CMST & CLTC Courses: Spring 2016

Department of Communication Studies Spring 2016

Three programs are offered through the Department of Communication Studies:
• Communication Studies-CMST: a major and a minor. Students are admitted following an interview with the department chairperson.
• Culture and Communication-CLTC: a major. Students are admitted following an interview
with the program coordinator.

The BACHELOR OF ARTS in Communication Studies and the BACHELOR OF ARTS in Culture and Communication are recommended for students who want a broad liberal arts background as preparation for possible careers in public relations, business, law, education, government, social services, and other professions, or for graduate study.

All courses in the area of Communication Studies are open to non-majors, although some upper level courses have prerequisites.

Culture and Communication Courses

CLTC 10000 All sections: Introduction Culture and Communication LA
NOTE: This course fulfills the Identities Theme requirement for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTORS:
Section 01: Özge Girit Heck, Job Hall 212, Ext. 4-3035
Section 02: Donathan Brown, Muller 432, Ext. 4-7335
Sections 03 & 04: Christopher House, Muller 429, Ext. 4-3216
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores the contribution from various perspectives within the Communication Studies tradition toward studying the relationship between culture and communication. To this end, students will be exposed to areas of inquiry complimenting the rise of cosmopolitanism. With specificity in mind, this course will cover such relationships as, (1) cultural forces and trends producing and defining cosmopolitanism (2) the cultural, racial and socio-political aspects present within cosmopolitan studies and (3) how these forces and trends are challenging dominant models of knowledge.

CLTC 11000–01 Media Literacy and Popular Culture 1 LA SS
NOTE: This course fulfills the Humanities prospective with the Inquiry, Imagination, & Innovation Theme requirement for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Cyndy Scheibe, Williams 115B, Ext. 4-1324
ENROLLMENT: 60
PREREQUISTIES: Open to freshmen and sophomores only.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice of media literacy with an emphasis on developing skills in analysis and evaluation of media messages, as well as an understanding of critical thinking and the mediated communication process. Using an interdisciplinary approach that draws from many fields (especially communications, psychology, and education), the course includes analyses of messages from both traditional (e.g., print, TV, film) and digital (e.g., websites, social media) formats, drawn from both popular and educational media, and examines the effects of media messages on beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Working individually and in small groups, students also create their own media messages, while reflecting on their roles as media producers and the impact of their messages on others.

Communication Studies Courses

CMST 11000 - All sections: Public Communication 3A HU LA
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTORS:
Section 01: Scott Thomson, Job Hall 211, Ext. 4-3670
Section 02: Özge Girit Heck, Job Hall 212, Ext. 4-3035
Sections 03, 04: Colleen Budzinski, Rothschild 122, Ext. 4-7398
ENROLLMENT: 18 each section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To improve students' ability to organize thought for communicative purposes; to develop students' confidence, spontaneity, and extemporaneous style in one-to-many oral communication situations; to encourage students’ development and use of logical argument supported by evidence in persuasive communication attempts both inside and outside the classroom setting; to increase students' sensitivity to appropriate and inappropriate language use, and nonverbal communication stimuli; to assist students’ choice of appropriate message content, organization and style for a variety of audience situations; to stimulate development of critical listening skills for use inside and outside the classroom as communication receiver-consumer.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Approximately 50% class time is lecture discussion; 50% class time is speech making and critical listening.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Attendance is required. Students must participate in discussion, speaking, and critical listening. Speeches and outlines. Other requirements to be announced.

CMST 11500 - All sections: Business and Professional Communication HU LA
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTORS:
Sections 01, 02, 03: Ann Byrne, Job Hall 213, Ext. 4-1124
Sections 04, 05: Heather Brecht, Rothschild Place 126, Ext. 4-3429
Sections 06, 07: David Smith, Rothschild Place 126, Ext. 4-6442
Sections 08, 09: E. Christine Thompson, Job Hall 211, Ext. 4-3670
ENROLLMENT: 20 each section (except the online course enrollment is: 18)
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students who have an interest in developing their professional skills.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will be provided with opportunities to develop their skills at business and professional communication in a variety of forms. Specifically, they will learn to effectively prepare and deliver oral presentations, work in small groups, participate in interviews as either the interviewer or interviewee, listen actively and critically to the presentations of others, and maintain good interpersonal relationships in the workplace. Some instruction may also be provided in writing effective résumés and business letters.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Student presentations, lectures, in-class discussions and exercises.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Presentations, exams, attendance and participation.

CMST 12000-01 Communication, Culture, and Rhetoric 1 HU LA
NOTE: This course fulfills the Humanities prospective with the Identities Theme requirement for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Sullivan, Muller 417, Ext. 4-3930
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Cultures create ideas, identities and actions through speeches, films, music, rituals and other forms of communication. This course provides students with a theoretical vocabulary for critically evaluating public communication and its role in our culture(s). The critical vocabulary that organizes the course is drawn from neo-Classical Rhetoric, Semiotics, Narrative, Dramatistic, and Psychoanalytic Theories. Students will use the theoretical concepts to gain insight into the effects, effectiveness, truth, and ethics of communication.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture-discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Coursepack, papers, participation, regular quizzes.

CMST 12400-01 Courtrooms and Communication 1 HU LA
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Whelan, Muller 415, Ext. 4-3542
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITE: None
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Courtrooms and Communication provides an active introduction to law and advocacy as human, not technical, phenomena. The course is conducted around in-class discussions, readings and media, and participation in mock trials. The key concepts stressed in this course are advocacy, evidence, burdens of proof, judgment, conduct of trial, legal proceedings as theater, juries as decision making groups, the ethical responsibilities of advocates, and legal reasoning. Courtrooms and Communication is a required course in the Legal Studies Major.

CMST 13200-01, 02 Storytelling 3B FA LA
NOTE: This course fulfills the Humanities prospective with the Inquiry, Imagination, & Innovation Theme requirement for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Regina Carpenter, Rothschild Place 107, Ext. 4-1546
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITE: None
STUDENTS: Open to all students at Ithaca College. No previous performance experience required. Students of Theatre Arts, English, School of Communications, Anthropology, Sociology, and Recreation should find the course of particular interest.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course on storytelling in contemporary society. The course will provide basic training in the art and craft of storytelling and will examine and analyze storytelling in a variety of cultures, settings, and contexts. While learning at least three stories during the semester, you will also learn about yourself as a performer, and will explore your own personal, family, and cultural identity.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Combination of lecture-discussion and workshop-performance rounds.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three storytelling performances, weekly written response papers, class participation, and a written study of storytelling in everyday life.

CMST 14000-01 Small Group Communication 1 LA SS
This course fulfills the Humanities prospective with the Identities Theme and the World of Systems Theme requirements for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Ann Byrne, Job Hall 213, Ext. 4-1067
ENROLLMENT: 24
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide you with the opportunity to participate in a small groups, to practice leadership skills and various group tasks and roles, identify group norms and culture, understand group systems and dynamics, learn appropriate group communication, support group productivity, evaluate yourself and peer's performance, and construct and present team presentations. Students will study the contemporary theories of group development and dynamics between small group interaction, identity and systems from a social science perspective. From the context of the world of soccer, students will be expected to analyze and compare systems and identities as they relate to different cultural, religious, political structures at different historical times. Students will be expected to identify how beliefs and values influence communication choices.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture-discussion, small group exercises, assignments, and projects.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Attendance and participation informal group presentations, simulations and group exercises, exams, projects and class participation.

CMST 14900-01, 02 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication 1 LA SS
NOTE: This course fulfills the Humanities prospective with the Mind, Body, Spirit Theme requirement for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Özge Girit Heck, Job Hall 212, Ext.4-3035
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The understanding and application of basic principles of interpersonal communication to everyday situations. Topic areas include self-concept, interpersonal perception, language, nonverbal communication, relational development and conflict management. The practical benefits of this course is to better understand one's own motives and interpersonal communication patterns.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture-discussion and exercises.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Exams, projects, papers. This is not a public speaking class. Students should expect to participate actively in class.

CMST 21500-01 Argumentation and Debate HU LA
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Scott Thomson, Job Hall 211, Ext. 4-3670
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Two courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students enrolled in this class will learn how to: formulate and analyze propositions, develop and conduct strategies for research, organize and analyze arguments, evaluate support for arguments, and prepare affirmative and negative cases. Students will also learn techniques for the presentation of arguments informal contexts and techniques for cross examination.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion, participation in in-class arguments.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text: Ziegelmueller, George and Jack Kay. Argumentation: Inquiry and Advocacy. 3rd Edition. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1997.

CMST 21900-01 Communication Studies Practicum NLA
CREDITS: 1
INSTRUCTOR: Scott Thomson, Job Hall 211, Ext. 4-3670
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: One course in humanities and/or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Practical experience in competitive speech on campus, in intercollegiate events, and in the community at large; debate and legislative assemblies, discussion, informative persuasive speaking, impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation, dramatic duos and readers theater.
NOTE: The instructor will designate the minimum activities required to receive credit. May only be taken pass/fail. Maybe repeated for a total of 8 credits.

CMST 21900-02 Communication Studies Practicum NLA
CREDITS: 1
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Whelan, Muller 415, Ext. 4-3542
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Permission of Instructor
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course involves active participation in intercollegiate mock trial competitions. Working from a case developed by the American Mock Trial Association, students will prepare for and perform the role of attorneys and witnesses in mock trial competitions. Preparation forth is activity involves developing a theory of the case and preparing opening statements, closing arguments, and direct and cross-examination of witnesses.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/performance/competition
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Pass/fail only

CMST 23000-01 Analysis and Performance of Literature 3A 3B FA LA
NOTE: This course fulfills the Humanities prospective with the Inquiry, Imagination, & Innovation Theme requirement for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Bruce Henderson, Muller 422, Ext. 4-3931
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: Two courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introduction to the performance of literature. Students will perform from major genres of literature (poetry, prose fiction, and prose non-fiction), with an emphasis on solo performance; there may also be some consideration of group performance of literature.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Combination of lecture-discussion and work shop performance rounds.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Each student will present 4-6 classroom performances. In addition, students will write brief analytic papers, related to their performances. There may also be occasional quizzes over reading assignments and content discussed during in-class lecture-discussion.

CMST 32100-01 ST: Oral Advocacy in Arbitration and the Courts HU LA
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Whelan, Muller 415, Ext. 4-3542
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITE: CMST 12400, Courtrooms and Communication or by permission of instructor.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an advanced communication performance course set in arbitration and other dispute resolution forums. Students will be expected to learn techniques of legal reasoning and argumentation, in conformity with procedural and evidentiary rules, and apply these techniques to oral advocacy in legal settings. The curriculum will highly engage students in observation and critique of oral advocacy from professional legal training materials; cinematic portrayals; in-class performances, and actual or mock arbitrations, trials, hearings, and oral arguments.

CMST 34700-01 Intercultural Communication 1 G LA SS
NOTE: This course fulfills the ICC Diversity requirement for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Donathan Brown, Muller 432, Ext. 4-7335
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: CMST 14000; CMST 14900; three additional credits in speech communication.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will critically examine emergent perspectives in cross cultural communication theory and research. Our goal in this class is to explore how these perspectives are radically redefining how we understand communication across cultures along with other concepts such as culture, identity, and the making of a "good society." Theoretically rooted in the idea of a socially constructed reality, we will examine how our communication practices shape and reshape our cultural realities through an international analysis of media channels and political controversies, to name only a few.

CMST 34800-01 ICC: Family Communication 1 LA SS
NOTE: This course fulfills the ICC Diversity requirement for the ICC.
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Arliss, Job Hall 210, Ext. 4-3578
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITE: CMST-14000 or CMST-14900. Two courses in the social sciences and sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Any student who has fulfilled the prerequisites.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We will explore the family from a communication perspective. Students study the dominant theories and methodologies that illuminate communication about and within the contemporary American family. Emphasis is on the central role communication plays in determining expectations and realities in a diversity of situations (e.g., nuclear, extended, single-parent, blended, voluntarily childless, gay/lesbian couple families.)
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion, seminar format.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Examinations, papers and independent projects.

CMST 35300-01 Language and Social Interaction HU LA
NOTE: This course fulfills the IC Writing Intensive requirement for the ICC.
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Bruce Henderson, Muller 422, Ext. 4-3931
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Junior standing and three courses in Communication Studies.
STUDENTS: Open to all students interested in studying use of language in everyday interaction.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course, students will apply and evaluate
the social dimensions of human language use. Course topics will include the structure of language (sound, word, sentence, meaning, use), language development in children and adult use of metaphors, slang/slurs, regional dialects, language and identity (race, gender, sexuality, disability), conversation and socially mediated language, extinct and endangered language, and invented language. Students will study a speech community of their choice, as well as look closely at their own use of language.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture-discussion, seminar format.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Major project, short papers, exams.

CMST 38907-01 ST: Gendered Blackness: Black Feminist Culture and Criticism US HU LA
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Ashley Hall, Muller 414, Ext. 4-3534
ENROLLMENT: 18
PREREQUISITES: Three courses in the humanities and social sciences; additional prerequisites as appropriate to the topic.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will survey the historical development of Black feminist theory and criticism in conversation with feminism(s) of color, Black Queer Studies, Afro-Pessimist Studies, Afro-Futurist Studies and Black Cultural Studies through an exploration of history, politics, literature, poetry, theory, film, and music. The goal of the course is to help students foster a critical understanding of multiply situated subject positions that will be useful in encouraging more in-depth and revealing analyses of research on Black women. As the course is interdisciplinary in nature, I invite students to pull from their interest in Literature, Communications, History, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, African American Studies, Women’s Studies, Asian American Studies Latino/a Studies and others to complicate our understanding of Black women's public discourse historically into the 21st century.

CMST 39500-01 Internship: Communication Studies NLA
CREDITS: 1-12
INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Arliss, Job Hall 210, Ext. 4-3578
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Cumulative GPA of 2.30; permission of speech communication faculty. Variable credit.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Work-study project designed by the student in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and a non-site practicing professional. The proposal must define the work to be done, the theories to be explored, and the student’s plan for submitting a written report based on his or her experience. Offered on demand only. Credits earned with this course may not be used as upper-level elective credit toward a speech communication major.

CMST 42902-01 Seminar American Eloquence LA 3a h
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Sullivan, Muller 429, Ext. 4-3930
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Two courses in SPCM or permission of instructor
OBJECTIVES: This seminar will encounter systematically the masterpieces of American rhetoric, focusing in particular on great speeches. We will encounter our history's greatest, most famous, and most infamous speeches, reading, listening to, and viewing speeches from every historical era and situation, spoken by men and women of every conceivable circumstance. The study of rhetorical discourse forces us to confront several important matters, including the historical exigency towards which such discourse is aimed, the character and position of the speaker or writer, and the rhetorical culture of the era. Accordingly, we will investigate speeches not merely as examples of aesthetic excellence but as historical artifacts. Speech texts, considered in this way, are voices in historically situated arguments, and by encountering these texts we re-engage important and often unresolved conflicts central to the American experience. This course then is not merely a survey of masterpieces but an entry into the American (and historical) spirit of controversia.
STUDENTS: All are welcome.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Seminar

CMST 45900-01 Seminar in Communication Theory: The Rhetoric of Religion 1 LA SS
CREDITS: 3
INSTRUCTOR: Christopher House, Muller 429, Ext. 4-3216
ENROLLMENT: 10
STUDENTS: Open to all Ithaca College students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Understanding religion as a rhetorical perspective, a methodological lens, and as an object of study, as traditions with doctrines and practices, but more importantly as the “quest for complex subjectivity” or more simply the effort to make life meaningful in complex ways, this course explores the relationship between rhetoric and religion and the rhetoric of religion. That is to say, this course is concerned with discussions of the ways in which religious rhetoric has been used to provide meanings for life. This course interrogates a variety of rhetorical aspects of religious experiences, themes, morals and values that are presented in and through a much wider range of products and practices that take on religious connotations, while remaining ostensibly secular sites of experience. As such, students examine, for example, rhetorical spaces where religion and culture meet in popular expression with an eye not so much toward specific behaviors and narratives that invite religious interpretation, but rather toward non-traditional sites where Americans seem to be turning (or being led) for resources in the day-to-day task of building their spiritual and moral lives. By engaging in careful readings of books, essays and other texts, students will examine (1) early and contemporary understandings and uses of religion and rhetoric or religious rhetoric (2) how an understanding of religious rhetoric broadens the scope of language (3) how the use of the sacred formulate argument and ideology.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture- discussion
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text(s) to be announced. Papers, presentations, exams, attendance and participation.

CMST 49500-01 Internship: Communication Studies NLA
CREDITS: 1-12
INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Arliss, Job Hall 210, Ext. 4-3578
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: Communication Studies (CMST) major, with a cumulative GPA of 2.30 and 3.00 in the major; permission of Communication Studies (CMST) faculty. Variable credit, up to 12 credits.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Work-study project designed by the student in consultation with a sponsoring faculty member and a cooperating practicing professional. The proposal must define the work to be done, the theories to be explored, and the student’s plan for submitting a written report based on his or her experience. Offered on demand only. No more than 6 credits may be used toward the major.

CMST 49900-01 Independent Study: Communication Studies LA
1-4 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Laurie Arliss, Job Hall 210, Ext. 4-3578
ENROLLMENT: 10
PREREQUISITE: Cumulative GPA of 2.30 and 3.00 in major; junior or senior standing; permission of Communication Studies (SPCM) faculty.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Special reading and research under the supervision of the department. Must not duplicate standard coursework. Application must be made to the Communication Studies (SPCM) faculty before preregistration for the semester in which the study is to be undertaken. Offered on demand only. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.