Courses: Current and Upcoming

Current Semester Courses

SPRING 2014

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 10100-01,-02 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 1 HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brendan Murday, Rothschild Place 143, Ext. 47029, bmurday@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to philosophy that focuses on perennial philosophical problems, such as: the existence of God, the possibility of knowledge, the relation of the mind to the body, criteria for survival over time, the compatibility of freedom and determinism, and the relation between freedom and moral responsibility, utilizing primarily contemporary readings.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture with emphasis on class discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three exams or papers, class participation; A-F.

PHIL 10100-03,-04 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 1 HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 4-3077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITE: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on perennial philosophical problems including: (1) Does God exist? (2) What is the extent and possibility of knowledge? (3) What is the relationship between the mind and the body? (4) What sorts of changes can I as an individual survive? (5) What ought we to do? We will read mostly contemporary philosophical works.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture with significant amounts of time devoted to discussion. The focus is on learning analytical philosophical skills.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Participation, reading/reading guides, quizzes, papers, exams.

PHIL 10100-05 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 1 HM HU LA TIDE TMBS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 4-5713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course introduces the students to the discipline by featuring a selection of classical readings and arguments pertaining to the problems of knowledge, morality, free will, individuality and authenticity.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three exams; quizzes; participation.

PHIL 20100-01 PLATO & ARISTOTLE HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in humanities, social sciences, or science.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course, we will be reading a set of primary texts (some of Plato’s dialogues and various works of Aristotle) along with contemporary secondary sources on both. We will divide our attention equally between normative questions (ethics and politics) and metaphysical and epistemological questions in both Plato and Aristotle. Our goal will be to arrive at a comprehensive understanding of each author, but also to do some close, thorough reading of their works. We will pay special attention to the fact that Greek philosophy arises in a historical context very different from our own and that reading authors such as Plato and Aristotle requires us to understand, insofar as it is possible, issues, concepts, and the world-view that are largely alien to us today, and yet from which we can learn in numerous ways.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, and group-work.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams (midterm and the final), short summary paper on Plato (5 pages), research paper on either Plato or Aristotle (10 pages long), weekly contributions to Sakai discussion board. Grading based on the course requirements.

PHIL 20300-01 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC 2B LA NS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brendan Murday, Rothschild Place 143, Ext. 47029, bmurday@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities, sciences, or mathematics.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Study translation between English sentences and logical notation, the logic of truth functions, and proofs in sentential and predicate logic, with an ultimate aim of assessing the validity of arguments.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture with homework problems.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Five exams and class participation; A-F.

PHIL 20300-02,-03 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC 2B LA NS
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place 141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities, sciences, or mathematics.
STUDENTS: Any.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To introduce the students to the fundamentals of formal reasoning.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Four exams.

PHIL 21200-01 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS 1 HM HU LA TIDE
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction to the problems and theories of normative and critical ethics. Readings are selected from both classical and contemporary sources. We will consider a wide range of contemporary moral issues, such as abortion, war, capital punishment, the treatment of animals, and aid to the needy.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 3 exams, final exam, short written assignments (class participation too); traditional grading.

PHIL 21200-02 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS 1 HM HU LA TIDE
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 45713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Students from all disciplines are welcome. Expect willingness to engage in critical in-class discussion.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Classical and modern readings on the foundations of moral theory.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Three exams; quizzes; participation.

PHIL 23000-01,-02 BIOETHICS 1 HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Tatiana Patrone, Rothschild Place 146, Ext. 47347, tpatrone@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing or above.
STUDENTS: Interested students of all disciplines are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is an introductory course in biomedical ethics. The developments in biomedical science that occurred in the course of the XX century have opened the door to some important philosophical problems: When – if at all – is it morally appropriate to terminate a pregnancy? Are doctors morally justified in helping patients to end their lives? Is it morally permissible to change the genetic make-up of our children? Is cloning morally objectionable? To what extent should the state be allowed to legislate over issues such as these? The course in bioethics is meant to acquaint you with some key arguments, perspectives, ideas, and positions that philosophers have developed concerning these questions. While the course does not promise to give simple answers to these questions, it will aim at helping you to acquire the philosophical skills necessary to develop such answers. You will learn how to read and to understand philosophical texts dealing with issues in bioethics, how to parse and to assess philosophical arguments, and how to come up with both critical and constructive arguments of your own.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, discussion, group-work, debate.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two exams (midterm and the final), research paper (10 pages long), weekly contributions to Sakai discussion board; grading based on the preceding requirements; attendance and participation will be taken into consideration.

PHIL 25000-01 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS 1 HM HU LA TQSF
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITE: Sophomore standing or above, or the permission of the instructor.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: A critical examination of various moral problems raised when considering environmental issues. Questions regarding the moral status of animals, future generations, and the environment as a whole are explored. Also taken up are the moral aspects of famine relief, population control, and resource use. These issues, and others, generate challenging and fundamental questions of moral philosophy: What is the basis of obligation? Do animals have rights? What does it mean to say something is intrinsically valuable?
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: 3 exams, final exam, several short written assignments (class participation); traditional grading.

PHIL 26500-01 PHILOSOPHICAL PROBLEMS IN LAW HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in philosophy.
STUDENTS: All who meet the prerequisite are welcome.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Examination and evaluation of basic practices and principles of law, focusing on such topics as the nature of law and extent of legal liability; competing theories of constitutional interpretation; and the justification of punishment, including capital punishment. Examination of prominent legal cases and their underlying principles. Emphasis on philosophical analysis and moral evaluation.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture, and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, exams, in-class debates; traditional grading.

PHIL 28300-01,02 INTRODUCTION TO BUDDHISM 1 G H HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brian Karafin, Rothschild Place 109, Ext. 41585, karafin@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Anyone with interest.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An historical and cultural inquiry into the major themes of Buddhism, from the teachings of the historical Buddha to applications of Buddhist teachings and practices in contemporary life. Please note: PHIL-28300 is cross-listed with RLST-28300. Students may not earn credit for both PHIL-28300 and RLST-28300.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussions, films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings may include:
Damien Keown, Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction;
Glenn Wallis, The Dhammapada;
Philip Novak, ed. The Inner Journey: Views from the Buddhist Tradition;
Fred Eppsteiner, The Path of Compassion;
Joanna Macy, Widening Circles.
Journals and two exams.

PHIL 31100-01 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 4-3077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Two courses in philosophy, with at least one at level 2.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on critically examining the supposed divine attributes, including omnipotence, omniscience, and omnibenevolence. Example topics include: (1) the possibility of being both omnipotent and essentially omnibenevolent; (2) the compatibility of divine foreknowledge and free will; (3) the problem of evil. Please note: PHIL-31100 is cross-listed with RLST-31100. Students may not earn credit for both PHIL-31100 and RLST-31100.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: This class will be very heavily lecture based. Individual classes will mostly be focused on running through arguments, objections to those arguments and responses to those objections. The focus is on working through topics in the philosophy of religion in the contemporary style of analytic philosophy.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance, reading, a research paper, quizzes, exams.

PHIL 32600-01 SEMINAR IN AESTHETICS HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Serge Grigoriev, Rothschild Place 142, Ext. 45713, sgrigoriev@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: A background in philosophy or the arts, including three courses in the humanities or the fine arts.
STUDENTS: Students with background and interest in philosophical arguments
COURSE DESCRIPTION: We will discuss some of the currently debated topics in aesthetic theory and philosophy of the arts, focusing specifically on the a) respective roles of interpretation and experience in responding to artworks b) artwork as a form of expression and the problem of authorial intention c) relationship between artistic activities and biological capacities and needs of our species.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Seminar.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Two tests; participation; short papers.

PHIL 34000-01 GLOBAL ETHICS HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Frederik Kaufman, Rothschild Place 145, Ext. 41260, kaufmanf@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: One course in philosophy; two courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course surveys significant ethical challenges that are global in scope: Are there such things as universal human rights, or is morality ultimately relative to one's particular culture? What, if any, duties do we have to the global environment? What is the difference between a just and unjust war, and between just and unjust ways of combating terrorism? Morally speaking, what can be said in defense of economic globalization, and against it? Are global inequalities in wealth morally defensible?
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Weekly written commentaries on the readings, mid-term and final papers (class participation); traditional grading.

PHIL 37509-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY: FREEDOM, EQUALITY & DEMOCRACY HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Duncan, Rothschild Place 144, Ext. 43580, cduncan@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: One course in philosophy; two additional courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is a critical examination of some key concepts in political philosophy, namely, freedom, equality, and democracy. These ideals have inspired many of history's great revolutions, both peaceful and violent. Anyone who rejects monarchy and systems of caste accepts these ideals in some form. But how exactly are these ideals best understood? We will examine competing conceptions of freedom and equality, and explore to what extent these ideals are in tension with each other and to what extent they are compatible. We examine the implication of these different understandings for debates over competing economic systems (such as capitalism, socialism, and mixed economies). We will also examine competing understandings of democracy (including challenges that question whether it is desirable at all), and conclude with an examination of some perceived threats to the health of our democratic institutions (such as the prevalence of money in campaigns and the low intellectual level of debate that prevails in the media).
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lecture/discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers and exams; A-F.

PHIL 38200-01 TWENTIETH-CENTURY PHILOSOPHY HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Robert Klee, Rothschild Place 141, Ext. 41276, klee@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: One course in philosophy and two additional courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Philosophy majors and minors.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: To investigate the main trends and concerns of 20th century philosophy. Readings will be from important works in logical positivism, the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein, and recent varieties of pragmatism and naturalism.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Lecture and discussion.

RELIGION

RLST 10400-01,02 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT
HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Rachel Wagner, Rothschild Place 111, Ext. 4-3249, rwagner@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course provides an introduction to the most critical scholarly issues relating to the development of the New Testament and its interpretation, focusing especially on: the gospel accounts of the life and teachings of Jesus; major themes in the letters by Paul; the Book of Revelation; and early Christian writings that rivaled those canonized in the New Testament. Along the way, students will be invited to critically analyze portions of films that portray elements of the New Testament and assess their accuracy. The course provides students with the historical-critical tools necessary for understanding how the New Testament was composed, what its authors believed about Jesus, and how these ideas were shaped over the first century of the Common Era.

RLST 10500-01,-02 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS: INDIGENOUS AND EASTERN 1 G H HM HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Angela Rudert, Rothschild Place 110, Ext. 45155, arudert@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
STUDENTS: Recommended for religion minors, this course is open to all students interested in the subject matter.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course will discuss perennial religious themes such as the questions of ultimate orientation and meaning as they have been addressed by indigenous cultures and eastern religious cultures (primarily Hindu and Buddhist, but also including Sikh, Jain and Taoist traditions). Contemporary interest in the visionary, shamanic, and meditative aspects of these cultures will be analyzed in terms of the academic study of religion.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, class discussion, and films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Reading and class discussion emphasized; two exams; periodic written reading-responses.

RLST 10600-01,-02 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS: WESTERN AND MODERN 1 G H HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Menning, Rothschild Place 139, Ext. 45802, nmenning@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: None.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces the academic study of religion through exploration of the origins, historical development, and thought and practice of the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Emphasizes how religious beliefs and practices evolve in response to historic events and changing cultural contexts, including interactions with other religious traditions.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures and discussion.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Letter grade based on exams, written assignments, and class participation.

RLST 20300-01 JUDAISM 1 G HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Rebecca Lesses, Williams 119H, Ext. 4-3556, rlesses@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Students interested in religion, philosophy, and the study of diverse cultures.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers an introduction to Judaism as a religious civilization, with a focus on theology, ethics, and ritual practices. Readings include selected texts from the Biblical, rabbinic, medieval, and modern periods. Theological and ethical issues include God, good and evil, covenant, death and afterlife, justice and social responsibility. The course examines how these understandings are lived out through practices associated with birth and death, marriage and commitment, sexuality, and the life of study, prayer, and devotion. This semester we will especially focus on how Jewish life is lived in a variety of Jewish communities, Sephardic, Mizrahi (Jews from Arab countries), and Ashkenazic. Please note: This course is cross-listed with JWST-20300. Students may not receive credit for both JWST-20300 and RLST-20300.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussions, visits to local synagogues, student presentations, and films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Exams, papers, class presentations and participation; A-F.

RLST 20500-01 ISLAM 1 G H HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Nancy Menning, Rothschild Place 139, Ext. 45802, nmenning@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITE: Sophomore standing or above.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduces the origins, historical development, major institutions, and central beliefs and practices of Islamic tradition, including the mystical dimension of Sufism. Particular attention is given to contemporary debates in Islamic Studies that shape our understanding of Islam and to Islamic responses to modern challenges of pluralism, democracy, feminism, and violence.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion-oriented, with short lectures.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Letter grade based on exams (40%), reading responses (20%), analytical paper on historical development (20%), and research paper on contemporary issues (20%).

RLST 22100-01 RELIGION AND DEPTH PSYCHOLOGY HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brian Karafin, Rothschild Place 109, Ext. 41585, karafin@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: Sophomore standing.
STUDENTS: Any interested.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will explore the psychology of religion through an inquiry into the tradition of depth psychology. We will enter into that tradition through a focus on the psychology of Carl Gustav Jung and more recent writers in the field of archetypal psychology. We will then look at later developments in psychological thought about religion such as: the encounter between psychology and Asian religious thought, and the psycho-spiritual dimensions of non-ordinary states of consciousness.
COURSE FORMAT /STYLE: Discussions centered on intensive reading.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings may include:
Carl Gustav Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections;
James Hillman, Blue Fire;
Tenzin Wangyal, The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep;
Rodger Kamenetz, The History of Last Night’s Dream ;
Stanislav Grof, When the Impossible Happens.
Journals and two papers.

RLST 28300-01,02 INTRODUCTION TO BUDDHISM 1 G H HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Brian Karafin, Rothschild Place 109, Ext. 41585, karafin@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Anyone with interest.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: An historical and cultural inquiry into the major themes of Buddhism, from the teachings of the historical Buddha to applications of Buddhist teachings and practices in contemporary life. Please note: PHIL-28300 is cross-listed with RLST-28300. Students may not earn credit for both PHIL-28300 and RLST-28300.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures, discussions, films.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Readings may include:
Damien Keown, Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction;
Glenn Wallis, The Dhammapada;
Philip Novak, ed. The Inner Journey: Views from the Buddhist Tradition;
Fred Eppsteiner, The Path of Compassion;
Joanna Macy, Widening Circles.
Journals and two exams.

RLST 31100-01 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Jonathan Peeters, Rothschild Place 138, Ext. 4-3077, jpeeters@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: Two courses in philosophy, with at least one at level 2.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will focus on critically examining the supposed divine attributes, including omnipotence, omniscience, and omnibenevolence. Example topics include: (1) the possibility of being both omnipotent and essentially omnibenevolent; (2) the compatibility of divine foreknowledge and free will; (3) the problem of evil. Please note: PHIL-31100 is cross-listed with RLST-31100. Students may not earn credit for both PHIL-31100 and RLST-31100.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: This class will be very heavily lecture based. Individual classes will mostly be focused on running through arguments, objections to those arguments and responses to those objections. The focus is on working through topics in the philosophy of religion in the contemporary style of analytic philosophy.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Attendance, reading, a research paper, quizzes, exams.

RLST 33300-01 JEWISH MYSTICISM HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Rebecca Lesses, Williams 119H, Ext. 4-3556, rlesses@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 20
PREREQUISITES: 3 courses in humanities and/or social sciences.
STUDENTS: Majors and minors in philosophy and religion, minors in Jewish Studies, and those interested in the study of religious experience.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course traces the history of Jewish mysticism. After a brief overview of early Jewish mysticism from the biblical and rabbinic periods, we will concentrate on the medieval flowering of Kabbalah, and its further developments in the 16th century Kabbalah of Safed, Israel and 18th century Eastern European Hasidism. The emphasis will be on understanding both the theoretical and experiential aspects of Jewish mysticism, and on examining some of its key texts. Please note: This course is cross-listed with JWST-33300. Students may not receive credit for both JWST-33300 and RLST-33300.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Lectures and discussions.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS & GRADING: Papers, exams, class participation and presentations. Grading based on exams, papers, projects, and class discussions.

RLST 37507-01 SELECTED TOPICS IN RELIGION: RELIGION, MEDIA AND APOCALYPSE HU LA
3 credits
INSTRUCTOR: Rachel Wagner, Rothschild Place 111, Ext. 43249, rwagner@ithaca.edu
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: One course in religion; two additional courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will introduce students to some key issues in emerging scholarship about religion in new media, connecting these issues to scholarship about very old religious media, especially apocalyptic literature. We'll read materials dealing with gaming, gun culture, media, global identity and politics, religion, and religious apocalyptic texts. We'll consider the ways that apocalyptic thinking is alive and well in contemporary media, especially in popular gaming culture. In a process-oriented mode of discussion and shared research, we'll create original scholarship (for class and possibly also for sharing elsewhere) dealing with issues of immediate contemporary importance, asking hard questions about violence and apocalypse in a global context.
COURSE FORMAT/STYLE: Discussion/seminar.

 

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