Title

Current Semester Courses

FALL 2020 

If you experience enrollment issues in HOMER with any of our courses, please let the instructor for that course know.

PHILOSOPHY (R=Thursday)

PHIL 10100-01,-03 Introduction to Philosophy 1 HM HU LA LMSP TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu<mailto:kaufmanf@ithaca.edu>
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Any.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce students to basic philosophical methods and problems. Topics to be covered include the existence/nonexistence of God, theory of knowledge, the mind/body problem, theories of moral obligation and social and political organization.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three exams, final exam, class presentation and class participation.

PHIL 10100-02,-05,-07 Introduction to Philosophy HM HU LA LMSP LSCO TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 43077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on perennial philosophical problems including: (1) Can I survive my death? (2) Am I free? (3) What is the relationship between the mind and the body? (4) Does God exist? (5) What ought we to do? We will read mostly contemporary philosophical works.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Mixture of lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation, papers, exams.

PHIL 10100-04,-06 Introduction to Philosophy HM HU LA LMSP LSCO TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 4-5713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course introduces the students to the discipline by featuring a selection of classical readings and arguments pertaining to the problems of knowledge, morality, free will, individuality and authenticity.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams; quizzes; participation.

PHIL 20300-01,-02 Introduction to Logic ESTS HM LA LMEL LMSP LSCO NS QL TWOS
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place 141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu 
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC,
CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG. 
STUDENTS: Any. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce the students to the fundamentals of formal reasoning. 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Four exams.

PHIL 20800-01 Puzzles and Paradoxes HU LA WI
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 43077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST
COURSE DESCRIPTION: One of the central aims of philosophy is to aim for extreme conceptual clarity. Paradoxes are areas where our conceptual resources are stretched to their limits. The puzzles that we deal with in this class are sets of propositions each member of which is intuitively true but logic tells us at least one of which must be false. Possible topics include paradoxes of space and time; paradoxes of decision-making; ethical paradoxes; paradoxes of belief and knowledge; and paradoxes of logic and set theory.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Mixture of lecture and discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation, papers, essay exams.

PHIL 21200-01 Introduction to Ethics 1 HM HU LA LMSP TIDE
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to the problems and theories of normative and critical ethics. Readings are selected from both classical and contemporary sources. We will consider a wide range of contemporary moral issues, such as abortion, war, capital punishment, the treatment of animals, and aid to the needy.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 3 exams, final exam, short written assignments (class participation too); traditional grading.

PHIL 22300-01 Introduction to the Philosophy of Art HM HU LA TIII
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 4-5713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course examines some of the central questions in contemporary philosophy of art pertaining to topics such as the value of art, the nature of artistic expression, and the relationship between art and society.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Tests, quizzes, class participation.

PHIL 23000-01 Bioethics ENHU ESHU HM INBG LA LMEL LMSP LSCO TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing, or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course in biomedical ethics. The developments in biomedical science that occurred in the course of the XX century have opened the door to some important philosophical problems: When – if at all – is it morally appropriate to terminate a pregnancy? Are doctors morally justified in helping patients to end their lives? Is it morally permissible to change the genetic make-up of our children? Is cloning morally objectionable? To what extent should the state be allowed to legislate over issues such as these? The course in bioethics is meant to acquaint you with some key arguments, perspectives, ideas, and positions that philosophers have developed concerning these questions. While the course does not promise to give simple answers to these questions, it will aim at helping you to acquire the philosophical skills necessary to develop such answers. You will learn how to read and to understand philosophical texts dealing with issues in bioethics, how to parse and to assess philosophical arguments, and how to come up with both critical and constructive arguments of your own.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, group-work, debate.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams (midterm and the final), research paper (10 pages long), weekly contributions to Sakai discussion board; grading based on the preceding requirements; attendance and participation will be taken into consideration.

PHIL 31100-01 Philosophy of Religion HU LA LMSP
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: All who meet the prerequisite are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The philosophy of religion aims at critical understanding of the fundamental concepts and doctrines widely held by religious beliefs of various types.  It also aims to discover what reasons we have for believing or disbelieving those doctrines.  In pursuit of these aims, this course will examine philosophical discussions (by thinkers past and present) of such topics as:  the attributes of God (in both Western and Eastern thought), arguments for and against God’s existence, religious experience, the possibility of life after death, the contrast between faith and reason, and religious pluralism. Please note: PHIL-31100 is cross-listed with RLST-31100. Students may not earn credit for both PHIL-31100 and RLST-31100.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures and discussions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, papers, participation.

PHIL 35000-01 Philosophy of Science HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Park Hall 243, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: PHIL-20300 or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: Philosophy majors and minors. Advanced majors in any of the sciences. Note: Prof. Klee is willing to waive some of the prerequisites for otherwise qualified students. Contact Prof. Klee directly if you are interested in an override that waives some of the prerequisites. Waivers will be determined on a case-by-case basis and at the discretion of the instructor.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is a comprehensive survey of issues in the philosophical foundations of science. Topics to be covered include: The structure and function of scientific theories, the debate over the existence of theoretical entities, holistic models of science, reductionism and antireductionism, models of scientific explanation, Kuhnian historicism and social constructivist models of science, and the contemporary reemergence of the realism/antirealism dispute.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion.

PHIL 38400-01 Existentialism GERM HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: One course in philosophy; two additional courses in humanities or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines (who meet the prerequisites) are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on the XX-C existentialism, and will mostly deal with the philosophical (not literary) works of Heidegger and Sartre. We will relate the thought of the XX-C existentialists to the phenomenological tradition (especially to Husserl). We will not explicitly address the thought of the pre-cursors to existentialism (such as Kierkegaard and Nietzsche). The students should expect to do a fair bit of reading (about 40 pages of primary sources, and 20 pages of secondary literature per week).
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three papers (3-page summary paper, 4-page compare-and-contrast paper, and 10-page research paper); weekly contributions to electronic discussion board; grading based on the preceding requirements; attendance and participation will be taken into consideration.

RELIGION (R=Thursday)

RLST 10300-01 Hebrew Scriptures 3A H HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits 
INSTRUCTOR: Rebecca Lesses, Muller 413, Ext. 43556, rlesses@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None. 
STUDENTS: All students interested in learning more about the Bible. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The Hebrew Bible (referred to by Christians as the Old Testament) is one of the foundational books of both western and world culture, and serves as the basis for Judaism and Christianity. In this course, we will read the books of the Bible critically as literature, as religious and moral text, and as a source of sociological knowledge. This course surveys the biblical literature, acquaints the students with critical methods for the study of the Bible, situates the Bible within the literature and culture of the ancient Near East, and discusses the religion of ancient Israel. We will deal with questions of history and archaeology, and with questions of meaning—what the biblical text meant to its ancient readers, and what meaning it has today. RLST-10300 is cross-listed with JWST-10300. A student may not earn credit for both RLST-10300 and JWST-10300. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Readings, lectures, discussions (both in the class and in student study groups), and student presentations. 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings will include the Bible and The Old Testament: A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures, by Michael D. Coogan and Cynthia R. Chapman (4th edition)
Grading: A-F.

RLST 10500-01,-02 Introduction to World Religions: Indigenous and Eastern 1 G H HM HU LA NACI TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Eric Steinschneider, Rothschild Place 139, Ext. 45802, esteinschneider@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Recommended for religion minors, this course is open to all students interested in the subject matter.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will discuss perennial religious themes such as the questions of ultimate orientation and meaning as they have been addressed by indigenous members of shamanic cultures and eastern (Hindu, Buddhist, Taoist,) religious cultures. The contemporary interest in the visionary, shamanic, and meditative aspects of these cultures will be analyzed in terms of the academic study of religion.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, class discussion, and films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Reading and class discussion emphasized; two exams, reading-journals. Reading list may include:
Roger Walsh, The World of Shamanism;
John Neihardt, Black Elk Speaks;
Damien Keown, Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction;
Joanna Macy, Widening Circles: A Memoir;
Thich Nhat Hahn, Being Peace.
Letter grade based on exams, journal-writings, and class discussions.

RLST 10600-01 Introduction to World Religions: Western and Modern 1 G H HM HU INBG LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Rachel Wagner, Rothschild Place 111, Ext. 43249, rwagner@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces the academic study of religion through exploration of the historical development of the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions. Emphasizes how religious beliefs and practices evolve in response to historic events and changing cultural contexts, including the challenges posed by modernity and postmodernity.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: TBA.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBA.

RLST 10600-02 Introduction to World Religions: Western and Modern 1 G H HM HU INBG LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Samah Choudhury, Rothschild Place 109, Ext. 41585, schoudhury@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces the academic study of religion through exploration of the historical development of the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions. Emphasizes how religious beliefs and practices evolve in response to historic events and changing cultural contexts, including the challenges posed by modernity and postmodernity.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: TBA.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBA.

RLST 24000-01,-02 Writing About Religion: Heaven and Hell HU LA WI
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Samah Choudhury, Rothschild Place 109, Ext. 41585, schoudhury@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 18 per section
PREREQUISITES: WRTG 10600, ICSM 108xx, or ICSM 118xx.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Explores two thousand years of the history of heaven and hell with a focus on human meaning-making in religious practice, poetry, art, and digital media. Includes significant attention to the development of research and writing skills in the humanities.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: TBD

RLST 27503-01 Selected Topics in Religion: History of Apocalypse DV HU LA 
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Rachel Wagner, Rothschild Place 111, Ext. 43249, rwagner@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One liberal arts course in any of the following departments: ANTH, ARTH, CMST, CLTC, CSCR, ECON, EDUC, ENGL, GERO, HIST, JWST, LGST, PHIL, POLT, PSYC, RLST, SOCI, WGST, WRTG.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this seminar, we will explore the Book of Revelation as a foundational text in order to see how its controversial portrait of ultimate endings has shaped religious and political thinking ever since. We will we begin with antiquity, as we focus in particular on views of time, representations of women, and views about conflict. We will then move to contemporary challenges in the form of Islamic apocalypticism, secular apocalypticism, and the mediation of apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic themes in popular culture (The Walking Dead; Falling Skies; You, Me, and the Apocalypse; World War Z, TheFallout series of videogames, etc.). We will end the course by exploring cosmopolitanism as an alternative perspective to the divisiveness of the apocalyptic vision.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar-style discussion. 
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Short responses, take-home essays, and one focused research paper.

RLST 31100-01 Philosophy of Religion HU LA LMSP
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: At least one 20000-level PHIL course or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: All who meet the prerequisite are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The philosophy of religion aims at critical understanding of the fundamental concepts and doctrines widely held by religious beliefs of various types.  It also aims to discover what reasons we have for believing or disbelieving those doctrines.  In pursuit of these aims, this course will examine philosophical discussions (by thinkers past and present) of such topics as:  the attributes of God (in both Western and Eastern thought), arguments for and against God’s existence, religious experience, the possibility of life after death, the contrast between faith and reason, and religious pluralism. Please note: PHIL-31100 is cross-listed with RLST-31100. Students may not earn credit for both PHIL-31100 and RLST-31100.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures and discussions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, papers, participation.