Courses: Current and Upcoming

Current Semester's Courses

SPRING 2014

The field of anthropology is concerned with the study of humankind. It includes the evolution of the human species and the development and varied nature of the cultures and societies in which people live. For all students at the College, regardless of their major, anthropology offers a holistic and cross-cultural perspective on human culture that is essential to a liberal arts education.

ANTH 10300-01, 02 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY LA NS 2a SC TIII  
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jenny Kennedy, Gannett 131, Ext. 4-1390, kennedyj@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 32 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: This course is for students with an interest in human evolution and diversity as well as primate behavior and ecology.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to introduce the student to the study of biological anthropology.  This course will develop an understanding of humans in the context of 1) their evolution and 2) their interactive processes of human behavior/culture and biology. It is divided into three main sections.  First, the participants learn the basic principles of genetics and evolutionary theory.  Then, we explore the ecology and behavior of extant primates.  This includes addressing the diversity of both nonhuman primates and ourselves.  Finally, we focus on what we have learned from the fossil record, exploring the behavioral and biological characteristics of our ancestors.  Topics covered are mechanism of human evolution; our primate relatives and their evolutionary history; the fossil and artifactual evidence for human evolution over the past several millions of years; the bio-behavioral and bio-cultural variations found in our species today and how they reflect our evolutionary past; and explanations for these variations that may be attributed to evolutionary processes and adaptation to the environment.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Format combines lecture, discussion, powerpoint presentations and video.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: There will be one text plus supplemental readings. Grading based on exams, assignments, and participation.

ANTH 10400-all sections CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY LA SS 1, g SO TIDE TWOS  
3 credits
INSTRUCTORS:
Sections 01 & 02: David Turkon, Gannett 120, Ext. 4-1782 dturkon@ithaca.edu  
Sections 03 & 04: Sue-Je Gage, Gannett 130, Ext. 4-3574, sgage@ithaca.edu  
Sections 05 & 06: Valerie Foster Githinji, Gannett 121, Ext. 4-1383, vgithinji@ithaca.edu  
Sections 07 & 08: Denise Nuttall, Gannett 124, Ext. 4-1682, dnuttall@ithaca.edu  
Section 09: Inga Gruß, Gannett 121, Ext. 4-1393, igrub@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 32 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Open to students from all areas of the college, and of all years.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Cultural Anthropology explores the diversity of the world's societies, including hunter-gatherer societies, herding pastoralists, peasant agriculturalists, and industrial peoples in rural and urban places. It emphasizes the role of culture in shaping human adaptations and human actions, and promotes understanding of other cultures. This course examines the way anthropologists do fieldwork in varied settings and looks at the contributions anthropology can make to an understanding of modernizations, social change, urbanization, race relations, and cross-cultural communication. Professors of the different sections of this course draw on their own research in such areas as Asia, Africa, Latin America and the United States to illustrate these processes. The course provides an introduction to the field of cultural anthropology and a basis for taking upper level courses in anthropology.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Each professor teaches her/his sections independently, with different emphases, examples, and readings. For each section, the format combines discussions, lectures, fieldwork slides, and films. Grading, readings and specific requirements are set by the professor of each individual section.

ANTH 10700-01, 02 WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY LA SS 1, g h SO TIII TWOS
3 credits  
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Malpass, Gannett 127, Ext. 4-1363, malpass@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 32 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: The course is for the seriously curious – those who know something about the ancient world but who would like to know more and those who know nothing but would like to learn something.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introduction to archaeology and world prehistory. A basic introduction to archaeological methods will highlight the development of this discipline from a romantic discipline into a science. The origins of humans in Africa and our spread into all parts of the earth will be briefly discussed. Our social development from hunter-gatherers to chiefdoms to complex states will then be considered, focusing on important issues of those changes and what they tell us about ourselves. The issue of why did people all over the world settle down and become farmers and herders will be discussed.  The great civilizations of the ancient world will then be individually considered: how were they alike and different? In what ways did they endure or “disappear?" Other issues, like ethics and current controversies, will be addressed throughout the course.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: The course will be taught primarily as lectures, with questions and discussion encouraged. Films and images will supplement the class.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Book and readings. Grading based on exams, written work and other criteria.

ANTH 11500-all sections BOX OFFICE ARCHAEOLOGY: MOVIES, MUMMIES  AND THE REAL INDIANA JONES
LA SS               
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jack Rossen, Gannett 132, Ext. 4-1363, jrossen@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: Section 01: 50 plus Discussion Section 02 or 03: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Open to all interested students.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Archaeology is a uniquely visual discipline. This course is an introductory level film-based consideration of archaeology and archaeologists. Various films, ranging from the 1920s to the present, are viewed, discussed and critiqued. The foci of inquiry are on how archaeology is portrayed in visual media through time, and how media have affected archaeology, the human past and popular culture. The romanticized image of archaeology will be compared with scientific realities, specifically the nature of archaeological data, theory, field methods and analytical techniques.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion, lecture, and film screenings.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Mid-term and final exams, cultural media essays, and class participation.

ANTH 21100-01, 02 INTRODUCTION TO PRIMATES LA NS 2a
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Muller, Gannett 128, Ext. 4-3327, jlmuller@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20 per section
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10300 or permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: All students with an interest in primates.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course, participants are introduced to the behavioral and biological characteristics of our fellow living primates (including lemurs, monkeys, and apes). The beginning of the course focuses on the fundamentals of primate evolution, taxonomy, ecology, and behavior.  With these fundamentals established, we begin to survey the extant primates. Each week, a different taxon is featured and the geographic distribution, taxonomy, anatomy, behavior, and ecology of that group are examined. In addition to our study of specific primate groups, we examine the positive and negative influences of human and nonhuman primate interaction. Participants conduct a zoo observation study on the nonhuman primate of their choice. 
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, and multimedia presentations.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Based on exams, assignments, zoo study, and other criteria.

ANTH 25000-01 HUMAN VARIATION: “RACE,” BIOLOGY, AND CULTURE LA NS 2a               
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Kathryn Olszowy, Gannett 129, Ext. 4-1384, kolszowy@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: One of the following: ANTH 10300, BIOL 12100, BIOL 12200, BIOL 22700.
STUDENTS: Open to all students who meet the prerequisite.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Focuses on human variation from a biological as well as an anthropological perspective. Topics covered will include evolution, inheritance, human variability and behavior, intelligence testing, health and disease, and adaptations to various ecosystems. Students will conduct research on human variation. This course satisfies the biological anthropology requirement.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion with hands-on activities.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: In-class mid-term and final exams, reading responses, laboratory/research reports

ANTH 27500-01 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY LA SS 1, h
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jack Rossen, Gannett 132, Ext. 4-3326, jrossen@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 or ANTH 10700.
STUDENTS: This course is designed for students interested in the culture, settlement, and lifeways of native North Americans prior to extensive European contact. This course satisfies the archaeology requirement.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course surveys the rich heritage of contemporary Native American peoples in Canada and the United States by examining their lifeways from arrival on the continent to encounters with Europeans. The class will take a regional approach to cover ancient peoples as diverse as the Southwestern Pueblo dwellers, Arctic hunter-gatherers, Eastern U.S. agriculturalists, and the Northwest Pacific coast “Big Man” societies. Important debates will be discussed, including the Clovis-Pre-Clovis debate for the peopling of the New World, the meaning and nature of earthworks building, and the relative importance of climate, population size, and other factors in shaping and changing people. Finally, contemporary issues will be addressed, such as site preservation/destruction and the sensitive issue of human remains and repatriation.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: A mix of lectures, discussion, and the viewing of videos.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Books and articles. Grading based on class participation, written work, and exams.

ANTH 28300-01 INTERGRATIVE HEALTH CARE IN AMERICAN CULTURE LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brooke Hansen, Gannett 125, Ext. 4-1735, kbhansen@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: Anthropology majors and minors: ANTH 10400.  For others: Sophomore standing; one introductory course in the social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course utilizes a cultural framework to analyze the rapidly expanding and dynamic arena of alternative, complementary, and integrative health care in the United States. Through an anthropological lens, the course examines the history, scope, cross-cultural bases, and theoretical foundations of the many healing modalities that are employed in integrative approaches, including Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, Native American healing, herbalism, chiropractic, naturopathy, and homeopathy. Multiple paradigms of health and culture are examined, identifying areas of debate and convergence. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches to the study of health, culture, and society are examined, in addition to the politics of integrative health care as it relates to political economy, licensing, status, ethnicity, and gender.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion/guest practitioner speakers.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Course requirements include exams, written assignments (practitioner response papers, wellness ethnography, community response memos), participation, and attendance.

ANTH 28700-01 ETHNOMUSICOLOGY LAB LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Denise Nuttall, Gannett 124, Ext. 4-1682, dnuttall@ithaca.edu  
ENROLLMENT: 10 
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 and permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: Open to students interested in music and culture, performance, South Asian Studies, and/or World Music.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course, essentially experiential in nature, provides students with an introduction to South Asian classical and folk music making. Focusing on North Indian classical percussion (the art of tabla) and various folk instruments, students will learn basic musical skills of classical Hindustani music (rhythm and melody). While a special emphasis will be placed on the structure and function of rhythm in Indian classical music students may also have the opportunity to participate in world music workshops with guest musicians covering a variety of cultural music making contexts. This course seeks to provide students with some working knowledge of music making in non-western contexts and is open to students with no previous musical training or practical experience.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Classes will predominately be based on music training in the art of tabla, dholak and other percussion instruments and may include some master classes or workshops with world musicians, as well as various listening sessions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students will be required to attend all classes and dedicate one hour a day (minimally 4 days a week) towards practice of the various compositions learned in these classes. Students do not need to buy their own set of tabla as they will be eligible to sign out instruments for practice sessions.  Students will be encouraged to learn the theory and practice behind North Indian music by acquiring skills in compositional note taking. Some reading will be required. Assignments include learning basic strokes, compositions, and a variety of rhythmic structures (North and South Indian music systems and others depending on guest musician availability). As this is a performance based music lab students will be examined on their musical development in each class.

ANTH 30200-01 ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELD METHODS LA SS
4 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sue-Je Gage, Gannett 130, Ext. 4-3574, sgage@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 and one 200 level anthropology course. Open to Anthropology majors only.
STUDENTS: This course is a required course for anthropology majors who plan to do a field project within the subdiscipline of socio/cultural anthropology or for students who want to learn the tools for conducting ethnographic research.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Enrolled students learn anthropological field methods by analyzing the use of methodological approaches, by reading methodological manuals and by carrying out field research exercises and projects. We take both a traditional ethnographic approach as well as an applied approach. We consider how traditional ethnographers obtain and interpret data on which they base their monographs. We will also consider how applied anthropologists identify problems, gather cultural data, design research projects and choose appropriate research methods or “instruments,” select study populations, engage people in the design and implementation of the study, monitor and evaluate the progress of their research, and interpret outcomes. Importantly, we will examine professional codes of ethics and the human subject review processes that seek to ensure that ethical boundaries are not crossed. Students will also create their own individual research projects and proposals.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: This course uses a seminar format. Students carry out numerous fieldwork exercises and present these in write-ups as well as through class presentations. Depending on the size of the class students may work alone or in research teams. There are also readings, presentations, guest lectures and films. Teachers reserve the right to assign specific research projects and exercises.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Full participation in local fieldwork exercises, and an original research project and proposal, including writing up, presenting and discussing their results in class.

ANTH 36400-01 NEW WORLD COMPLEX SOCIETIES LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Malpass, Gannett 127, Ext. 4-1363, malpass@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 or ANTH 10700 and either one 200-level anthropology course or junior standing and one additional social science course.
STUDENTS: Any students who are interested in complex organizations or societies or the processes of cultural evolution are encouraged to enroll, with instructor's consent if the prerequisites are lacking. While the subject matter is prehistoric cultures, the ideas are more general. This course counts towards the theory requirement for anthropology majors.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will explore the origins and evolution of civilizations and other complex societies as they appeared in two areas of the New World: prehistoric Mexico and Peru. We will go beyond mere descriptions of the cultures discussed to an explanation of why they developed when they did and where they did. From this, it is hoped that students will acquire a greater understanding of the factors responsible for, and the processes involved in, the development of complex societies. In addition, it is hoped that students will grasp the relationships that hold a society together or tear it apart that will be useful in understanding how modern societies operate.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion with some lectures.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: At least one book and many supplemental readings. Grading based on individual written work, group projects, and also class participation.

ANTH 37500-01 ENVIRONMENTAL ANTHROPOLOGY LA SS 1, g
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: David Turkon, Gannett 120, Ext. 4-1782, dturkon@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 or ANTH 12900 and either one 200-level anthropology course or junior standing and one other social science course. 
STUDENTS: Open to students with interests in global, multicultural and environmental studies as well as anthropology. This course counts towards the theory requirement for anthropology majors.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will track the development of environmental anthropology. Topics include territorial and property issues, customary vs. formal law, relationships between people and natural resources, and distinctions between culture and nature. Theoretical perspectives from cultural ecology, environmental anthropology and political ecology will be used to explore themes such as global and transnational processes private property rights vs. “commons,” global environmental movements and the issues they address, the environmental justice movement, technology transfer and sustainable development, and survival of indigenous cultures. We will also examine how less powerful states and indigenous groups are connected to nations as sources of cheap labor, “cultures of consumption,” and as agents in shaping global environmental awareness and policy agendas. The course will have a strong applied focus, dealing with the relevance and contributions of anthropology and other disciplines to effecting positive change in the world.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussions, films, strong emphasis on student participation, guest lectures, possible field trips.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings may include books as well as articles. The final grade will be based on two exams, a term paper and presentation, several short written assignments, and the quality of class participation.

ANTH 38400-01 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY LA NS
4 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Muller, Gannett 128, Ext. 4-3327, jlmuller@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10300, BIOL 11500, BIOL 11900, BIOL 12000, BIOL 12100, or BIOL 12200; and one anthropology course at level 2.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Forensic anthropologists are called upon by law enforcement officials when human remains are difficult to identify due to: advanced states of decay or dismemberment, extensive injury, or when complicated by multiple fatalities. This course is designed to introduce participants to the scientific principles of anthropology as they apply to forensic investigations. It is divided into three major sections, based on the types of scientific anthropological methodology necessary to successfully investigate forensic cases: osteology, recovery and forensic taphonomy, and forensic analyses of the human skeleton.
Participants conduct labs to gain practical skills in the forensic analyses of skeletal remains. Such labs include: biological profiling (determining age, sex, stature, and “ancestry”), search procedure, analyses of burned skeletal remains, and analysis of blunt-force trauma. The labs culminate with a two-part mock investigation conducted in lab groups. Each group is given a separate mock forensic case.  Participants will: 1) follow proper search and recovery procedures to identify all forensic evidence, including human remains and 2) analyze the skeletal remains. 
At completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of:
1) The skills necessary to identify individual skeletal elements and a biological profile of the deceased.
2) The appropriate means of recovering human remains, as well as the taphonomic processes that may complicate identification and analyses.
3) The basics of skeletal trauma interpretation and identification.
4) The importance of the application of anthropology to forensic investigation.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and lab.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance, reading, participation, and paper and presentation on mock investigation. Attendance, participation, exams, lab assignments, and mock investigation.

ANTH 45800-01 RESEARCH IN ANTHROPOLOGY NLA
Variable credit (may be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits) 
INSTRUCTOR: Staff
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 30200, ANTH 30500, or ANTH 30600 and completion of H&S Dean’s independent study/internship form. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Provides students an opportunity to conduct individual research in any of the subfields that are not fieldwork, such as laboratory analysis, text analysis, tape transcription, or library research on a specific topic.

ANTH 45900-01 INTERNSHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY NLA
Variable credit (may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits)
INSTRUCTOR: Staff
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10300, ANTH 10400, or ANTH 10700, permission of instructor, and completion of H & S Dean’s internship form.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Provides students an opportunity to conduct individual research that is not fieldwork in any of the subfields and under the supervision of a professional. Internships are arranged individually at the student’s request with an instructor and a sponsoring agency.

ANTH 47500-01, 02 ETHNOGRAPHIC FIELDWORK AND RESEARCH LA
Variable credit (1 to 6)
INSTRUCTOR: Staff
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 30200 and consultation with and permission of instructor.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An alternative to ANTH 47000 for advanced anthropology students with a focus in cultural anthropology whose research plans would benefit from a more individualized approach. The research may be conducted within or away from the Ithaca area under supervision by an anthropology faculty member.

ANTH 47701-01 FIELDWORK AND RESEARCH: SPECIAL PROJECTS LA 
Variable credit (1 to 6)
INSTRUCTOR: Denise Nuttall, Gannett 124, Ext. 4-1682, dnuttall@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 5
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 30200 or ANTH 30500, and consultation with and permission of instructor.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An alternative to ANTH 47000 and ANTH 47200 for advanced anthropology students with a focus other than archaeology or ethnography whose research plans would benefit from a more individualized approach. The research may be conducted within or away from the Ithaca area under supervision by an anthropology faculty member.

 

 

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