Title

Aesthetic Resistance: The Arts and Social Change
Prabhakar, Vinita

ICSM 10800 - 06
CRN: 21688
ICSM-WR: Art and Social Change
TR 2:35 PM - 3:50 PM, W 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

ICSM 10800 - 07
CRN: 21689
ICSM-WR: Art and Social Change
TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM, W 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

This course will focus on three primary questions: How does Art reflect the social, cultural and political climate of its time? In what ways are the Arts used as a platform for social change? Beyond affecting individuals, or even groups, does Art, in fact, have the power to affect real social change – change that might be reflected in policy and governance at the community, local, state, and/or national level? Since “Art” is a broad, dynamic and permeable term, this course will focus in particular on Visual Art, Literature, Music, and Film, from the mid 20th Century to the present, and will journey across cultures, countries, genres and styles. Our inquiries will explore the role of artists in cultivating social change, how Artists, Writers, Musicians and Film Makers have historically responded to the call for social change and how they have catalyzed social change, and how they invoke new social imaginations. Attention will also be given to defining and understanding the lines between art and propaganda. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement.

Argentine Tango for Social Justice: A History of Sexism and Whitewashing and 21st Century Efforts to Empower Women, LGBTQ, and BIPOC Communities of Tango
Silva, Mary Lourdes

ICSM 10800 - 08
CRN: 21690
ICSM-WR: Argentine Tango
TR 1:10 PM - 2:25 PM, F 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

ICSM 10800 - 09
CRN: 21691
ICSM-WR: Argentine Tango
TR 9:25 AM - 10:40 AM, F 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

In this course, you will learn about the culture, history, music, and dance of Argentine tango. Tango has its roots in African rhythms and customs. The mass immigration of Europeans to Argentina during the second half of the 19th century led to a cultural melting pot where music, dance customs, languages, and social norms gave birth to this popular dance still celebrated worldwide. The evolution and transformation of tango ran parallel to historical political socio-economic shifts that shaped the identity and purpose of tango. Part of our readings will explore the Queer Tango Movement of the 2000s and the Feminist Tango Movement of the 2010s. Moreover, we will learn about the racist roots of tango and scholarly efforts to underscore the contributions of Black musicians and dancers during its nascent beginnings. And last, we will explore anti-racist approaches to build a diverse inclusive community. As a writing course, you will examine the connections between racist sexist ideologies and practices in tango with racist sexist ideologies and practices in dance, music, theater, film, sports, chess, video games, for instance. You will be encouraged to write about any form of creative expression that empowers you and builds connections with others to form a diverse inclusive community. Lastly, as a writing course, you will examine common misconceptions about writing and develop a reflective critical writing practice. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement.

Food for Thought
Marcus, Joan

ICSM 10800 - 02
CRN: 21684
ICSM-WR: Food for Thought
MWF 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM, M 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

ICSM 10800 - 03
CRN: 21685
ICSM-WR: Food for Thought
MWF 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM, M 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

This is a course for students who love the experience of food – thinking about it, preparing and eating it, watching cooking videos, looking at food posts on social media, and considering all of the ways that food impacts our lives and our world. We’ll engage in an investigation of food culture and controversies, touching on health and wellness, media trends, environmental issues, and more. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement.

Freaks: Questioning What is Normal
Howd, Eric

ICSM 10800 - 01
CRN: 21683
ICSM-WR: What is Normal?
MWF 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM, F 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

This academic writing-based Ithaca Seminar is theme-based, which means that the readings are selected and organized around a central area of interest — in this case, that of “What is Normal?” Who decides what is “normal” and why? How are the boundaries of normality enforced? What do our reactions to those who fall outside the socially agreed upon “rules” of normality tell us about ourselves? These are some of the questions this course is designed to explore, through reading and discussing both verbally and in-writing texts such as essays, short stories, poems, and films, and our responses to those texts. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement.

Language in Cultural Context
Graham, Megan

ICSM 10800 - 13
CRN: 21853
ICSM-WR: Language in Context
MWF 2:00 PM - 2:50 PM, W 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

Students will discuss and compare perspectives on the interplay between language and culture while developing their understanding of American college culture. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement. It is designed for international students and registration for this course is allowed only through special permission.

Life and Technology in the Year 2050
Stafford, Jim

ICSM 10800 - 10
CRN: 21692
ICSM-WR: Technology in 2050
MWF 9:00 AM - 9:50 AM, M 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

ICSM 10800 - 11
CRN: 21693
ICSM-WR: Technology in 2050
MWF 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM, M 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

Students will study current technology in order to predict future advances and applications of that technology. Students will question the effects of emerging technology on medicine, ethics, space exploration, communication and communities. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement.

Popular Culture as a Text
Marks, Katie

ICSM 10800 - 04
CRN: 21686
ICSM-WR: Pop Culture as a Text
TR 1:10 PM - 2:25 PM, M 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

ICSM 10800 - 05
CRN: 21687
ICSM-WR: Pop Culture as a Text
TR 2:35 PM - 3:50 PM, M 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

In this seminar, we will explore popular culture and its role in contemporary society. We will consider whether it reflects our thoughts and beliefs or whether it shapes them. We will also investigate how it might affect who we become as individuals. Students’ firsthand observations of, and critical thinking about, advertising, television, film, music, and social networking will play a central role in the class. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement.

Writing and/with Anxiety
Delaney, Susan

ICSM 10800 - 12
CRN: 21852
ICSM-WR: Writing Anxieties
TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM, W 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

According to a national survey published in February 2019 by the Pew Research Center, anxiety and depression rank as one of the top concerns for US teenagers. Numerous reports—including this one—assert that anxiety is on the rise among college students. But what do we mean by “anxiety”? What feelings and experiences are encompassed by this term? What is the relationship between writing and anxiety? This course will begin by examining how anxiety is depicted by students, professors, and administrators, and the assumptions at work in those depictions. We’ll explore the obstacles we face as writers along with strategies for working through them. Finally, students will analyze and enter a conversation related to learning and mental health, composing a researched academic argument. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement.

Writing and Performing Culture: Musical Arts Traditions in Global History
Sirohi, Priya

ICSM 10800 - 14
CRN: 21854
ICSM-WR: Writing & Performing
TR 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM, F 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

Writing and Performing Culture takes an in-depth look at how performed music and drama genres around the world, in any medium, offer windows into global histories and cultures. This course is designed to be a cross section of writing studies, critical theory & cultural, art, and history. We will use musical arts – dramas, operas, musicals, movies, and other performances – as cultural artifacts through which we might re-envision and refine our line-level and project-level writing, but also as a topic worthy of complex and sustained analysis. This course fulfills the ICC ‘Academic Writing’ competency requirement.