Ithaca College

Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy Courses

Key to Symbols
F = fall, S = spring, SU = summer, and Y = yearly

PTMS 60100 Pathokinesiology
Presents specific pathological conditions (primarily organized according to anatomical regions) that result in disorders of posture, movement, and locomotion. The presentations and analyses of these pathokinesiological conditions include neurological, neuromotor, and musculoskeletal aspects with respect to the causes of dysfunction. Laboratory exercises require the student to use movement analysis equipment to demonstrate pathomechanics and abnormal movement patterns. 3 credits. (F, Y)

PTMS 60300 Cardiac Testing and Management
Review of normal cardiac physiology and the response of this system to exercise and disease. Cardiac pathologies are discussed, including a review of the medical and surgical management of specific disease groups. Evaluation procedures utilized to determine the status of the cardiac system’s performance are studied and performed in the laboratory. Clinical management procedures used by all members of the rehabilitation team are reviewed with emphasis on specific physical therapy procedures. 2 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 60500 Pulmonary Testing and Management
Review of normal pulmonary physiology and the response of the pulmonary system to exercise and disease. Pulmonary pathologies are discussed, including a review of the medical and surgical management of specific disease groups. Evaluation procedures utilized to determine the status of pulmonary performance are studied and performed in the laboratory. Clinical management procedures used by all members of the rehabilitation team are reviewed with emphasis on specific physical therapy interventions utilized in treating patients with pulmonary disease. 2 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 60600 Orthotics and Prosthetics
Includes an in-depth review of the principles and practices of orthotics and prosthetics as applied by a physical therapist. This includes a survey of the basic biomechanical principles utilized in applying orthotic and prosthetic appliances, as well as principles of patient application, training, and management of complications. 2 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 60700 Research I
Principles and methods of scholarly inquiry. Topics include formulation of research problems, literature review, hypothesis testing, techniques of data collection, and analysis of results. Historical and philosophical methods are introduced, but the course focuses on descriptive and experimental methods. 2 credits. (F, Y)

PTMS 60800 Research II
Application of research theory to interpretation, analysis, and synthesis of scientific literature. Through group projects, the student is required to perform literature review and define research methodologies, including sampling, instrumentation, design, analysis of data, and issues concerning reliability and validity. Culminates in a project presentation. Prerequisite: PTMS 60700. 2 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 61000 Clinical Education III
This is the third placement for a student in a clinical environment. The student is given the opportunity to apply more advanced theories and treatment procedures to a selected patient caseload with guidance from a clinical instructor. Six weeks in length. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all prior required coursework. Graded U/S only. 3 credits. (F, Y)

PTMS 61100, PTMS 61200 Clinical Education IV, V
These are options for the final placements of the student in a clinical environment and together total not less than 12 weeks. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all prior required coursework. Students must register for these courses or PTMS 62100. Graded U/S only. 3 credits each. (SU, Y)

PTMS 61300 Clinical Science I -- Orthopedics
Covers pathogenesis, clinical presentation, medical and surgical management, and rehabilitation of orthopedic disorders. 3 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 61400 Clinical Science II -- Medicine
Survey of the most common diseases found in the practice of general medicine. Presentations emphasize medical management procedures and include a discussion of physical therapy interventions that may be applied to this varied patient population. 2 credits. (F, Y)

PTMS 61500 Clinical Science III -- Neurology I
Provides foundation for examination, evaluation, and interventions for individuals with movement-related impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities resulting from neurologic disease. A systematic clinical decision-making approach is used to integrate finds from a patient’s medical history and reports from other rehabilitation team members with results of standardized neurologic examinations, observation of movement, and analysis of functional tasks. The neurologic diagnosis of stroke and its related movement deficits are covered in detail. 3 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 61600 Clinical Science IV -- Surgery
Survey of the most common forms of general surgery encountered in the practice of physical therapy. Emphasis is on general surgical techniques including indications, expected outcomes, and complications, as well as the pre- and postoperative role of the physical therapist. An in-depth review of peripheral vascular disease, decubitus ulcer, and burn management is presented. 3 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 61700 Clinical Science V -- Neurology II
Examination, evaluation, and physical therapy interventions for individuals with progressive and non-progressive neurologic disease resulting from upper and lower motor neuron disorders. A systematic clinical decision-making approach is used to integrate findings from a patient’s medical history and reports from other rehabilitation team members with results of standardized neurologic examinations, observation of movement, and analysis of functional tasks. Prerequisite: PTMS 61500. 4 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 61800 Clinical Science VI -- Pediatrics
Etiology, pathology, and diagnosis; medical, surgical, and clinical examination and evaluation; and physical therapy management of pediatric disorders of the neuromuscular system. The physiological basis and therapeutic techniques of neurophysiological approaches to intervention are examined. 3 credits. (S, Y)

PTMS 61900 Geriatrics in Physical Therapy
Study of the special needs of the older adult. Preparation to plan physical therapy interventions for the problems of older individuals through consideration of age-related changes, psychosocial characteristics, and the continuum of services available for this population. Adaptations of evaluation and treatment methods for older persons are also discussed. 1 credit. (S, Y)

PTMS 62100 Clinical Education VI
This is one of the final options for placement of the student in a clinical environment. One 12-week session. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all prior coursework. Students must register for this course or PTMS 61100 and PTMS 61200. Graded U/S only. 6 credits. (SU, Y)

PTMS 62200 Pre-Clinical Conference III
Series of sessions to explain the policies and procedures for graduate clinical education and to choose sites for graduate clinical affiliations. Pass/fail only. 0 credits. (F, Y)

PTMS 62400 Professional Development III
A continuation of the professional development series, this course advances the students’ understanding and application of their role as a professional in their relationship with patients/clients in the practice setting and in our society. Prepares students for participation in clinical education coursework and clinical practice. Strategies for adaptability and time management in the clinical setting are presented. Analyses of clinical situations facilitate student exploration of ethical decision making, patient advocacy, cultural diversity, leadership, and application of professionalism. 1 credit. (F, Y)

PTMS 62500 Wellness and Prevention

The role of the physical therapist in wellness and prevention for individuals, groups, and communities. The physiological rationale behind designing comprehensive wellness programs is presented. Topics include the development and implementation of general fitness and prevention programs for a variety of clients including those with chronic disabilities. Prerequisite: PTMS 60300. Corequisite: PTMS 60500. 1 credit. (S, Y)

PTMS 62600 Professional Development IV
A continuation of the professional development series, this course prepares the student for capstone clinical education coursework and entry into the profession. Topics include current issues in physical therapy, preparation for entering the profession, and post-graduate development. The students summarize efforts in the final writing of an entry-level professional development plan, a compilation of a final professional portfolio, and a presentation of a student-developed ethical case focused on moral agency. Prerequisites: PTMS-62400; PTMS-61000. 1 credit. (S, Y)

PTMS 62900 Independent Clinical Study
Designed to meet a student’s individual needs that are identified during a Clinical Education course. Content of this course will address specific objectives identified by the student, the clinical instructor(s), and the director of clinical education. Prerequisite: Faculty permission only. 1-3 credits. (F, S, Y)

PTMS 63000, PTMS 63100 Thesis I, II
Independent research that is theoretically sound and relevant to furthering the knowledge base of physical therapy. The courses are geared to prepare students to perform independent research or to pursue a doctoral degree. The courses are conducted over the entire year of graduate study (PTMS 63000 in the fall, PTMS 63100 in the spring) and culminate in a written thesis that must be approved by the department and the graduate office. Open only to students with a minimum 3.30 undergraduate GPA who successfully pass a faculty review. Elective. 2 credits each.

Transitional D.P.T. Course Descriptions

PDPT 61000 Clinical Reasoning and Differential Diagnosis in Physical Therapy
An advanced course focusing on the physical therapist’s role, in collaboration with other health care providers, in medical screening of major organ systems. This course integrates the physical therapy evaluation with the current clinical decision-making algorithms associated with common diseases of major organ systems. The physical therapist is expected to gain confidence in clinical decision making relative to patients with complex multisystem diseases. Prerequisite: Matriculation into transitional D.P.T. program. 2 credits. (F)

PDPT 61100 Applications of Evidence-Based Practice in Physical Therapy
An advanced course that requires students to use their knowledge of research design and clinical theory to evaluate the evidence supporting contemporary clinical practice guidelines and specific patient case scenarios. Students will be challenged in classroom activities and via Internet-based assignments to integrate information from a variety of resources to evaluate clinical practice guidelines. Emphasis will be placed on determining which aspects of physical therapist practice are best supported, given current decision-making models, patient values and preferences, and clinical experience. Prerequisite: Matriculation into transitional D.P.T. program. 2 credits. (F)

PDPT 61200 Case Study Seminar
Applies the principles of evidence-based practice to selected patient cases across a variety of physical therapy diagnoses from current practice settings. Emphasis will be placed on the complex patient who demonstrates multisystem involvement. The case studies are an intensive investigation designed to analyze and understand medical and/or surgical factors important to the etiology, care, and outcome of the patient’s problems as they relate to the physical therapy plan of care. Included are factors related to cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine/rheumatological, musculoskeletal, neurologic, genitourinary, pulmonary, psychological, and hemato-oncological problems. Pharmacological issues related to management of multisystem involvement and the interaction of drug therapy with rehabilitation will be addressed. Prerequisite: Matriculation into transitional D.P.T. program. 2 credits. (F)

PDPT 61300 Clinical Teaching and Learning: Theory and Practice
Preparation to teach in a variety of settings and formats for academic, clinical, and professional purposes. Content is applicable to community presentations, group in-services/presentations as well as patient/family, student interns, and other individualized teaching. Includes teaching/learning theories and methods; impact of age, culture, environment, and motivation; domains of learning; instructional objectives; teaching methods for cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills; and instructional technology. Evaluation, feedback, and outcome measurements are included. Prerequisite: Matriculation into transitional D.P.T. program. 1 credit. (F)

PDPT 61400 Applications of Wellness and Prevention in Physical Therapy
Explores the role of the physical therapist in wellness and the prevention of common health concerns of individuals, groups, and communities. Develops the expertise of the physical therapist in functioning in this capacity. Discusses the physiological rationale behind designing comprehensive wellness programs. Emphasis on identifying risks, performing screenings, general concepts of program development and assessment, and integration of teaching/learning and motivation strategies. Prerequisite: Matriculation into transitional D.P.T. program. 3 credits. (F)

PDPT 61500 Managerial Applications in Physical Therapy Practice
Designed to develop leadership and management skills to become a doctor of physical therapy. Integration of financial, regulatory, management, communication, and marketing principles into physical therapy practice needs. Students will apply learned concepts through the development of communication, negotiation, and networking skills to enhance effectiveness as managers, consultants, and leaders. Prerequisite: Matriculation into transitional D.P.T. program. 2 credits. (F)