Title

The associate lighting designer job is to aid the designer in the mechanics of the design, as determined by the faculty mentor, as well as to observe and learn from the process of the design by participating in all aspects of the process with reflective journals required.

Assistant LD’s must cc’d the faculty mentor on all correspondence regarding the production lighting.

All work will be posted to Sakai.

DESIGN PROCESS

The lighting design process moves through the events as specified in the formalized design process. Every Lighting Designer will also follow their own design process as they see fit. Below is the process as outlined in the lighting curriculum. (All due dates are specified in the production calendar.)  Meeting all deadlines is absolutely essential.

Design Meeting 1: ANALYTICAL WORK

ALD only)How does the designer react and respond to the director’s comment?

How does the designer consider and move forward with those comments to readjust/reassess their research/ideas? What kind of research would you have to support this world that is being         constructed? 

Design Meeting 2: RESEARCH 

Consider the research that the SD and CD are presenting. What does it say about the word of the play? What additional research could you do that might propel the process forward? Describe the communication between the designers & director(s). What does the director respond to? What doesn’t the director respond to? In what ways does the LD effectively communicate with the director? What kind of dialogue is established for lighting within the world of the play?

What kind of research would you have to support this world that is being constructed? 

Design Meeting 3: ROUGH IDEAS

Consider the ideas that the SD and CD are presenting. How do they address what the director was interested in? How do they not? What would you have done differently? What additional research could you do that might propel the process forward? Describe the communication between the designers & director(s). What does the director respond to? What doesn’t the director respond to? Given the set ideas - what role can lighting play at this point?

Design Meeting 4: REFINED IDEAS 

Consider the ideas that the SD is presenting. How do they address what the director was interested in? How do they not? What would you have done differently? What additional research could you do that might propel the process forward? Describe the communication between the designers & director(s). What does the director respond to? What doesn’t the director respond to? Given the set ideas - what role can lighting play at this point? Think about set practicals and practicals within the world of the play set by the scenic designer at this point.

Design Meeting 5: FIRST LOOKS 

Consider the ideas that the SD and CD are presenting. How do they address what the director was interested in? How do they not? What would you have done differently? What additional research could you do that might propel the process forward? Describe the communication between the designers & director(s). What does the director respond to? What doesn’t the director respond to? Given the set ideas - what role can lighting play at this point? If anything has changed how from 4-5 due to budget, etc with scenery how do you plan to fix and adapt to the changing world within your ideas?

Design Meeting 6: HANDOFF

STORYBOARDS

The designer will articulate the script needs, the aims of the light, small system diagrams and do visual research for each environment.  These should be formatted like the “Storyboards” from the Lighting I Handbook. The designer will talk through the show in terms of intention prior to submission to the faculty LD. These must be approved by the faculty LD prior to moving to the next phase.  The ALD will do the same - but only present to the faculty LD.

1 Week Prior to Rough Plot (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

COMBINED SYSTEMS LIST

The designer will then begin to flesh out these ideas in terms of direction and color. These ideas might need to be worked out in Studio II or in the lighting lab.  This list must be shared with the faculty LD prior to the student moving forward.

AREA BREAK DOWN & CONCEPTUAL HOOK-UP

The designer will then move toward producing a conceptual hookup based upon the ground plan obtained from the set designer. The designer will ensure that these ideas are within the inventory of the space.

WORKSHEETS

The designer will then explore the space and the set and determine the proper fixture choice and placement for every idea.

CUE LIST    

During this period the lighting designer is expected to generate a rough cue list. The director must be fully aware of the cue list prior to the paper tech.

ROUGH PLOT (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

  • Research
  • Systems list
  • Conceptual hookup
  • Any worksheet questions
  • Thoughts on practicals & special effects
  • Requests for Follow Spots or other labor implications

    ALD: What questions do you have the lighting design? Does it provide for the intentions that the LD is trying to achieve? Does it support the story discussed in the design phase? Where are there missed opportunities?

PRELIM PLOT (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

  • Rough plot
  • Rough section
  • Rough Details (if applicable)
  • Rough Lightwright hookup, inventory of units, inventory of color, inventory of templates
  • Rough Magic Sheet

    ALD: What questions do you have the lighting design? Do the drawings clearly communicate the intentions of the design? How might they do so in a clearer way?

LIGHTING PACKAGE (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

  • Completed 1/2” scale light plot
  • Completed 1/2” scale center line section
  • Completed 1/2” scale detail drawing including all booms and set mounts
  • Lightwright hookup, inventory of units, inventory of color, inventory of templates
  • Rough Magic Sheet

    ALD: What questions do you have the lighting design? Do the drawings clearly communicate the intentions of the design? How might they do so in a clearer way?

HANG (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

Designers will be available to answer any questions and make multiple visits to the stage to look at progress, discuss any issues and resolve any conflicts as they arise.

PRE-TECH MEETING WITH MENTOR (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

At some point after the light plot is submitted and before focus you must make an appointment with me to go over your magic sheet & cue list and discuss an approach to focus.

FOCUS (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

Designers will be given a specific focus date and time. All focusing will be done during that time. The master electrician will have been informed that the show must be ready to focus the day before the first focus call and will be prepared to do a channel check with the lighting designer and the lighting advisor at that time. Focus time is meant to be used only for focusing - not for finishing the hanging and patching of equipment. The designer should know where each light is to be focused and have the proper paperwork prepared in order to focus as quickly and efficiently as possible.  The designer should show up to the focus at least 10 minutes early and have taped out all focus points prior to this time and day.  The Master Electrician will run the remote-focus unit and will track all changes on the hook-up and plot.

PAPER-TECH (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

Designers will be present to relay all cue information (placement and nomenclature) to stage management.  This is NOT a time to discuss the finer ascetics of the light, but rather to get the information in order in the stage managers book.  The design conversation with the lighting designer and director should happen outside of this meeting and in more detail.

LIGHT-OVER REHEARSAL (optional and with director approval) | (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

Designers may want to take the last run-through before tech to light over rehearsal.  This is meant to be the director’s rehearsal - with the lighting designer looking at ideas over the top.  At this point it is essential that the designer become familiar with the focus and color choices and begun to understand how those will be used to accomplish the needs of the production as discussed.

LIGHTING LEVELS & DARK TIME (optional and director dependent) | (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

Some directors may want to look at the lighting before technical rehearsals.  If this is so, the designer will have programmed ideas into the board PRIOR to this meeting.  If this is something you and your director are interested in pursuing - you must voice this desire EARLY in the scheduling process.   It is very difficult to carve out the time in the theatre as well as arrange for a board operator and people to walk the stage for you.

TECHNICAL REHEARSALS

Designer will be prepared with updated Magic Sheets, Cue Lists and Follow Spot Cue Lists.  The designer will take their own technical notes unless other arrangements have been made.

POST REHEARSAL PRODUCTION MEETINGS

At the end of each technical rehearsal there will be a production meeting where the director will be able to give notes to the entire production team.  After this, the designer and master electrician will meet to develop a list of notes in order of priority for the following day.

NOTE SESSIONS & DARK TIME

During the day before each technical rehearsal - the designer will be present at all note calls to accomplish any focus notes and answer any questions that arise.   

OPENING

Upon opening, the designer will present stage management with an updated channel hook-up, magic sheets & cue list.

BEFORE THE END OF THE SEMESTER (LD Only, ALD not responsible for the following)

Each lighting designer must turn in an updated lighting package and schedule a post-mortem with the lighting mentor.  No grade will be submitted until the receipt of this document.

This package will include the following

  1. Updated Plot
  2. Updated Section
  3. Updated Hookup
  4. Updated Magic Sheet
  5. Updated Cue List
  6. 8x10 Photo of Production
  7. Self Evaluation

Evaluations of the master electrician, lighting supervisor and assistant lighting designer (if appropriate) should be completed and returned to the department technical director at the end of the semester.

ATTENDANCE POLICY

Missing any due date or scheduled meeting can be grounds for being pulled from the production and failing the course.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING POLICY

Grading is based on the 4.0 scale as articulated in the Undergraduate Catalogue.  Grades will be assigned on the basis of analysis, research, degree of completion, appropriateness and coherence of design, and how effectively your ideas were communicated.

For THEA 21000 & 31000:  Theatre Production II & III

  • Supervisory Skills* (20-25%) This includes not only the hands on management of your crew members, but also includes interpersonal and collaborative skills. Your crew must be notified in writing, and on crew call board, 24 hours in advance of any and every crew call.  You must be prepared and utilize your crew efficiently.
  • Dedication and Professionalism (20-25%)  This includes reliability, commitment, collaboration, interpersonal skills, health/stamina and creativity
  • Management Skills (20-25%)  These includes organizational skills, time management skills, promptness, interpersonal skills, problem solving, analytical skills, and the ability to deal calmly and rationally with stressful situations,
  • Aesthetics and Craftsmanship (20-25%)  This includes demonstrated creative and conceptual skills, craftsmanship, attention to detail, growth in the area of aesthetics and the ability to set and maintain the quality of the production.  This also will include all paperwork deliverables.
  • Attitude (20-25%) This includes a demonstrated reliable, positive, productive and collaborative attitude toward the project; toward everyone involved on the project, to the department of Theatre Arts and to the Art of Theatre. You must also demonstrate the ability to take direction and criticism.  You also must demonstrate desire, passion, focus and drive for the project, the department and the art form.  This also includes your final evaluation that you will submit to me.

For THEA 41000: Theatre Production IV

  • Light Plot Deliverables* (20-25%) This includes all associated paperwork that you submit.
  • Dedication and Professionalism (20-25%)  This includes reliability, commitment, collaboration, interpersonal skills, health/stamina and creativity
  • Production Process (20-25%)  These includes organizational skills, time management skills, promptness, interpersonal skills, problem solving, analytical skills, and the ability to deal calmly and rationally with stressful situations, and how you work through the production process
  • Aesthetics and Craftsmanship (20-25%)  This includes demonstrated creative and conceptual skills, craftsmanship, attention to detail, growth in the area of aesthetics and the ability to set and maintain the quality of the production.
  • Final Self Evaluation (20-25%)

ITHACA COLLEGE THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT

Lighting Designer Self-Evaluation

Note:  You will not receive a grade until this document is submitted and you have scheduled a meeting for a post show discussion with me.

Final Deliverables to faculty LD.  (all in letter format if possible)

In a Binder:

  • Updated Plot
  • Updated Section
  • Updated Hookup
  • Updated Magic Sheet
  • Updated Cue List
  • 8x10 Photo of Production

Print outs for Faculty to keep:

  • Updated Plot, Section & Elevations (8.5” Reduction)
  • Updated Hookup
  • Updated Magic Sheet
  • Updated Cue List
  • 8x10 Photo of Production
  • Self Evaluation

Self Evaluation (typed document answering the following questions)

    1.    Evaluate you conceptual process.

  • Do you feel you were an active member of the design team?  If so how?  If not, what would you do different next time?
  • How did you articulate your ideas the director and the other design members?  (Did you find that your research communicated what you wanted, or did you find yourself describing your ideas?)
  • Did your initial conception of the piece translate into final ideas on stage?
  • What do you want to remember to incorporate next time you design?
  • What would you have done differently?

    2.    Evaluate your plot development process.

  • How did your ideas about the play translate into fixture and color specification?
  • Did your worksheet work?  If so what was most valuable?  If not, why?
  • What about the process can be streamlined for next time?
  • What about the process needs more of your attention next time?

    3.    Evaluate your tech process.

  • How was your relationship with your ME?
  • Did your drawings answer most of the questions that arose?  If not, where were they insufficient?
  • Did you feel in control of out of control during tech?  If in control – what in your preparatory process aided this?  If out of control, what can you do differently in your prep next time to avoid this?
  • At focus, did you feel your worksheets informed you decision making process?  If not, what needs to change about your worksheet prep?
  • How was your relationship with your Director at the tech table?  Do you feel you were speaking the same language?  If not, what can you do next time to ensure you are both on the same page?
  • Do you feel you were able to keep your cue list up to date during tech?  If not, what needs to change for this to be so?
  • How do you feel about how you divided up your time between cueing and work notes?
  • How do you feel about your priorities for each day?  Did you have a clear sense of what was more important to do and in what order?
  • What would you have done differently?

    4.    Evaluate the mentorship process.

  • Are there moments when you felt I was not present enough?
  • Are there moments when you felt I was too present?
  • Are there things I can do for future designers that you think would be helpful to the process of learning the art and craft of lighting design?

5.     Develop a Critical Eye

You are also required to see one additional performance and take notes (that you may not do) and submit a minimum of 20 of these notes to me to discuss at your post show discussion.