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Monday Morning Memo

Here's a brief synopsis of what's going on this week in regards to Physics... and beyond.

Posted by Jill Ackerman at 10:13AM   |  Add a comment

Please join us as Majors in the Department of Physics & Astronomy give talks on their summer research:

Marcell Fischler ’17:
Low-temperature Physics and its Far-reaching Applications

Andrea N. Santiago-Boyd ’17:
Constraining the Surface Magnetic Field of AGB stars.

Tues., Mar. 8, 2016
CNS 204 @ 12:10 p.m.
Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup. Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 12:11PM   |  Add a comment

Please join us for a talk entitled - How to Build an Airplane - with Professor Bruce Thompson, Ithaca College Department of Physics and Astronomy

"I built an airplane. I'll talk about how I did it." - Bruce Thompson

Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 12:10 in CNS 206B

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup. Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.

 


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 12:21PM   |  Add a comment

Wolfram Technologies in Mathematical Research presents a talk on Mathematica 10

Tuesday, February 16, 2016 12:10-1:05, including Q&A CNS 204

·       Enter calculations in everyday English, or using the flexible Wolfram Language
·       Visualize data, functions, surfaces, and more in 2D or 3D
·       Store and share documents locally or in the Wolfram Cloud
·       Use the Predictive Interface to get suggestions for the next useful calculation or function options
·       Access trillions of bits of on-demand data
·       Use semantic import to enrich your data using Wolfram curated data
·       Easily turn static examples into mouse-driven, dynamic applications
·       Access 10,000 free course-ready applications
·       Utilize the Wolfram Language's wide scope of built-in functions, or create your own
·       Get deep support for specialized areas including machine learning, time series, image processing, parallelization, and control systems, with no add-ons required

Current users will benefit from seeing the many improvements and new features of Mathematica 10 and Wolfram Alpha Pro, but prior knowledge of the Wolfram Language is not required. All attendees will receive an electronic copy of the examples, which can be adapted to individual projects.

Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup. Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 10:40AM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday Feb 9:

Please join us for a talk with:

Professor Dan Briotta Ithaca College Department of Physics & Astronomy

Neutrino Oscillations, The Nobel Prize in Physics 2015

In 1998, Takaaki Kajita of the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration presented data showing that muon-neutrinos produced in the atmosphere by cosmic rays disappeared as they travelled from their point of origin to the detector. This implied that they had changed into a different type of neutrino. And in 2001/2002 the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Collaboration, led by Arthur B. McDonald, published clear evidence for the conversion of electron-type neutrinos from the Sun into muon- or tau-neutrinos. This discovery that the three types of neutrinos can change into each other, and therefore must have non-zero masses, represents compelling experimental evidence for the incompleteness of the Standard Model as a description of nature. 

Tues., Feb 9 - CNS 204 @ 12:10 p.m.
Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup. Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.


Posted by Jill Ackerman at 11:32AM   |  Add a comment

Tuesday December 1:

Physics & Astronomy Seminar:

Please join us for a talk with Alum Romaine Isaacs '10 entitled: The structure and properties of Cu covetic, a Cu-C alloy with high C content


The incorporation of carbon nanostructures into the copper lattice has the potential to improve the current density of copper to meet the ever-increasing demands of nanoelectronic devices.  We report on the structure and properties of a new material formed by the incorporation of carbon in concentrations up to 10 wt% into the crystal structure of copper that we refer to as “Cu covetic”. The carbon does not phase separate after subsequent melting and re-solidification despite the absence of a predicted solid solution at such concentrations in the binary phase diagram. Bulk samples, as well as thin films grown at room temperature and high temperature are investigated.  X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that C incorporates in the bulk of the Cu. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) shows that C forms a modulated structure in the crystal lattice, and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) indicates that C-K edge has graphitic nature with sp2 bonding. Raman scattering from bulk Cu covetic samples show weak peaks at ~1300 and 1600 cm-1 indicating weak sp2 bonding, in contrast to Ag and Al covetics. Copper covetic films exhibit greater transparency, higher conductivity, and resistance to oxidation than pure copper films of the same thickness, making them a suitable choice for transparent conductors.

Romaine Isaacs received his B.A. in Physics from Ithaca College in 2010. His interest in research started in his sophomore year where under the supervision of Professor Beth Joseph he conducted a solar feasibility study for Ithaca College, which was presented to the President’s Sustainability Committee. He also performed radar telescopic observations of metallic asteroids in Arecibo, Puerto Rico and remote observations from Hawaii’s infracted telescopes under her tutelage.  He went on to studying the superconductor PCCO in the group of Professor Matthew C. Sullivan, and over the following two years gained experience through the Ithaca College DANA summer internships program while working at Cornell University, Binghamton University and the University of Maryland.  He continued his education after being accepted into the Materials Science and Engineering PhD program at the University of Maryland in College Park, MD. While there he has conducted research on materials for organic and inorganic solar cells at the National Institute of Standards and Technology through the NIST-ARRA Fellowship. His recent focus is on a new material that he will speak about called “covetics”.

Tues., Dec. 1 CNS 112 @ 12:10 p.m. Pizza and Refreshments will be available for $1.
Please bring your own cup. Remember to Recycle, Reuse, Reduce.


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