Academics

Fall 2014 Classes

All classes are worth three credits unless otherwise noted and are generally offered each semester. For more information click here to go to Ithaca's online catalog.

CRN#

COURSE

TITLE

DAY

TIMES

21403

CNPH 3000-61

Fiction Film Theory

R

10am-1:30pm

21404

CNPH 30500-61

Contemporary Film Criticism: Film Comedy*

W

7pm-10:30pm

21405

CNPH 33300-61

Advanced Screenwriting

R

2:30-5:30pm

21406

CNPH 43300-61

Screenwriting Workshop

W

7:00-10:00pm

 

 

 

 

 

21408

JOUR 48800-61

Issues and the News

R

2:30-5:30pm

 

 

 

 

 

21410

STCM 31000-61

Organizational Speech Writing & Interviewing*

R

7-10pm

21411

STCM 33200-61

Writing for Public Relations

T

10am-1pm

 

 

 

 

 

21413

TVR 31200-61

Government & Media

T

2:45-5:45pm

21417

TVR 31200-62

Government & Media

T

7pm-10pm

21414

TVR 33300-61

Writing for Series TV

R

7pm-10pm

21415

TVR 33500-61

Electronic Media Criticism*

T

10am-1:30pm

22751

TVR 43100-61

Advanced Writing for Television & Radio

T

2:30-5:30pm

23713

TVR 46000-62

Senior Seminar: Youth/Media

M

2:30-5:30pm

21416

TVR 46000-61

Senior Seminar

R

7:00-10:00pm

*Denotes an elective course open to all majors.

FALL/SPRING ELECTIVE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
(open to all majors)

CONTEMPORARY FILM CRITICISM: Film Comedy
CNPH-30500-61, 3 credits
Thursdays 7:00pm - 10:00pm, Dr. Stephen Tropiano

This course will focus on the history of American film comedy from the silent era through the present day.  We will investigate the genre's evolution and its various subgenres (slapstick, farce, black comedy, teen comedy, etc.), the relationship between comedy and performance, and the artistic contributions of writers, directors and producers.

ELECTRONIC MEDIA CRITICISM
TVR-33500-61, 3 credits
Tuesdays 10:00am – 1:30pm, Dr. Stephen Tropiano

This course takes a critical look at television program from a variety of perspectives.  Students will develop and sharpen their critical viewing skills as they tackle such issues as television genres (sitcoms, reality, animation, etc.), gender representation, postmodernism, and race/sexuality. Among the list of programs to be screened include Seinfeld, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, Chappelle’s Show, Pee Wee’s Playhouse, The Simpsons, The Office, Ugly Betty, Torchwood, Sex and the City, Extras, and The Sopranos.

ORGANIZATIONAL SPEECH WRITING AND INTERVIEWING
STCM-31000-61, 3 credits
Thursdays 7:00pm – 10:00pm, Professor Donna Gotch

The role of the organizational communication specialist includes many functions, two of which are addressed in this course. The organizational interviewing function focuses on dyadic and group situations where information is gathered, evaluated, and sometimes shared, such as selection, appraisal, and focus group interviews. The organizational speech-writing function focuses also on the production and dissemination of information and includes audience analysis and manuscript writing. Students prepare and conduct interviews, write speeches, and critique both the execution and underlying dynamics of each.

MINI-COURSES:
One-credit mini-courses are also offered each semester. The one-credit classes are presented in the evenings, so they do not conflict with internship commitments. One-credit classes are scheduled and announced after the start of each semester.

Sample mini-courses include:

  • The Marketing of a Major Motion Picture

This course examines the process of marketing a motion picture. Topics to be covered are film distribution patterns, publicity, promotion, product placement, and post-opening marketing. The course examines the role of the exhibitor, market researcher, and media planner.

  • Film Development

This course will cover the stages of the development of a film project. Among the topics to be addressed include script notes, pitching, casting and marketing with guest speakers highlighting each of the stages.

  • The Music Industry

This course is an introduction to the music industry, emphasizing those areas that affect broadcasting and other forms of mass communication. Topics include the record business, radio music formats, trade magazines, music research, songwriting, music publishing, digital issues, and music licensing. 

  • Religion and Media: God and Faith on Television and Film

This course explores the role of religion in media and provides students with a greater understanding of the intersection between organized religion, spirituality, and the media, and how this intersection impacts contemporary American society.