Blog

Posters and Election Propaganda About this blog

Posters and Election Propaganda

A blog dedicated to the examination of communications in election campaigns, with a focus on posters

Next » « Previous

Posted by Steven Seidman at 3:03PM   |  4 comments
Poster of Sonia Gandhi as the Hindu Goddess Durga (detail), Congress Party, India, 2007 (http://www.timesonline.co.uk)

Posters are widely used in election campaigns in India, even though the country is rapidly modernizing, and other media are becoming more common.

Recently, a city court ordered the political parties of New Delhi not to put up posters, leaving them without a viable means of propagandizing in the city's assembly elections. The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) general secretary Vijay Goel stated: "Before implementing the law, an alternative should be suggested. One cannot go for advertising alternatively, because it is very expensive." 

Some citizens were happy about the court's decision, since they consider posters to be an eyesore. One resident said, for instance: "It is so annoying to see these posters all over the city. They even paste the posters on houses in residential colonies. In Patel Nagar, they covered a public toilet fully in posters, so much that it was beyond recognition. This is not the way a civilised society lives."

Such advertising is evident all over India, with billboards promoting films dotting roads, and posters tacked on walls, taxis, and buses, making these media logical choices to promote candidates during election periods. One solution for the political parties is to display posters mainly in stores and homes. In fact, party headquarters distribute posters, banners, flags, handbills, and stickers to localities to give to owners of private establishments to put in wi. Posters have been prominent in marches and rallies in India, helping gain attention from onlookers, advertising meetings, and attracting media coverage.

Some posters draw attention, but damage the party and its leaders' standing with a segment of the population. Last year, the Congress Party issued a poster that showed Sonia Gandhi as a Hindu goddess. This poster was criticized because the party is secular and some perceived the imagery as insulting to Hinduism.

While candidates are usually featured on posters, sometimes issues are highlighted. The BJP, in 2004, for example, printed posters that included the image of a burning train, in which fifty-nine people died because of terrorism. Many Indian political consultants have reported that there has been a recent increase in emotionalism and negative campaign tactics in the country’s election campaigns.

The street poster is a medium to which many Indian campaign managers turn, so it will be problematic if their use is curtailed by the courts.  A survey found that 25 percent of managers rated posters as “exceptionally important” as a political advertising medium, behind rallies and daily newspapers (both 50 percent), public television (45 percent), and radio (41 percent). Private television (17 percent), direct mail (3 percent), and magazines (0 percent) trailed badly.


4 Comments

of course Bollywood is another big poster market, where life size pictures of famous stars deface walls everywhere. However, it will be really interesting to see the solution the parties come up with. In recent years people have used texting as a popular way for social messaging, so maybe that's the way the politicians will go.

I enjoyed reading the blog.....I can understand the agony of the resident when he talks about posters being pasted on walls of houses. It really is a spectacle during the elections....and most citizens have to bear the brunt of political parties, willy-nilly. The court's decision is a step in the right direction, however, an alternative suggestion... Read More definitely needs to be made....maybe blogging would be a good idea?

I see the agony to.

i have an objection on congress party poster, Soniya Gandhi show as an goddess Durga . It not a good thing it's hurt the hindu's feeling's. You can show them in different form, colors with illustration and good graphic compositions.



Next » « Previous

You can follow posts to this blog using the RSS 2.0 feed .

You can see all of the tags in this blog in the tag cloud.

This blog is powered by the Ithaca College Web Profile Manager.

Archives

more...


Roy H. Park School of Communications  ·  311 Park Hall  ·  Ithaca College  ·  Ithaca, NY 14850  ·  (607) 274-1021  ·  Full Directory Listing