Administration and Services

Assisting Students at Risk

The mission of the Assisting Students at Risk (ASR) Initiative is to provide a central place for faculty, staff and students to communicate concerns when the well-being of a student or the safety of the campus community is an issue and to provide information and education to the campus community about risk issues and resources.

The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Campus Life has been identified as the central repository of all information. The Associate Vice President of Student Affairs and Campus Life or his designee will conduct an investigation and determine when other intervention team members should be called.  Appropriate interventions will be decided on a case-by-case basis.

Goals

The goals of the ASR focus on timely identification and intervention for students and read as follows:

  • identify students-at-risk because of behavioral problems (psychological, personal/interpersonal)
  • decrease the likelihood of personal and community crisis situations
  • preempt problems caused by lack of information about resources
  • evaluate the need for early intervention with identified students
  • coordinate appropriate referrals
  • provide guidance to students with concerns about their peers regarding where to direct their concerns
  • strengthen campus-wide responsiveness to mental health and safety needs

Goals are not focused on retention or treatment, though that may be an outcome of intervention.

Acknowledgements: We appreciate the wealth of information gathered from various websites of colleges and universities across the country. Two documents in particular provided information and organization that we have adapted for use in assisting students at risk at Ithaca College: Helping Students in Distress, from the University of Connecticut and Violence Prevention and Crisis/Emergency Information for Faculty, from Central Michigan University.  University of Connecticut http://www.dos.uconn.edu/helping_students/index.html and Central Michigan University http://www.facit.cmich.edu/crisis/violence.shtml