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Posters and Election Propaganda

A blog dedicated to the examination of communications in election campaigns, with a focus on posters

Posted by Steven Seidman at 2:00PM   |  Add a comment
Posters handed out to people leaving Virginia Tea Party Patriots Convention in Richmond, Va., Oct. 9, 2010. Bob Brown/Richmond Times Dispatach/AP

 

Sharron Angle, Marco Rubio, Christine O'Donnell, Joe Miller, Ken Buck, Rand Paul, Pat Toomey, and Mike Lee—to name a few. These candidates are all supported by various Tea Party groups. All are Republicans and they are running for U.S. Senate seats in this November's elections. And all are ahead in the polls, or at least have a good chance of winning (except O'Donnell). At present, The FiveThirtyEight blog forecast gives the Republicans an 18 percent chance of gaining control of the Senate, picking up 7 seats (but not the 10 they need). But if the more enthusiastic anti-big-government independents, Tea-Party people, and Republicans turn out in droves, Republican candidates could win three additional Senate seats in Illinois, California, and West Virginia. In addition, there are well over 100 candidates for the House of Representatives who are supported by the Tea Party. FiveThirtyEight estimates that there is an 73 percent probability that the Republicans will take over the House, increasing the number of seats they hold by 48.

The Tea Party Republican candidates are running as "Washington outsiders" in a year when many voters are more negative about those in the nation's capital than usual—especially about the Democrats, who have been in charge in Congress for more than three years now. The Republicans are viewed negatively as well, but a bit less so, and there is some hope that they may spend and tax less—although many GOP representatives have not vowed to stop earmarking.  Other groups are allied with various Tea Party organizations. For example, members of the California Coalition for Immigration Reform have demonstrated with Los Angeles Tea Party members in support of Arizona's immigration law. Besides immigration, other issues that concern most Tea Partiers are the mushrooming national debt, the stimulus package, health care legislation, cap-and-trade proposals, tax hikes, government regulation, and a less-than-strict interpretation of the Constitution. 

The Tea Party posters—many of which are homemade—are numerous, and include slogans such as "Oh Yes We Can Vote You Out!" and "What the Hell Are You Doing With My Money?" The more professional-looking posters state things like "Less Government. More Freedom" and "Give Me Liberty...Not Debt!"

  

 


Posted by Steven Seidman at 7:35AM   |  Add a comment
Vote Yes on Proposition 19 Poster


California voters next month could approve a proposition to permit anyone 21 years or older to possess, cultivate, or transport marijuana for personal use. Right now, the polls show voters in favor of the proposition by six points. Proposition 19 would also allow local governments to regulate and tax the commercial production and sale of marijuana, but prohibit possession on school grounds and other public places, as well as smoking it in the presence of minors or providing it to anyone under 21 years old. Laws against the use of marijuana while driving would continue to be in force.

There are lots of posters for and against the initiative. Two of them are presented here. The use of the Sun in posters is common in political propaganda, with the goal to stimulate positive feelings about an issue or candidate. It is also present on a Web site put up by Prop 19 supporters: http://yeson19.com/. Here is a Web site in opposition: http://www.noonproposition19.com.

 

 


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