Courses: Current and Upcoming

Previous Years' Courses

Spring 2013

The field of anthropology is concerned with the study of humankind. It includes the evolution of the human species and the development and varied nature of the cultures and societies in which people live. For all students at the College, regardless of their major, anthropology offers a holistic and cross-cultural perspective on human culture that is essential to a liberal arts education.

ANTH 10300-01, 02 BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY LA NS 2a  
3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Felicia Madimenos, Gannett 131, Ext. 4-1390, fmadimenos@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 32 per section

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: This course is for students with an interest in human evolution and diversity and primate behavior and ecology.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course examines the past and ongoing biological evolution of humans. It is divided into three main sections. First, the participants learn the basic principles of genetics and evolutionary theory. Then, we explore the ecology and behavior of extant primates. This includes addressing the diversity of both nonhuman primates and ourselves. Finally, we focus on what we have learned from the fossil record, exploring the behavioral and biological characteristics of our ancestors. The major areas of study within biological anthropology are covered, including: genetics, human biology, primatology, paleoanthropology, and osteology.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion. Casts of skeletal material, powerpoint presentations and video.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: There will be one text plus supplemental readings. Grading based on exams, assignments, and several other criteria.

 

ANTH 10400-all sections CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY LA SS 1, g        

3 credits

INSTRUCTORS:

Section 01 & 02: Sue-Je Gage, Gannett 130, Ext. 4-3574, sgage@ithaca.edu   
Section 03 & 04: Ernie Olson, Gannett 129, Ext. 4-1384, eolson@ithaca.edu 

Sections 05 & 06: Denise Nuttall, Gannett 124, Ext. 4-1682, dnuttall@ithaca.edu  
Section 07 & 08: David Turkon, Gannett 120, Ext. 4-1782, dturkon@ithaca.edu 

ENROLLMENT: 32 per section

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: Open to students from all areas of the college, and of all years.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Cultural Anthropology explores the diversity of the world's societies, including hunter-gatherer societies, herding pastoralists, peasant agriculturalists, and industrial peoples in rural and urban places. It emphasizes the role of culture in shaping human adaptations and human actions, and promotes understanding of other cultures. This course examines the way anthropologists do fieldwork in varied settings and looks at the contributions anthropology can make to an understanding of modernizations, social change, urbanization, race relations, and cross-cultural communication. Professors of the different sections of this course draw on their own research in such areas as Asia, Africa, Latin America and the United States to illustrate these processes. The course provides an introduction to the field of cultural anthropology and a basis for taking upper level courses in anthropology.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Each professor teaches her/his sections independently, with different emphases, examples, and readings. For each section, the format combines discussions, lectures, fieldwork slides, and films. Grading, readings and specific requirements are set by the professor of each individual section.
 

ANTH 10700-01, 02 WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY LA SS 1, g h

3 credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Malpass, Gannett 127, Ext. 4-1363, malpass@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 32 per section

PREREQUISITES: None.

STUDENTS: The course is for the seriously curious – those who know something about the ancient world but who would like to know more and those who know nothing but would like to learn something.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is an introduction to archaeology and world prehistory. A basic introduction to archaeological methods will highlight the development of this discipline from a romantic discipline into a science. The origins of humans in Africa and our spread into all parts of the earth will be briefly discussed. Our social development from hunter-gatherers to chiefdoms to complex states will then be considered, focusing on important issues of those changes and what they tell us about ourselves. The issue of why did people all over the world settle down and become farmers and herders will be discussed. The great civilizations of the ancient world will then be individually considered: how were they alike and different? In what ways did they endure or “disappear?" Other issues, like ethics and current controversies, will be addressed throughout the course.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: The course will be taught primarily as lectures, with questions and discussion encouraged. Films and images will supplement the class.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Book and readings. Grading based on exams, written work and other criteria.

 

ANTH 24000-01 ENVIRONMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY: HUMAN IMPACT IN THE PAST AND PRESENT LA SS

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Paula Turkon, Admin Annex 118, Ext. 4-3280, pturkon@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 (Cultural Anthropology) or ANTH 10700 (World Archaeology)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course both directly and indirectly addresses contemporary environmental issues by examining the interrelationship between humans and their environments from a long-term archaeological perspective. Critical to an understanding of environmental change, this course emphasizes archaeological, geological, and botanical methods and analytical techniques used for long-term environmental reconstruction. Through a series of case studies representing a wide range of time periods and geographic locations, the course will stress that human environmental impact is not just a product of modern society, but has always been a factor with which humans have had to contend.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, projects, and discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Discussion, small group projects, quizzes, research paper.


ANTH 25000-01 HUMAN VARIATION: “RACE,” BIOLOGY, AND CULTURE LA NS 2a                
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Felicia Madimenos, Gannett 131, Ext. 4-1390, fmadimenos@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10300, ANTH 10400, BIOL 12100, BIOL 12200, or BIOL 27100
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Using an evolutionary and adaptive approach, participants in this course gain an understanding of the factors that contribute to the biological differences between and within both living and past human populations, with a focus on human adaptation and evolutionary medicine.  This course examines genetic and phenotypic variation in contemporary human populations. It uses an evolutionary biocultural framework to understand how adaptation to various ecological stressors (e.g., temperature, solar radiation, altitude, and nutrition) promotes human biological diversity. In addition, the course focuses on how recent cultural changes (e.g., agriculture, industrialization, and urbanization) shape human variation and health, with an emphasis on chronic diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. This course uses a scientific approach, drawing on the methods, theories, and bodies of knowledge from various scientific disciplines, including anthropology, evolutionary biology, human physiology, nutritional science, medicine, and epidemiology.

 

ANTH 27000-01 NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS LA SS 1, h

3 credits 

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Carpentier, Gannett 129, Ext. 4-1384, mcarpentier@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 20

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course introduces the North American Indian experience (U.S./Canada). We will explore: Native ways of knowing, history from pre-contact to post-contact, interactions with anthropologists and science, and issues in education. Contemporary issues such as identity, land claims, mascots, popular culture and representation, and the lasting repercussions of the colonization process will play a significant role in our discussions. The focus of this course is not a superficial look at the customs and traits of the various tribes, but an examination of the issues and struggles of contemporary American Indians. Our discussions will be framed by a critical approach to Native American Studies.

COURSE FORMAT/ STYLE: Lecture/discussion

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Course requirements include written assignments (response papers, media analysis), participation, and attendance.

ANTH 28700-01 ETHNOMUSICOLOGY LAB LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Denise Nuttall, Gannett 124, Ext. 4-1682, dnuttall@ithaca.edu  
ENROLLMENT: 10 
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 and permission of instructor.
STUDENTS: Open to students interested in music and culture, performance, South Asian Studies, and/or World Music.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course, essentially experiential in nature, provides students with an introduction to South Asian classical and folk music making. Focusing on North Indian classical percussion (the art of tabla) and various folk instruments, students will learn basic musical skills of classical Hindustani music (rhythm and melody). While a special emphasis will be placed on the structure and function of rhythm in Indian classical music students may also have the opportunity to participate in world music workshops with guest musicians covering a variety of cultural music making contexts. This course seeks to provide students with some working knowledge of music making in non-western contexts and is open to students with no previous musical training or practical experience.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Classes will predominately be based on music training in the art of tabla, dholak and other percussion instruments and may include some master classes or workshops with world musicians, as well as various listening sessions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Students will be required to attend all classes and dedicate one hour a day (minimally 4 days a week) towards practice of the various compositions learned in these classes. Students do not need to buy their own set of tabla as they will be eligible to sign out instruments for practice sessions. Students are encouraged to practice in the Ethnomusicology Lab in Gannett G129. Students will be encouraged to learn the theory and practice behind North Indian music by acquiring skills in compositional note taking. Some reading will be required. Assignments include learning basic strokes, compositions, and a variety of rhythmic structures (North and South Indian music systems and others depending on guest musician availability). As this is a performance based music lab students will be examined on their musical development in each class.
 

ANTH 28800-01 THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF ANTHROPOLOGY LA SS                
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Michael Malpass, Gannett 127, Ext. 4-1363, malpass@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: For Anthropology Majors and Minors: ANTH 10400; For Others: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.

STUDENTS: Anthropology majors and minors.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will provide a history of the field of Anthropology, from its origins as an academic discipline in the 19th century through the recent trends of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. We will focus on major themes and schools of thought that have influenced the direction and perspective of anthropologists working in all fields of the discipline. The first goal of the course is to provide the historical background and theory that a serious student of Anthropology should have. The second goal of the course is to provide students with reading, writing, and presentation skills that will be useful to them in later courses and after college.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: The semester will be devoted to learning about the history and theory of anthropology. In addition, guest lectures by anthropology faculty will focus on how their ethnographic research is linked to particular theoretical schools or trends. The course will involve lectures, student presentations, and seminar-style discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Reading, oral presentations, collaborative projects, and a variety of writing assignments form the major activities of the course. Grading is based on written assignments, oral presentations, and a final activity. A significant part of the grade will be based on participation in class discussion.

 

ANTH 29010-01 SELECTED TOPICS: EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE LA SS                
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Felicia Madimenos, Gannett 131, Ext. 4-1390, fmadimenos@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10300 or BIOL 12100 or BIOL 11400COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to evolutionary (or Darwinian) medicine, a relatively new field that recognizes that evolutionary processes and human evolutionary history shape health among contemporary human populations. The field of evolutionary medicine emphasizes ultimate explanations, such as how natural selection and other evolutionary forces shape our susceptibility to disease; this perspective complements that of biomedicine, which generally focuses on identifying the immediate mechanisms that give rise to diseases and malfunctions. The evolutionary medicine approach has provided insights into why diseases occur at all and additionally has produced valuable insights on treatment strategies. This course will examine a variety of diseases using an evolutionary perspective, including infectious diseases, mental disorders, and cancers. The course will emphasize chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes, and will focus particular attention on the role of diet and psychosocial stress in the development and progression of these conditions.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Format: Lectures, discussion, labs and research paper.
 

ANTH 29011-01 SEMINAR: MEDIEVAL ARCHAEOLOGY LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Scott Stull
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 (Cultural Anthropology) or ANTH 10700 (World Archaeology)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will examine the archaeology of medieval Europe, roughly 500 to 1500 AD. It will focus on the material culture of northern and western Europe, but will also look at Mediterranean societies, both Christian and Muslim. The Viking World and its descendant realms will be examined as a fundamental part of the creation of later medieval Europe. Topics will include daily life, food, status, and identity in the medieval world, examining them through artifacts, built environment (including castles), and landscapes, and through patterns of trade, conflict, and other forms of interaction between societies.

 

ANTH 29012-01 SEMINAR: APPLIED ARCHAEOLOGY LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Scott Stull
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 (Cultural Anthropology) or ANTH 10700 (World Archaeology)

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores how archaeology is practiced in the United States today. It covers two aspects of archaeological practice: Cultural Resource Management (CRM) and Archaeology in Museums. There are two major projects in addition to exams. For the CRM section, the final project is a sensitivity assessment report that follows the New York State guidelines, exactly like the work conducted by professional archaeologists. The Museum section final project is a virtual museum exhibit, comparable to those found at museums around the world that display their archaeological material through the Web. 

ANTH 30200-01 ANTHROPOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS LA SS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Sue-Je Gage, Gannett 130, Ext. 4-3574, sgage@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400; two courses in the social sciences. Open to Anthropology majors only.
STUDENTS: Mostly students in the social sciences; but students in other fields who utilize “qualitative methods” would also benefit, including journalism, communications, music and the health professions. 
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Enrolled students learn anthropological field methods by analyzing the use of methodological approaches, by reading methodological manuals and by carrying out field research exercises and projects. We take both a traditional ethnographic approach as well as an applied approach. We consider how traditional ethnographers obtain and interpret data on which they base their monographs. We will also consider how applied anthropologists identify problems, gather culturally sensitive data quickly (rapid assessment), design research and choose appropriate research methods or “instruments,” select study populations, engage people in the design and implementation of the study, monitor and evaluate the progress of their research, and interpret outcomes. Importantly, we will examine professional codes of ethics and human subject review processes that seek to ensure that ethical boundaries are not crossed.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: This course uses a seminar format. Students carry out numerous fieldwork exercises and present these in write-ups as well as through class presentations. Depending on the size of the class students may work alone or in research teams. There are also readings, presentations, guest lectures and films. Teachers reserve the right to assign specific research projects and exercises.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Full participation in local fieldwork exercises, and an original research project, including writing up, presenting and discussing their results in class. 

ANTH-37000-01 APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY LA SS                
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: David Turkon, Gannett 102, Ext. 4-1782, dturkon@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 or ANTH 12900 and either one 200-level anthropology course or junior standing

and one other social science course.  
STUDENTS: Open to all students who have the prerequisites.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: A key goal for Applied Anthropology will be to problematize the nature of economic and social change across the globe, and in the wake of emerging processes of globalization and transnationalism. Within this framework, we will examine the roles anthropologists can take in conceptualizing and implementing “participatory action research” projects through collaboration with members of the populations who are experiencing problems, as well as through collaboration with other scientists, and development professionals. Course materials will include, but are not limited to, case studies from agricultural and livestock development, health care interventions, food security, community capacity building, resource management, and appropriate technology. We will draw upon the experiences of some guest lecturers, as well as the instructor's work in HIV/AIDS interventions in Lesotho, southern Africa and refugee resettlement in the U.S.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar format in which students will be expected to take a major responsibility for class discussion and presentation of their readings and individual research. Brief, regular summaries of readings will be required as a means to facilitate class participation. Assigned readings will be supplemented by slides and films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: In addition to a common core of reading, students will do numerous individual readings of case studies on their own. Grading based on presentations of readings, class participation, a take-home mid-term exam, and a substantive research project in an area of applied anthropology.

 

ANTH-37700-01 BIOLOGY OF POVERTY LA SS
3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Muller, Gannett 128, Ext. 4-3327, jlmuller@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 15

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10300; two courses in social sciences or permission of instructor
STUDENTS: Students with an interest in biological anthropology, social stratification, biology, and epidemiology.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Biological anthropology postulates that much of biological variation results from our ability to adapt to our environment. Culture, however, has a strong influence on our adaptability and may guide our decisions in ways that do not necessarily support biological health and well-being. Particular groups may exert power over others leading to poverty and inequality. Such relations inevitably lead to disparities in health between these groups. In taking a biocultural perspective, we examine how socioeconomic status and other forms of political and economic stratification, such as racism, affect environment and contribute to biological health. This course offers a cross-cultural examination of the biological effects of poverty, i.e., morbidity and mortality from infectious disease, occupation-related injury, and violence, in historic and modern human populations.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and seminar-style discussion.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Articles and research/service projects. Assignments, projects, and class participation.

 

ANTH-39009-01 SEMINAR: PALEOPATHOLOGY LA SS                
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Muller, Gannett 128, Ext. 4-3327, jlmuller@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10300, ANTH 10400, BIOL 12100, BIOL 12200, OR BIOL 27100
STUDENTS: XXX
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Human skeletal remains provide direct evidence of specific events experienced throughout an individual’s lifetime. The anthropological analysis of such remains provides a view into the history of past populations that can be compared and contrasted with archaeological findings and historical archives. Skeletal remains may provide information on patterns of behavior and lifestyle, including occupational activities, social stratification, war, and mortuary practices. The topics covered include: demography, mortuary practice, cultural modifications, congenital anomalies/malformations, metabolic disorders, infectious disease, degenerative disease, biomechanics, dental health and trauma. Students examine the evidence of these pathologies through macroscopic observation of pathological lesions in human bone.     

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar-style discussion, PowerPoint presentations, laboratory exercises.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Text, supplemental readings, research paper/project. Exams, research paper, lab assignments, participation.

 

ANTH-39012-01 SEMINAR: LEGAL ANTHROPOLOGY LA SS                
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Ana Paula Pimentel Walker, Gannett 121, Ext. 4-1383, apimentelwalker@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400; two courses in the social sciences.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This seminar provides an introduction to the field of legal anthropology. We will think critically about scholarship on the nature of the law in both cross-cultural and transnational perspectives. Course

readings briefly address classic texts in the field of legal anthropology and focus heavily in a range of

contemporary issues in the field of law and culture, such as the challenge of legal pluralism to

international courts. The goal of the course is to engage students in critical legal debates and to expose

students to the ways that law and culture scholarship is being influenced by the globalization of legal

and political institutions.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar format, with lecture, student presentations, multimedia materials, and discussions.

 

ANTH 45800-01 RESEARCH IN ANTHROPOLOGY NLA

Variable credit (may be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits)

INSTRUCTOR: Staff

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 30200, ANTH 30500, or ANTH 30600 and completion of H&S Dean’s independent study/internship form.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Provides students an opportunity to conduct individual research in any of the subfields that are not fieldwork, such as laboratory analysis, text analysis, tape transcription, or library research on a specific topic.

 

ANTH 45900-01 INTERNSHIP IN ANTHROPOLOGY NLA

Variable credit (may be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits)

INSTRUCTOR: Staff

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10300, ANTH 10400, or ANTH 10700, permission of instructor, and completion of H & S Dean’s internship form.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Provides students an opportunity to conduct individual research that is not fieldwork in any of the subfields and under the supervision of a professional. Internships are arranged individually at the student’s request with an instructor and a sponsoring agency.

 

ANTH 46000-01 ADVANCED READINGS IN ANTHROPOLOGY LA

Variable credit

INSTRUCTOR: Staff
ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 and three other anthropology courses and permission of instructor.

STUDENTS: Majors and upper level students who have made prior arrangements with the individual professor for the desired topic.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: For individual advanced work in topics not covered in regular course offerings.

 

ANTH 47004-01 FIELDWORK AND RESEARCH BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: SEMINAR LA

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Jennifer Muller, Gannett 128, Ext. 4-3327, jlmuller@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 30600
STUDENTS: This course is for advanced majors.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Gives advanced anthropology students with a specialization in biological anthropology, an opportunity to do supervised fieldwork, as required for the major. It combines small group class meetings and out-of-class research projects, enabling students to utilize and improve their skills in the methodological approaches previously learned.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar-style discussion, laboratory and field exercises.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings drawn from articles in journals and edited volumes. A textbook may also be required. Students will present the results of semester projects in class and/or regional/national meetings. Grading based on term project report, presentation and participation.

 

ANTH-48000-01 MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY LA SS                                                       

3 credits

INSTRUCTOR: Brooke Hansen, Gannett 125, Ext. 4-1735, kbhansen@ithaca.edu

ENROLLMENT: 10

PREREQUISITES: ANTH 10400 and ANTH 30200 and one other 300-level anthropology course.

STUDENTS: Anthropology majors/minors and anyone interested in health care delivery, international development, cross-cultural healing systems, and the cultural and social aspects of illness and its treatment.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course explores healing traditions, beliefs, and practices from around the globe. Healing modalities based in the scientific tradition, namely biomedicine, are examined and contrasted with other traditions based on cultural conceptions of balance and interconnection, such as Chinese medicine, African American health and healing, Haitian Vodou, Latin American ethnomedicines, and Holistic or Alternative healing in the U.S. Theoretical perspectives in medical anthropology are discussed and symbolic perspectives on health, gender, the body, and spiritual healing are examined cross-culturally. This analysis is coupled with an in-depth look at delivering health care in culturally pluralistic settings and how health care professionals in this country can develop a greater sensitivity to the issues involved in multicultural health care (for example, what happens when a Navajo patient summons a medicine man to the hospital?). Another significant area of medical anthropology covered in this class is applied anthropology, or how medical anthropologists work on multi-disciplinary teams (especially in the context of international health) to find solutions to pressing human problems such as HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, and the insalubrious effects of industrialization in developed and developing countries.

COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar format, with lecture, student presentations, multimedia materials, discussions, and guest lecturers.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Health research project, collection and analysis of illness narratives, book reviews and class participation.

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