About Abstracts

Sample Abstracts

Abstracts are usually 250 to 300 words in length and should be no more than 450 words.

Sample Abstract (multiple authors)

Abstract Title:
Deletion of the Nuclear Gene YME1 Stabilizes Mutant Forms of Cox2p

Name of Author(s), (Faculty Advisor), Department, Institution and Institutional Address:
Eric S. Van Fleet, Martin G. Tomov, Vicki L. Cameron, (Susan M. Swensen), Biology Department, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY 14850

Abstract:
Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is the terminal protein complex in the electron transport chain, and CcO transfers electrons from the cytochrome c to oxygen to form water. Subunit II of the complex is the component that interacts directly with cytochrome c to accept the electrons. It is encoded by COX2, and missense mutations can lead to loss of respiration in yeast. In several missense COX2 mutants, the protein (Cox2p) has been shown to be rapidly degraded within the cell. The nuclear gene YME1 has been shown to degrade unassembled, wild type Cox2p. We wished to determine if deletion of YME1 could stabilize the mutant forms of Cox2p, and if stabilization could lead to recovery of respiratory capability. We have demonstrated by Western blot analysis that the disruption of YME1 stabilizes Cox2p in three different missense mutants. Further, this stabilization restored respiration to two of the three mutant strains as determined by growth on non-fermentable carbon sources. Surprisingly, one of the mutant strains which is restored to respiratory function bears an alteration in an amino acid conserved in the COX2 gene from all species examined.

Sample Abstract (single author)

Abstract Title:
The Isocratean Concept of Natural Law: Eloquence and Civilization in the Greco-Roman Rhetorical Tradition

Name of Author(s), (Faculty Advisor), Department, Institution and Institutional Address:
Kristal M. Reithoffer, (Robert G. Sullivan), Department of Speech Communication, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY 14850

Abstract:
Sometime before 380 BCE the Attic orator Isocrates adopted a powerful argument for the centrality of rhetoric to civil society, that the ability to persuade is both the essential human characteristic and the necessary condition for civilization. The implications of the theory are profound. If the effective use of language is the essential human attribute, a rhetorical education directly augments one’s human potential while, at the political level, any society that wishes to enjoy the blessings of civilization must foster rhetorical education and culture. This essay demonstrates how Isocrates’ theory was deployed over his career (specifically in Panegyricus 48ff; Nicocles 5-9; and Antidosis 250ff, 273ff) and advances the argument that Isocrates developed and augmented his ideas in a refutative posture, as he attempted to answer positions on rhetoric taken by Plato in the Gorgias.