Courses by Semester

Spring 2010

COURSES IN HISTORY, CULTURE, POLITICS

ARABIC

ARAB 10200 BEGINNING ARABIC II HU LA 3a g
4 CREDITS
INSTRUCTORS:
01: Hayder Assad, Muller 117, 4-5140
02: Faten Houissa, Admin Annex 114, 4-3056
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ARAB 10100 or permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES: The course is a continuation of Arabic 101.  It will continue to provide a thorough grounding in the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The student who successfully completes this course will be able to: 1) understand and actively participate in simple conversations involving basic practical and social situations (introductions, greetings, school, home and family, work, simple instructions, etc.); 2) read Arabic material of limited complexity and variety (simple narrative and descriptive texts,  directions,  etc.); 3)write simple compositions describing a place, an event, or a personal experience.  An important objective of the course is familiarizing students with basic facts about the geography, history, and culture of the Arab world.


ARAB 20200-01 INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II
HU LA 3a g
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Hayder Assad, Muller 117, 4-5140
ENROLLMENT: 15
PREREQUISITES: ARAB 20100 with a grade of C- or better or permission of instructor.

OBJECTIVES: This course is a continuation of Arabic 201. 

COURSES IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDY

HISTORY

HIST 22800-01 ISLAM IN THE MODERN WORLD HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Jason Freitag, Muller 423, Ext. 4-5798
ENROLLMENT: 25
PREREQUISITES: One course in the humanities or social sciences; sophomore standing or above.

OBJECTIVES: This class will examine the histories of Islamic societies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and their responses to the challenges of modernity. The course will cover a range of historical moments, including the decline of the Ottoman Empire, European colonialism in Muslim lands, the rise of nationalism and nation-states in the Middle East and Islamic Asia, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the partition of India, the Islamic revolution in Iran, and the Gulf wars in Iraq. We will also cover a range of issues present in Islamic societies including the tension between militancy and quietism, religious extremism, women's economic empowerment and the changing roles of men and women as aspects of traditional Islamic society are transformed over time. Finally, the class will consider the relationship between terrorism and Islamic ideologies, and attempt to contextualize the political dimensions of Islam and its role in shaping Muslim identities worldwide.

STUDENTS: Open to all students.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Interactive lectures, discussion of assigned readings, student presentations.
REQUIREMENTS: Readings, response papers, class attendance and participation, critical essay (which will form the basis of an end-of-semester presentation).
GRADING: Based on performance on each of the above requirements.

SPANISH

SPAN 24500-01  ISLAM CULTURE IN SPANISH LITERATURE LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Sabatino Maglione, Muller 428, 4-3545
ENROLLMENT: 25

OBJECTIVES: This course will explore examples of the immense and powerful impress made by Islamic culture on Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present. During the first part of the semester, the course will survey the controversial “Westerness” of Spanish culture, facts and fancies of Islam invasion and colonization of Spain, and the subsequent arabization of Al-Andalus under the Umayyad calipliate of Cordoba. The course will then proceed to examine Muslim representations in fragments from literary works such as Mozarabic Kharjas, The Ring of the Dove, The Cid, The Book of Good Love, Islam mysticism in St. John of the Cross and Santa Teresias Seven Castle of the Soul, Moorish-Aljamiada literature: The Story of Abencerraje and the Beautiful Xarifa, Ozmin and Daraja; Cervante’s Story of the Captive and Ricote and His Daughter. The course will dedicate its last two weeks to the representations of Muslims in The Crimson Manuscript, a contemporary novel by Antonio Gala. Students will view some videos depicting Islam-Spanish culture. All the readings are in English.

STUDENTS: Any students interested in the subject matter.
FORMAT AND STYLE: I This course will be run in a seminar style, with different class members assuming responsibility for presenting summaries of the content of our readings. I will give brief presentation on each reading, underscoring its historical, cultural, and literary ambience.
REQUIREMENTS: Students are expected to prepare for each class. Each student will be assigned one reading on which to give a 5-10 minute presentation. Everyone will be expected to prepare all materials, to cooperate and to respond actively to the guidance of the leader during his/her presentation. I hope everyone will attempt to hone his/her skill at active participation in discussions, which includes both responding to your classmates/instructor, and not to dominate the discussions.
GRADING: Class participation and presentations, 40%; Exams , 30%; Papers, 30%.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RLST10600-01-03 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS: WESTERN AND MODERN 1 g h HU LA
3 CREDITS
INSTRUCTOR: Amanullah De Sondy, Park Hall 242, Ext. 45713, adesondy@ithaca.edu.
ENROLLMENT: 25 per section.

OBJECTIVES: What does it mean to talk about “Western” religions? Is there a common core of shared values that Western religions embrace? How do followers of these traditions articulate moral values and the reasons for them? What does it mean to be a “good” person according to religious values and practices? What role do stories and sacred texts play in the expression of religious beliefs? How is God described, and how have beliefs about God changed over time? What similarities and differences in belief and practice define the relationship between these three traditions? What new challenges do these religious traditions face in the modern world? This course offers a basic introduction to the history, beliefs, and rituals of the three “Western” religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The primary goal is to learn how these different religious traditions articulate questions of meaning in human life, and to look at some of the answers they propose.

STUDENTS: Religious Studies majors/minors, and any students interested in the topic.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture/class discussions.
GRADING: 100% Coursework - (2 Essays (30% each), Classroom participation (10%) and Weekly Reflective Journal 30%).

RLST 37600-01 SOUTH ASIAN RELIGIONS: GENDER, SEXUALITY AND THE BODY HU LA
3 Credits
INSTRUCTOR: Amanullah De Sondy, Park Hall 242, Ext. 45713, adesondy@ithaca.edu.
ENROLLMENT: 15.
PREREQUISITES: One course in religion; two additional courses in the humanities and/or social sciences.

OBJECTIVES: This course aims to explore gender, sexuality and the body in South Asian Religions (specifically Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism) and the way in which such notions do or do not shape their core beliefs. Such discussions will also include aspects of South Asian history, geography and politics. This course will include a mixture of textual and visual learning, including teaching an investigation into each faith’s sacred scripture, exploring their interpretation placing texts in the context of male and female activity – making effective use of South Asian film and the arts.

STUDENTS: Religious Studies majors/minors, and any students interested in the topic.
FORMAT AND STYLE: Lecture/class discussions.
GRADING: 100% Coursework - (2 Essays (30% each), Classroom participation (10%) and Weekly Reflective Journal 30%).

 

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