read more . . . (76 words)

 Naeem Inayatullah was chair and discussant on a panel “Capitalism and Cool” in Cornell’s inaugural Conference on Histories of American Capitalism, November 6-8.  

Chair and Comment: Naeem Inayatullah, Ithaca College

Jim McGuigan, Loughborough University (UK), “Cool Capitalism: The Signs and Symbols of Disaffections in Mainstream Neoliberal Culture”  

Donnell Alexander, Journalist / Independent Scholar, “Capitalism and Hip-Hop Mixtape Culture Cool, 1986-Present”

Joel Dinerstein, Tulane University, “The History of Cool from the Postwar (Not Selling Out) to the Present (Selling In)”

http://hoc.ilr.cornell.edu/sites/hoc.ilr.cornell.edu/files/shared/ILR_HoCiProgram_2014_12pp_v4bforweb.pdf

Matthew Holtmeier, postdoctoral teaching fellow in Screen Studies, authored an article in the anthology Cinematic Homecomings: Exile and Return in Transnational Cinema. ​

His piece, titled "​Burning Straw Men: The 1979 Revolution and Bahman Farmanara's Stubborn Cosmopolitanism," explores director Bahman Farmanara's departure from Iran due to the 1979 revolution, and his subsequent return after working as a producer abroad. The films Farmanara made after returning to Iran illustrate the director's 'stubborn cosmopolitanism,' despite the newly structured sense of national identity in post-revolution Iran.

Olivia Abry (Sport Management Class of 2017) published her research on the challenges confronting working single parent mothers on the website One Million for Workplace Flexibility.  Olivia read over 30 articles and book chapters in the process of writing this editorial, concluding that single parents face challenges in meeting care needs of their children, laboring in jobs that lack flexibility, and discrimination on the basis of gender and parental status.  This work was performed in Stephen Sweet’s sociology course “Work and Family.”  Read Olivia’s article here: http://www.workflexibility.org/millennial-voice-failures-heroes-constant-struggle-single-parent/.

 

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