Past Speakers

Dan O’Shannon
April 4, 2013

Dan O’Shannon is an executive producer and writer of the hit show Modern Family. As a writer and producer, he has made significant contributions to some of the most acclaimed network comedies of the past 25 years such as Newhart, Cheers, and Frasier. O’Shannon has won three Emmy Awards for Outstanding Comedy Series for his work on Modern Family and has received multiple Emmy nominations for Cheers and Frasier, including a win for Cheers. A Golden Globe winner, O’Shannon has also received numerous Writers Guild of America (WGA) and Producers Guild of America (PGA) awards, as well as one Academy Award nomination.


Randi Zuckerberg

November 30, 2011

Randi Zuckerberg ran marketing at Facebook for six years, where her team led the company’s U.S. election and international politics strategy, launched the live streaming industry with her media partnerships around the U.S. Presidential Inauguration, and was nominated for an Emmy Award in 2011 for her innovative TV/online coverage of the 2010 mid-term elections. Randi has appeared on CNN, Good Morning America, The Today Show, Bloomberg, NDTV & World News, and was a correspondent for the 2011 Golden Globe Awards and the World Economic Forum in Davos.

In August 2011, Randi left Facebook to start her own media company.
 

James Carville
November 1, 2010

James "The Ragin' Cajun" Carville is America's best-known political consultant. In addition, he is also a best-selling author, actor, producer, talk-show host, speaker, restaurateur, and frequent contributor on CNN. Along with pollster Stanley Greenberg, Carville founded Democracy Corps, an independent, non-profit polling organization dedicated to making government more responsive to the American people.
 

Arianna Huffington
November 3, 2009

Arianna Huffington is the co-founder and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post, a nationally syndicated columnist, and author of twelve books. She is also co-host of "Left, Right & Center," public radio's popular political roundtable program, and is a frequent guest on television shows such as Charlie Rose, Real Time with Bill Maher, Larry King Live, Countdown with Keith Olbermann and The Rachel Maddow Show.
 

Tom Wolfe
October 30, 2008

Wolfe is recognized around the world as the preeminent social commentator of our time. Called the father of "new journalism," Wolfe is the author of twelve books, including the national best sellers The Right Stuff, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Radical Chic and Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers, and The Bonfire of the Vanities.
 

James Rubin and Christiane Amanpour
April 9, 2008

James P. Rubin served under President Clinton as assistant secretary of state for public affairs and as chief spokesman for the U.S. Department of State from 1997 to 2000. He was also a top policy adviser to secretary of state Madeleine K. Albright. From May 2000 to December 2007, Rubin lived in London, working as a broadcaster, professor, commentator, and communications consultant. He is currently an adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs.

Christiane Amanpour is CNN's chief international correspondent, based in London. Amanpour has reported on crises from the world's many hotspots, including Iraq, Afghanistan, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, Somalia, Rwanda, the Balkans, and, most recently, North Korea
 

Robert Fisk
March 1, 2007

Robert Fisk holds 28 British and foreign press awards, more than any other British journalist, including the six foreign correspondent of the year awards and two journalist of the year awards. He is one of the few journalists to have interviewed Osama Bin Laden.

He is currently the Middle East correspondent for the British newspaper, the Independent. Fisk previously worked at the Times, a national daily newspaper in the United Kingdom, serving as the Middle East correspondent from 1976 to 1987 and as Ireland correspondent from 1972 to 1975.
 

Bill Moyers
September 13-15, 2005

During his long career in broadcast journalism, Bill Moyers was recognized as one of the unique voices of his generation.

During his thirty-plus years in the media, he has received more than 30 Emmys from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and two prestigious Gold Baton awards from the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award, nine Peabody Awards, and three George Polk Awards, including the Career Achievement Award.

His several books include the following best sellers: Listening to America, The Power of Myth, Healing and the Mind; The Language of Life, and, most recently, Moyers on America: A Journalist and His Times.

He is president of the Schumann Center for Media and Democracy.
 

John Seely Brown
October 18-20, 2004

John Seely Brown is widely recognized for his unique views on the human contexts in which technologies operate and for his healthy skepticism about whether change always represents genuine progress. Brown was the chief scientist at the Xerox Corporation until April 2002 and director of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) until June 2000.
 

Michael Eric Dyson
February 23-25, 2004

Michael Eric Dyson is an award-winning author, cultural critic, social analyst, Chicago Sun-Times columnist, radio commentator, ordained Baptist minister, and acclaimed scholar. He is the author of Race Rules: Navigating the Color Line, as well as books of cultural criticism about Martin Luther King Jr., Malcom X, and rapper Tupac Shakur. He writes a monthly column for Savoy magazine, is a contributing editor at Christian Century, and is a regular contributor to Vibe magazine. He has received awards from the National Association of Black Journalists and the NAACP.
 

Pat Mitchell
November 11-13, 2002

Pat Mitchell is president and chief executive officer of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). She is the first woman and first producer to serve as CEO of the nation's largest and only noncommercial broadcasting service. A former network correspondent, independent producer, and Time Warner executive, Mitchell now oversees the operations of a $1 billion national enterprise made up of 346 member stations whose mission is to enrich the lives of all Americans and strengthen social capital in the communities they serve.
 

Ken Burns
October 8-10, 2001

Ken Burns has been making award-winning documentary films for more than 25 years. In 1981 he produced and directed the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge. He went on to make several other award-winning films. Burns was the director, producer, co-writer, chief cinematographer, music director, and executive producer of the landmark television series, The Civil War.

He was the director, producer, co-writer, chief cinematographer, music director, and executive producer of the PBS series, Baseball, covering the history of the sport from the 1840s to the present. Through the extensive use of archival photographs and newsreel footage, baseball as a mirror of our larger society was brought to the screen in September 1994. It became the most watched series in PBS history, attracting more than 45 million viewers. Baseball received numerous awards, including an Emmy, the CINE Golden Eagle Award, the Clarion Award, and the Television Critics Award for outstanding achievement in sports and special programming.


Other Speakers:

* Carole Simpson, ABC News correspondent and anchor, World News Tonight Sunday
* Clarence Page, author, commentator, and Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist
* P.J. O'Rourke, best-selling author and leading political satirist
* Bob Brown, ABC News correspondent, 20/20
* Jeff Greenfield, CNN political analyst

Please note: Job titles and company associations listed above reflect the role each speaker had the year he/she served as the Park Distinguished Visitor.

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