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Posters and Election Propaganda

A blog dedicated to the examination of communications in election campaigns, with a focus on posters

Posted by Steven Seidman at 9:44AM   |  Add a comment
Posters with the name of the candidate glowing in the dark. (ITSUKI PRINT CO.)

Japanese voters go to the polls on December 14 to elect members of the Lower House of Representatives.

Unique "luminous" posters are going up. They are printed with a technology that allows the poster's paint to "store light during the daytime and illuminates for a few hours after dark," according to The Japan Times. There are also posters that reflect automobile headlights.

 


Posted by Steven Seidman at 8:12PM   |  Add a comment
Pro-Independence for Scotland Poster


The referendum on whether or not Scotland will be an independent country will take place on September 18, 2014.

Heated campaigns have been going on for months, both for and against independence from the United Kingdom, with Web sites, videos, and posters produced.

Here is a Web site with practically every medium advocating for independence: http://www.indyposterboy.info/better-together-scaremongering.asp 

And here is one that lists resources for the "Better Together" campaign: http://bettertogether.net/pages/resources

The latest polls indicate that the vote may be close: http://whatscotlandthinks.org/questions/should-scotland-be-an-independent-country-1#line


Posted by Steven Seidman at 3:07PM   |  Add a comment
Green Party Logo, Mexico

There are almost 100 Green political parties around the world. They have similar platforms, which frequently call for environmentalism, social justice, and non-nuclear energy.

The Greens have achieved some electoral successes in a number of countries, winning parliamentary seats in Australia, New Zealand, and several European nations. In the 2013 German elections, for example, the Greens received more than 8% of the vote, gaining 63 of the 631 seats in the Bundestag. In the United States, the Green Party's national ticket of Jill Stein and Cheri Honkala won less than 500,000 votes (about 0.5%) in 2012.

The logos of the Green parties are, of course, mainly green in color, and include a small number of symbols. The U.S. Green Party's logo has a globe inside a flower, as does that of England and many other green parties also incorporate a flower, including those in Portugal, Greece, and the Czech Republic. Other Green parties (in Latvia and Somalia, for instance) have a tree as the dominant symbol. And the Mexican party's logo has a toucan resting on a leaf inside a "V" (for "verde" or "green").


Posted by Steven Seidman at 5:41PM   |  Add a comment
Bachelet and her supporters (AP Photo/Luis Hidalgo)

Chile's presidential election takes place in about three weeks; U.S. voters go to the polls in about three years. One thing both countries have in common is that two women—both known by their first names (seen on their posters) are favored to become president, at present.

Former Chilean president Michelle Bachelet ("Michelle" on some posters) is a Socialist, who heads a seven-party coalition called "New Majority."  She is the daughter of a general tortured and killed by the Pinochet dictatorship. Bachelet was the first woman to hold the office of president in Chile, when she won a runoff election in 2005. She could not run for reelection, since presidents cannot hold office for consecutive terms.

According to Joshua Tucker, writing in The Washington Post, "pre-election polls makes it reasonable to assume that if she does not win in the first round (in which an absolute majority of the vote is required), she will win in the runoff" this time around. In the United States, a recent poll had Hillary Clinton ("Hillary" on most of her posters) as the overwhelming favorite to win the Democratic Party nomination for president in 2016 and to beat any Republican challenger.

To read about Chile's last presidential election, which resulted in the election of Sebastián Piñera, a conservative billionaire, in 2010, click here. For more on Chile's past election campaigns, click here. To learn more about election campaigns and poster propaganda in Chile and other countries in Latin America, see my book, Posters, Propaganda, and Persuasion in Election Campaigns Around the World and Through History.

 


Posted by Steven Seidman at 10:35AM   |  Add a comment
Christian Democratic Union Logo

The logos of today's political parties in many countries have become bland corporate identity pieces, similar to those of Sony, Panasonic, and RCA.

The German ones are particularly uninspired, with only one (Alliance 90/The Greens) adding a visual to the initials displayed. 

In other countries, visuals accompany the names of the parties. For example, the British Labour Party includes a socialist rose; the U.S. Republican Party incorporates an elephant; and the Workers Party of Ireland shows a handshake.  

The logos of the five German parties are:

  • Christian Democratic Union: a slanted "forward-moving" CDU; red on a white-background
  • Social Democratic Party: SPD; white on a red background
  • Free Democratic Party: FDP; blue on a yellow background, with "Die Liberalen" ("The Liberals") below
  • Alliance 90/The Greens: a yellow sunflower on a green background, with the parties' names in white
  • The Left: black letters on a gray background, with a red triangle above the "i"

Hopefully, the federal legislative elections scheduled for September will be more exciting!


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