Jewish Studies courses Spring 2014

11/13/2013

Contributed by Rebecca Lesses

Who are the Hasidim? Can women be rabbis? What is Kabbalah and who can study it? Are Jews a race? What do Israeli films reveal about Israeli society?

Do you want answers to these questions? Then take a Jewish Studies course in Spring 2014.

JWST/RLST 20300 Judaism (taught by Rebecca Lesses) - this is a course on Judaism as a religious civilization. It introduces Judaism as a worldview, a daily way of life, and a system of ethics. The goal of the course is for students to gain and understanding of the lived tradition of Judaism. Students will study Jewish texts like the Bible and the Talmud, learn about the cycle of Jewish life and of the Jewish year, and consider ethical issues through the lens of the Jewish tradition. MWF 10-10:50 am

JWST 27500 Selected Topics: Israeli Culture through Film (taught by Mirit Hadar) - this course presents films made in Israel as a way to learn about Israeli society and culture. The first part of the course will deal with historical events through contemporary Israeli films, and the second part will deal with cultural and social aspects of Israel as shown in Israeli movies. Students will become acquainted with some of the major issues that shape Israeli society, including internal religious tensions, relationships between Jews and Arabs, immigration, terror, and other issues. MW 4:00-5:15 pm.

JWST 29400 Contemporary Jewish Identities: Gender, Race, and Power (taught by Rebecca Lesses) - What does it mean to be Jewish? Is it a racial or religious identity, a matter of ethnicity or nationality? Are there specific ways of being a Jewish woman or man? This course focuses on Jewish identity through four lenses: 1) Jews and Race; 2) Post-Holocaust Jewish identity; 3) Jewish identity in Israel; 4) Gender, Feminism, and Queer Identity. TR 4:00-5:15 pm. This course is a Humanities Themes and Perspectives Course - Identities and Power and Justice

JWST/RLST 33300 Jewish Mysticism (taught by Rebecca Lesses) - This course traces the history of Jewish mysticism through its beginnings in the Bible to the flourishing of Kabbalah in 16th century northern Israel, the Hasidic movement, and the contemporary revival of Kabbalah.
MWF 1:00-1:50 pm

Questions? Contact Rebecca Lesses, coordinator of Jewish Studies, at rlesses@ithaca.edu.

0 Comments



http://www.ithaca.edu/intercom/article.php/2013111315005539