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Posters and Election Propaganda

A blog dedicated to the examination of communications in election campaigns, with a focus on posters

Tagged as “Tea Party”

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Posted by Steven Seidman at 2:00PM   |  Add a comment
Posters handed out to people leaving Virginia Tea Party Patriots Convention in Richmond, Va., Oct. 9, 2010. Bob Brown/Richmond Times Dispatach/AP

 

Sharron Angle, Marco Rubio, Christine O'Donnell, Joe Miller, Ken Buck, Rand Paul, Pat Toomey, and Mike Lee—to name a few. These candidates are all supported by various Tea Party groups. All are Republicans and they are running for U.S. Senate seats in this November's elections. And all are ahead in the polls, or at least have a good chance of winning (except O'Donnell). At present, The FiveThirtyEight blog forecast gives the Republicans an 18 percent chance of gaining control of the Senate, picking up 7 seats (but not the 10 they need). But if the more enthusiastic anti-big-government independents, Tea-Party people, and Republicans turn out in droves, Republican candidates could win three additional Senate seats in Illinois, California, and West Virginia. In addition, there are well over 100 candidates for the House of Representatives who are supported by the Tea Party. FiveThirtyEight estimates that there is an 73 percent probability that the Republicans will take over the House, increasing the number of seats they hold by 48.

The Tea Party Republican candidates are running as "Washington outsiders" in a year when many voters are more negative about those in the nation's capital than usual—especially about the Democrats, who have been in charge in Congress for more than three years now. The Republicans are viewed negatively as well, but a bit less so, and there is some hope that they may spend and tax less—although many GOP representatives have not vowed to stop earmarking.  Other groups are allied with various Tea Party organizations. For example, members of the California Coalition for Immigration Reform have demonstrated with Los Angeles Tea Party members in support of Arizona's immigration law. Besides immigration, other issues that concern most Tea Partiers are the mushrooming national debt, the stimulus package, health care legislation, cap-and-trade proposals, tax hikes, government regulation, and a less-than-strict interpretation of the Constitution. 

The Tea Party posters—many of which are homemade—are numerous, and include slogans such as "Oh Yes We Can Vote You Out!" and "What the Hell Are You Doing With My Money?" The more professional-looking posters state things like "Less Government. More Freedom" and "Give Me Liberty...Not Debt!"

  

 


Posted by Steven Seidman at 5:00PM   |  Add a comment
Your Party Logo

The Japanese now has a movement similar to the U.S. tea-party movement, but in their country, there is a real political party to vote for.

The party is called "Minna no Tō," which means "Everyone's Party" in English, although I have usually seen it referred to as "Your Party." The party is a new one—founded less than a year ago by politicians who left the Liberal Democratic Party.

The party stands for lower taxes, less regulation, aid to small businesses, and less government intervention.

In the election held this past Sunday, Your Party garnered ten seats in the upper house in parliament (still well below the main parties' numbers).

Your Party leader Yoshimi Watanabe stated after the vote that his group would not join the ruling coalition: "I think the prime minister should gracefully step down—a political gesture that would be in line with the results of the election."

"Forming a coalition is out of the question," Watanabe said. "Your Party is all about agenda, and we can't cooperate with a party with a different agenda. But we can coordinate in areas where our agendas are consistent."

 

Source: The Japan Timeshttp://search.japantimes.co.jp/rss/nn20100713a2.html
 


Posted by Steven Seidman at 9:25AM   |  1 comment
Maksim, "Banana Republic" (2009) (http://imaksim.com)

Steven Heller, writing in his Daily Heller blog, has an interesting piece on posters to promote the Tea Party movement, as well as on anti-Obama designs (many of which are from The People's Cube Web site), which include Pelosi, Reid, and Obama as "The Three Stooges"; the "Tree of Liberty" symbol and the message "don't give me DEBT"; and Obama as "El Presidente of the Banana Republic of the United States."

Just as propaganda of the left can smear the opposition and distort positions, so, too, can propaganda of the right. As Heller states:

The transposition of Obama as a Soviet/Red...and the smearing of the Democratic party as Marxist...shows a decided lack of imagination and historical knowledge. First, socialism as a practice (i.e. Sweden) and Soviet Communism (remember the breakup of the Soviet Union) are quite different political beasts. Representing the Obama administration with the hammer and sickle is as stupid as smearing it with a swastika...Just as George W. Bush was not a Nazi for starting the Iraqi War, President Barack Obama is not a "commie-fascist" for advocating a government-subsidized health care plan.

Check out the poster designs on The People's Cube, and comment on the designs and messages.


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